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Old 01-13-2016, 06:55 AM
 
13,944 posts, read 7,429,050 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phonelady61 View Post
I do think tubs are an American thing . I think most Europeans prefer a shower indeed because frankly that is probably what most Europeans grew up with . I think americans grow up with tubs and therefore see a master bath as having a tub ...JMHO
My opinion:

Tubs are important in starter homes. Most parents bathe young children in a tub and transition them to a shower later. If you think that is your likely resale market, you want a tub somewhere. Lots of parents with young children have an inflatable tub or small hard plastic wading pool they put in the shower as a work-around to not having a tub. There are tons of young families who live in apartments that don't have tubs.

Otherwise, a soaking tub is a luxury item. A tub in a 5x8 standard bathroom is only suitable for dwarves. If you have an enormous master bedroom suite with walk-in closet, his & her sinks, and all the other frills, a big soaking tub is kind of expected.

My little 992 square foot cottage would be of little interest to a young family. If I had to sell it for some reason, my market would be empty nesters downsizing or an affluent single person / DINK couple. When I remodeled the bathroom, I made it as deluxe as I could. Radiant forced hot water heat loop in the floor. Vaulted ceiling with skylight. A built-in cupboard in the wall so I could omit the vanity I hate so much.

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Old 01-13-2016, 07:54 AM
 
Location: Edina, MN, USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by funisart View Post
A very large deep tub was a must have for our master bath. Fortunately we had the room for a huge shower also, when we remodeled our bathrooms. My husband and I can soak in the tub together and enjoy our mountain view. No need for window coverings. The tub has a surround that you can sit on to swing your legs into the tub. You cannot step into it. Hubby says that it replaces our swimming pool.

This sounds perfect.


Oh, and no hanky panky in that tub - you could drown.
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Old 01-13-2016, 07:56 AM
 
Location: Florida
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I would leave a tub in for future buyers if you have the space. A shower and tub would be ideal for resale. I personally love taking hot baths during the winter and when looking at homes we skipped over quite a few homes simply because they didnt have a tub and the cost to renovate a bathroom is substantial. My 2 cents.
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Old 01-13-2016, 08:09 AM
 
Location: Midwest transplant
2,013 posts, read 4,998,594 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jhlcomp View Post
We are remodeling the master bath in the home we just purchased. This particular home appeals to the empty nester/retirees.There is a second bathroom with a standard tub.

We are on the fence whether to keep the tub or remove it. We are mindful of resale, yet many in our age group (55-65) nix the bathtub.

What would you do? Keep the tub or remove it? Thank you in advance for your thoughts.
We were in the same position when we remodeled our most recently purchased home. Because there was a large Jacuzzi tub in the 2nd bathroom, we decided to stay with just a stand up shower in the Master. Opted for double sinks (instead of the single that was already there), upgraded medicine cabinets, and comfort height toilet seats. My one regret is that we didn't get a corner seat in the shower or recessed shelves for shampoo, razors etc. Our MBR is on the small side, but we were told by our Realtor and contractor that the majority of people in our age bracket would prefer a shower over bathtub in the Master.
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Old 01-13-2016, 08:45 AM
 
Location: Western Colorado
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Yes, and I want one of those giant tubs I can actually fit in (I'm 6'4"). I love taking a hot bubble bath on Sunday nights.
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Old 01-13-2016, 10:17 AM
 
Location: Denver CO
21,179 posts, read 11,808,808 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phonelady61 View Post
I do think tubs are an American thing . I think most Europeans prefer a shower indeed because frankly that is probably what most Europeans grew up with . I think americans grow up with tubs and therefore see a master bath as having a tub ...JMHO
My experience when I lived in Europe was the opposite - most places seemed to have a bathtub, maybe with a handheld shower extension, but often not even a shower ring with a curtain, meaning that you could take a bath, use the handheld to rinse off your hair, but if you tried standing up and "showering" you had a wet bathroom. Sometimes the room was meant to be used that way, and there was a drain in the floor but when there was a tub, there was not usually a separate floor drain and you weren't meant to get water all over the place.
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Old 01-13-2016, 11:39 AM
 
Location: SW US
2,220 posts, read 2,038,205 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phonelady61 View Post
I do think tubs are an American thing . I think most Europeans prefer a shower indeed because frankly that is probably what most Europeans grew up with . I think americans grow up with tubs and therefore see a master bath as having a tub ...JMHO
When I was doing the Europe on $5 Day thing in the 60's, the baths always had tubs and no showers. I hadn't taken tub baths since I was a kid and never liked having to sit in the tubs, which were often in shared baths.
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Old 01-13-2016, 01:42 PM
 
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I only have a walk in shower at my new place and I hate it


I only had baths a couple of times a year but when you don't have one its all you crave


also certain treatments (such as Magnesium) are applied via bathwater so it makes no sense at all for your Elderly Person
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Old 01-13-2016, 02:03 PM
 
13,944 posts, read 7,429,050 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by emm74 View Post
My experience when I lived in Europe was the opposite - most places seemed to have a bathtub, maybe with a handheld shower extension, but often not even a shower ring with a curtain, meaning that you could take a bath, use the handheld to rinse off your hair, but if you tried standing up and "showering" you had a wet bathroom. Sometimes the room was meant to be used that way, and there was a drain in the floor but when there was a tub, there was not usually a separate floor drain and you weren't meant to get water all over the place.

That's why everybody smelled "Euro"
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Old 01-13-2016, 02:10 PM
 
Location: Eastern Oregon
983 posts, read 762,623 times
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Tubs are difficult for elderly people. And they are difficult to use if you have a broken leg or have had knee surgery. We didn't have an accessible shower following one of my knee surgeries - just a tub. I spent the 8 weeks of my recovery "bathing" in the bathroom sink.

In our current house, we have a standard tub/shower in the "guest" bathroom. In the master bathroom, we have a large, custom walk in shower with grab rails. It doesn't have a door or curtain - just a large doorway with curb. If either of us ever needs a wheelchair accessible shower, we would go to a rehab facility. There is space in the bathroom where a tub could probably go. It isn't plumbed for a tub, but that probably wouldn't be too difficult. We have a nice bench there now.

We also have grab rails by the toilet, incidentally. We had blocking put in for all of the bathroom rails when we built the house. We are not (yet) elderly, but even younger people break legs, and it's easier to have the hardware in place before you need it.
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