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Old 01-10-2016, 01:12 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
So this isn't a 55+ community - right? Robyn


Correct, it is not an over 55 community.
The older sections have families with children. During the housing crisis these houses were not selling. The builder decided to package them as a lot and house sale and go after the retirees. They named it the cottage community. Now they are selling like crazy. The new sections are only retired and older folks.

http://www.biltmorelake.com/

Last edited by organic_donna; 01-10-2016 at 01:14 PM.. Reason: Wrong link
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Old 01-10-2016, 01:15 PM
 
Location: Fort Lauderdale, Florida
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If I could afford Southern California, I'd live there in a heartbeat.


The weather is amazing, gorgeous beaches, fantastic food in San Diego.
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Old 01-10-2016, 01:27 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
There's some interesting stuff going on in San Diego today:

San Diego's Urban Renewal

My aunt and late uncle lived in a suburb of San Diego - Rancho San Bernardo. I really didn't care for it. Note that although the weather in San Diego is on the whole more favorable than the weather in Phoenix - that is true mostly for the coastal areas - not an inland place like Rancho San Bernardo (which was very hot when we last visited a few years ago in September - not Phoenix hot but 95 or so). Also - they had a fair number of evacuation necessary fires in Rancho San Bernardo over the years. Not fun for anyone - especially older people.

When you talk about welcoming newcomers - I am not sure what you're looking for. If it's making friends with people who are of like minds and temperaments - the kind of people you would make friends with if you're younger - that's one thing. If you're talking about fitting in with a bunch of strangers with whom you have nothing in common - just to get along - that's another. I have always been mystified at the concept of changing one's self just for the purpose of fitting in. But people do it. My in-laws - who are Christian - have changed their church affiliations at the drop of a hat when they moved because X flavor of Christianity was more welcome in particular places (e.g., Baptist in the south).

Overall - I don't think the issue is as much newcomers versus existing residents as whether the people in any community/area you're looking at - 55+ or other - share your views and your values. There are parts of the world that are very conservative and religious - others that are very liberal and non-religious. And there is - increasingly - very little left in the middle. And you don't have to be a genius to figure out what an area is like. Just look at local voting results.

BTW - I am curious what you would do in a 55+ community that you couldn't do in a regular community? Although we don't live in a 55+ community - we have access to all the things we want to do in our local area. Like - for example - golf. There is plenty of golf in the greater Phoenix area too outside of 55+ communities. San Diego as well. Robyn
I have to disagree with you. I am very liberal and not religious. My new neighbor's are a mix. Most of them are from New York and Florida. Some are Jewish and some are Christians. Most have very different political and religious beliefs than I have. There are also one or two atheists that are brave enough to admit it.
Would I rather live around more liberal folks, yes but I am happy here. I try and accept other people's beliefs whether I agree with them or not.
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Old 01-10-2016, 02:54 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,923,045 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by organic_donna View Post
I have to disagree with you. I am very liberal and not religious. My new neighbor's are a mix. Most of them are from New York and Florida. Some are Jewish and some are Christians. Most have very different political and religious beliefs than I have. There are also one or two atheists that are brave enough to admit it.
Would I rather live around more liberal folks, yes but I am happy here. I try and accept other people's beliefs whether I agree with them or not.
Living around people isn't the same as socializing with people - especially close socializing (as opposed to the kind of socializing you do in a golf group - a tennis league - etc.). BTW - most people from the larger metro areas of New York and Florida - especially if they're Jewish - tend to be pretty liberal. Although perhaps not as liberal as you are. It's pretty easy to "accept" other people when they're only a little different than you are. Are you ready to "close socialize" with people who think abortion and gay marriage are mortal sins - or even to "accept" them?

Perhaps we've not on the same wavelength when we're talking about "conservative"? I suspect that's the case because Asheville and the surrounding area - where you live - tends to be pretty liberal when it comes to newcomers and many newer part-time residents (many of the latter are from south Florida). The full time old-timers (mostly rural lower middle class/poor) - and the old-timer summer country club crowd (upper income WASP) - are in another world that most newcomers don't have anything to do with. I live in one of the most conservative parts of the country (Democrats often don't bother to run for office here in things like congressional elections). To give you an idea of the flavor - look at our Congressman - Ron Desantis (he pretty much represents the beliefs of most people in the district):

Congressman Ron DeSantis | Representing the 6th District of Florida

I am ok with the politics here. They suit me and my husband. Your mileage might well vary.

OTOH - I guess it is always possible for (especially older) people from elsewhere to move to the south and live in their own little enclaves of (newer) houses with cohorts from wherever they came from. Apart from the general community. My late inlaws from New Jersey retired to a place like that in North Carolina - near Pinehurst. But they didn't have anything to do with the locals. Whether they were old establishment white people with money - or the large number of black people without money. All their friends were from New Jersey - like they were. I guess there are large pockets of old people like that all over North Carolina these days - other states too. We probably have one of the largest/the largest here in Florida - the Villages. It honestly creeps me out. The idea of living in a place that has no sense of place. And no real economy to speak of (other than the limited parts of an economy that old people support - like doctors - some grocery shopping - etc.). My next move - if there is a next move (hope so) - is more likely to be to a more integrated community - not an enclave of retirees from New Jersey. Robyn
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Old 01-10-2016, 03:04 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,923,045 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blueherons View Post
If I could afford Southern California, I'd live there in a heartbeat.

The weather is amazing, gorgeous beaches, fantastic food in San Diego.
I was talking to my husband about that today. I was ready to leave here about a decade ago - and go elsewhere. Then "life happened" dealing with elderly parents. And we haven't been able to leave since. My husband absolutely refuses to go back to Miami (can't say I blame him). What's doing with the rest of SE Florida now - anything worth looking at?

I do plan to take a serious look at southern California. Not Los Angeles. We go there often enough to know it's not a good fit for us in a lot of ways. Will look into other areas - like San Diego and similar. Perhaps the Pacific NW too. We've been in the Pacific NW enough to know the winters aren't swell - but the summers can be very nice. As I get older - I would like to get into more of a bigger city area. That is at least somewhat walkable. With ok public transportation (or good Uber). With excellent restaurants. And where the worst season (be it summer or winter) is at least tolerable. Robyn
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Old 01-10-2016, 03:49 PM
 
1,075 posts, read 1,117,388 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
Living around people isn't the same as socializing with people - especially close socializing (as opposed to the kind of socializing you do in a golf group - a tennis league - etc.). BTW - most people from the larger metro areas of New York and Florida - especially if they're Jewish - tend to be pretty liberal. Although perhaps not as liberal as you are. It's pretty easy to "accept" other people when they're only a little different than you are. Are you ready to "close socialize" with people who think abortion and gay marriage are mortal sins - or even to "accept" them?

Perhaps we've not on the same wavelength when we're talking about "conservative"? I suspect that's the case because Asheville and the surrounding area - where you live - tends to be pretty liberal when it comes to newcomers and many newer part-time residents (many of the latter are from south Florida). The full time old-timers (mostly rural lower middle class/poor) - and the old-timer summer country club crowd (upper income WASP) - are in another world that most newcomers don't have anything to do with. I live in one of the most conservative parts of the country (Democrats often don't bother to run for office here in things like congressional elections). To give you an idea of the flavor - look at our Congressman - Ron Desantis (he pretty much represents the beliefs of most people in the district):

Congressman Ron DeSantis | Representing the 6th District of Florida

I am ok with the politics here. They suit me and my husband. Your mileage might well vary.

OTOH - I guess it is always possible for (especially older) people from elsewhere to move to the south and live in their own little enclaves of (newer) houses with cohorts from wherever they came from. Apart from the general community. My late inlaws from New Jersey retired to a place like that in North Carolina - near Pinehurst. But they didn't have anything to do with the locals. Whether they were old establishment white people with money - or the large number of black people without money. All their friends were from New Jersey - like they were. I guess there are large pockets of old people like that all over North Carolina these days - other states too. We probably have one of the largest/the largest here in Florida - the Villages. It honestly creeps me out. The idea of living in a place that has no sense of place. And no real economy to speak of (other than the limited parts of an economy that old people support - like doctors - some grocery shopping - etc.). My next move - if there is a next move (hope so) - is more likely to be to a more integrated community - not an enclave of retirees from New Jersey. Robyn
It has definitely been an adjustment moving to a small town in the south. Yes, I have had disagreements with my new neighbor's regarding both politics and religion. It is not utopia by any means, but what is? I lived in the city of Chicago for 35 years. I loved it. I flew all over the world. If it wasn't for the Internet, I would feel very out of touch here.

But in Chicago, as I got older, I was very lonely. The city is not very friendly and my building was all young people. I could go months without seeing a neighbor on my floor. It was fine when I was working, but I would have been very unhappy living there retired. I would have loved to have retired to San Francisco, but I couldn't afford to live there.

I love where I live now. Regardless of my neighbor's political beliefs, they are the kindest people I have ever met. Everyone watches out for each other. I have things to do all the time and am not lonely anymore. I have a big front porch and see people walking their dogs everyday. I am not going to let our political or religious differences get in the way of my happiness.

Last edited by organic_donna; 01-10-2016 at 03:51 PM.. Reason: Grammar
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Old 01-10-2016, 07:11 PM
 
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Oh, and one more thing. I bought my lot and future house in Biltmore Lake off the internet. I had never been there or seen the community except online. I had been watching it from a distance for several years. The lots were selling fast so I had the agent fax me the contract and sent it back FedEx. Four days later I flew to Asheville. As I drove into Biltmore Lake I crossed my fingers that I had not made a huge mistake. It was a huge risk and I would not do it again, but it turned out to be a good gamble that paid off.
Now that takes guts!
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Old 01-10-2016, 07:44 PM
 
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I think you may wish to adjust the order of events. First, decide on which state. The only real way to do that is to go and stay for a while in short term rentals. You absolutely cannot trust the internet, friends, or worse, realtors for this. Once you know which state you'll be retiring to, keep your options open...you may change your mind! It happens. A Lot. Even after you decide on your state, you need to fine the right city. Once you've nailed that down, now it's time to look for the right retirement community. I've been doing this for a long time. This all requires spending some money, but it's an investment, and you can have fun doing it too.

It's best to make sure that wherever you decide on staying, you can sell it easily if you have a reason to do so. This is why we prefer 55+ mobile home communities. The buy in is low, and the liquidity is high. Very easy to sell, and you don't have much invested to begin with. These communities vary from the very affordable, to luxurious w/ lots of amenities (and with lot rentals to match). We pay less than $300 a month here in St Pete, Fl and that includes lawn care, water, and sewage and trash. The beaches are 20 minutes away or less. In California, the same thing would run $1000 a month or more easily. Some of the homes are double or even triple wide, and trust me, if they're nice you would never know they were mobiles.

"But they didn't have anything to do with the locals". Yeah, right. As a Southerner, I am sure it was the other way around. And here in Florida, if all the rude people from New Jersey moved back, it would sure be a lot nicer here. They are generally a real piece of work, let me tell you.
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Old 01-10-2016, 08:19 PM
 
Location: Arizona
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If you buy in a newer community you will not be sure you are going to get what was promised. It also doesn't mean that everybody is younger than in older communities.

I live in an old established community. We have people that are 3rd generation here, their grandparents and parents lived here before. That doesn't mean that everything is that old. Things are upgraded and replaced. There are now new homes being built.

Recreation Centers of Sun City, Inc WELCOME TO RECREATION CENTERS OF SUN CITY AZ RECREATION CENTERS OF SUN CITY AZ
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Old 01-10-2016, 08:52 PM
 
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I want trees taller than 5 ft. , we have looked at all age groups, and my age is 66. Of the established ten year old communities, I noticed almost everyone was older than me, the places are more quiet. I'm thinking we would feel less trapped in a younger community with people in our age group.

Golf and activities nearby are a big factor. We also want some space around us something to look at other than windows and patios.

It's a difficult age, like we don't fit in either stage,the young or old!
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