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Old 01-11-2016, 07:53 PM
 
44 posts, read 36,649 times
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Thanks, great comments everyone. We are on the west coast so most the 55+ homes come in like 4 choices, then you add options. Most of them look alike. I've been looking for over a year, and the prices have gone up so much that we have been priced out of most of the newer areas. Nevada is the only ones just east of Tahoe that allow custom homes and larger lots with views. The few Central and Northern California new retirement communities are packed in tight. Unless you can afford the extra $50,000 for a golf course lot, there aren't many with views.

It's tempting to go beyond the Sierras to save money and have mountain amenities, but we are moving up to northern Calif. to be closer to our grandchild, which in that case we'd be 4 hours from her. Some big choices to make coming up. Plus giving up a nice home in southern cal, it becomes emotionally charged. We do have an RV though so, we don't feel we have to decide immediately.
I appreciate all your comments!
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Old 01-12-2016, 07:21 AM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,917,951 times
Reputation: 6716
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeaceOwl View Post
Thanks, great comments everyone. We are on the west coast so most the 55+ homes come in like 4 choices, then you add options. Most of them look alike. I've been looking for over a year, and the prices have gone up so much that we have been priced out of most of the newer areas. Nevada is the only ones just east of Tahoe that allow custom homes and larger lots with views. The few Central and Northern California new retirement communities are packed in tight. Unless you can afford the extra $50,000 for a golf course lot, there aren't many with views.

It's tempting to go beyond the Sierras to save money and have mountain amenities, but we are moving up to northern Calif. to be closer to our grandchild, which in that case we'd be 4 hours from her. Some big choices to make coming up. Plus giving up a nice home in southern cal, it becomes emotionally charged. We do have an RV though so, we don't feel we have to decide immediately.
I appreciate all your comments!
Be careful with golf course lots. We originally thought of buying one - but changed our minds. And we're glad we did. When your lot is on a golf course - you have a steady procession of strangers near and sometimes in your back yard (if they hit errant shots). No privacy. Also - if you have any landscaping rules in your HOA - they are most strictly enforced in back yards visible from the golf course. No deviations allowed (including the couple of tomato plants you might want to plant). No one can see our back yard (except from the air) - and that is fine by me . Finally - depending on the location - you may wind up with broken windows from bad golf shots. Not at all uncommon and a big PITA.

Perhaps you haven't said things clearly - but I can't see moving to be 4 hours away from anything - including children/grandchildren. Four hours is still a pretty hefty drive. Why not stay put and fly in terms of visiting? Doubt you will visit more often living a 4 hour drive away than flying. Robyn
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Old 01-12-2016, 07:56 AM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,917,951 times
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Originally Posted by johngolf View Post
What Robyn says about how/having a "custom" home build is true. That said, in most retirement villages/developments while you will have a choice of models, options, etc. you will typically not be having a "custom" home built. The recent trend (I know Del Webb, Pulte is doing such) has been to throw more into the base cost and limit the option selections. In some places one use to spent a full day or more in their "Design Center" choosing options which often raised the base price by as much as 30% or more.
Agreed. And - as I pointed out in another thread - one problem with these 55+ places is they're basically regular houses in age-restricted communities. Not necessarily appropriate for aging in place when one gets into one's 70's and 80's. We built our house when we were in our 40's. And - although we built it to be suitable for our 50's and 60's - I guess there's a possibility we'll have to modify it as we get older. Most modifications would be relatively minor. Because our hallways - door openings - etc. are wide/handicap accessible. And we have a large walk-in shower - room for toilet bars - etc. And all our door hardware is of the "lever" type. But some modifications might not be minor.

I am kind of disappointed that major builders haven't come up with houses that incorporate lots of aspects of universal design:

The 7 Principles | Centre for Excellence in Universal Design

They do pay some lip service to the concept. But often offer only a few concrete implementations in the houses they build. And some are (expensive) options. Robyn
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Old 01-12-2016, 08:08 AM
 
Location: AZ
484 posts, read 478,276 times
Reputation: 1554
Quote:
Originally Posted by johngolf View Post
What Robyn says about how/having a "custom" home build is true. That said, in most retirement villages/developments while you will have a choice of models, options, etc. you will typically not be having a "custom" home built. The recent trend (I know Del Webb, Pulte is doing such) has been to throw more into the base cost and limit the option selections. In some places one use to spent a full day or more in their "Design Center" choosing options which often raised the base price by as much as 30% or more.
One option is to buy a spec home...one that has already been built and typically comes with a number of options thrown in at a reduced cost, especially if the home hasn't sold quickly. That's what we did and we got over $30,000 worth of options thrown in. Granted, we didn't get to pick our appliances, cabinets, flooring, etc., but we feel the trade-off of the other upgrades was worth it, especially at the price we paid.
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Old 01-12-2016, 08:35 AM
 
13,872 posts, read 7,381,208 times
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Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
Agreed. And - as I pointed out in another thread - one problem with these 55+ places is they're basically regular houses in age-restricted communities. Not necessarily appropriate for aging in place when one gets into one's 70's and 80's. We built our house when we were in our 40's. And - although we built it to be suitable for our 50's and 60's - I guess there's a possibility we'll have to modify it as we get older. Most modifications would be relatively minor. Because our hallways - door openings - etc. are wide/handicap accessible. And we have a large walk-in shower - room for toilet bars - etc. And all our door hardware is of the "lever" type. But some modifications might not be minor.

I am kind of disappointed that major builders haven't come up with houses that incorporate lots of aspects of universal design:

The 7 Principles | Centre for Excellence in Universal Design

They do pay some lip service to the concept. But often offer only a few concrete implementations in the houses they build. And some are (expensive) options. Robyn
I live in a place with older housing stock. Most of it is colonials and capes where only the expensive ones have ground floor master bedroom suites. 6 years ago when I was 51, I bought a small single level house in the location I wanted and completely remodeled it. Everything I did had "age in place" in mind. 36"x60" walk-in shower with blocking in the walls to accommodate grab rails some day. All the doorways were widened. Pocket doors. Lever door handles on the new, wider exterior doors. Lots of laminated beams to remove load-bearing walls and create an open floor plan. It would be quick and inexpensive to make the place completely wheelchair accessible. I also picked something that I could still afford if I completely ran out of money and was using my Social Security check to pay all my bills.

You can retrofit pretty much any house. You just can't care about how much it will cost. I dumped over $200 per square foot into my remodeling projects. It would have been cheaper to knock the house down and start over. In my case, I wanted the location and I wanted to do it all out of cash flow so I could suspend the projects at any time if I had an employment glitch.
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Old 01-12-2016, 10:01 AM
 
29,764 posts, read 34,848,700 times
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Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
Be careful with golf course lots. We originally thought of buying one - but changed our minds. And we're glad we did. When your lot is on a golf course - you have a steady procession of strangers near and sometimes in your back yard (if they hit errant shots). No privacy. Also - if you have any landscaping rules in your HOA - they are most strictly enforced in back yards visible from the golf course. No deviations allowed (including the couple of tomato plants you might want to plant). No one can see our back yard (except from the air) - and that is fine by me . Finally - depending on the location - you may wind up with broken windows from bad golf shots. Not at all uncommon and a big PITA.

Perhaps you haven't said things clearly - but I can't see moving to be 4 hours away from anything - including children/grandchildren. Four hours is still a pretty hefty drive. Why not stay put and fly in terms of visiting? Doubt you will visit more often living a 4 hour drive away than flying. Robyn
Yup, yup and yup. Talked to someone the other day who had a friend and neighbor move from their current community to one closer in because of shopping and medical services. A lot of our thinking is becoming finalized and we will probably stay put and keep our eyes on the right CCRC model for down the road. We have a place and model we like and hope they will eventually build in Raleigh which might be perfect. However their current new one is ideal in so many ways. Looking at the post 72 years hopefully and no need for sooner. It is a pay as you go model with options to rent or buy with us being interested in buying.
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Old 01-12-2016, 04:58 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,917,951 times
Reputation: 6716
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Originally Posted by TuborgP View Post
Yup, yup and yup. Talked to someone the other day who had a friend and neighbor move from their current community to one closer in because of shopping and medical services. A lot of our thinking is becoming finalized and we will probably stay put and keep our eyes on the right CCRC model for down the road. We have a place and model we like and hope they will eventually build in Raleigh which might be perfect. However their current new one is ideal in so many ways. Looking at the post 72 years hopefully and no need for sooner. It is a pay as you go model with options to rent or buy with us being interested in buying.
I still think you're too young for the CCRC stuff. Most of the independent living CCRC people in my neck of the woods are 80 or older.

If you like where you live now - why don't you just stay put? Until you definitely need something different. And - when you need something different - you can take it from there. Robyn
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Old 01-15-2016, 09:18 AM
 
Location: Columbia SC
8,948 posts, read 7,721,438 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
I still think you're too young for the CCRC stuff. Most of the independent living CCRC people in my neck of the woods are 80 or older.

If you like where you live now - why don't you just stay put? Until you definitely need something different. And - when you need something different - you can take it from there. Robyn
I am 73 and recently became a widower. While my home, location, HOA services, etc. are ideal (a care free lifestyle), one is foolish not to look down the road to be prepared for the next phase of life. My advice for anyone in retirement is that CCRC's are well worth looking at to learn about them and consider if they can be of service to you now or in the future.
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Old 01-17-2016, 03:11 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,917,951 times
Reputation: 6716
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Originally Posted by johngolf View Post
I am 73 and recently became a widower. While my home, location, HOA services, etc. are ideal (a care free lifestyle), one is foolish not to look down the road to be prepared for the next phase of life. My advice for anyone in retirement is that CCRC's are well worth looking at to learn about them and consider if they can be of service to you now or in the future.
The problem is one can't predict the "next phase" with any degree of certainty. In terms of "what" or "when". My husband and I have had what I dare to say is "good luck" in terms of watching relatives in our parents' and grandparents' generations on both sides of both our families (with different genetics on maternal and paternal sides) getting old and getting sick and eventually dying. And the only conclusion we've drawn is "you never know".

I will say that since you don't have a spouse now - you might need to plan/think a little more - since you don't have a spouse to take care of you (if there is one constant we have seen - it's that spouses who aren't terribly old or frail try to take care of the other spouse best as possible in a home environment as long as possible). OTOH - you might not need something like skilled nursing care until you're 90+ or maybe never. And who knows what the financials of any CCRC you are looking at today might look like then?

I was taken aback this weekend to find that a newer CCRC in my area which was affiliated with an established well-regarded one here had recently gone through bankruptcy. One of the reasons cited for the original bankruptcy filing was that many more residents needed more intensive/expensive ALF and SNF care than originally anticipated. Because people were living longer and sicker than anyone could have anticipated even 10 years ago. If everyone in a CCRC is now in his/her 70's - and 80% live long enough to need ALF and/or SNF care - what happens then? No way any community like that will attract new residents in independent living to subsidize lots of older residents who need more care.

Overall - our game plan - and my husband is close to your age - is we're keeping our powder dry - and money in reserve - to deal with whatever "you never know" eventualities that come to pass. Robyn
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Old 01-17-2016, 04:50 PM
 
Location: Columbia SC
8,948 posts, read 7,721,438 times
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Robyn

I think one can bet on they are not going to get younger, taller, stronger, harder/softer, less saggy, less illness prone, have increased memory functions, etc. One should plan on "deterioration" as one ages and begin to implement/plan accordingly. Independent living in a CCRC (depending on its business model) might well be no less independent living than in a non CCRC yet the maybe next steps are there in a CCRC.

I think you rule them out to fast.
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