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Old 01-17-2016, 03:23 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,945,286 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bpollen View Post
Prudential gave us a sales pitch (called a seminar) at my workplace about 8 years ago. I think the guy said that about 20% of seniors end up needing LTC, and the avg length of stay is about 2 years.

However, averages are just averages. An average means that half stay less than 2 years, and the other half stays longer.

ALSO, I THINK that Medicare rules have been revised to allow some minimal home health care, hasn't it? So if someone needs assistance with some things, but can generally be on his own for most of the time, whereas they used to have to go to a facility, now they can get by with a home health care aid for an hour a day, or however that works. For instance, assistance w/bathing or cooking or cleaning, or making sure meds are taken, a checkup on status, etc. But I'm not sure about this. Maybe someone else knows.
I think you're thinking of Medicaid home health care (experimental projects). Like we have in Florida. It's cheaper to keep a poor senior at home with home health care than placing him/her in a SNF. I'm not sure it's necessarily a good deal for an old/sick isolated senior.

Note that Medicare does for pay for some home health care stuff - like hospice care. But that is a separate issue. Robyn
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Old 01-17-2016, 03:27 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,945,286 times
Reputation: 6717
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hoot N Annie View Post
That would be "median" not "average".... (Sorry, I just can't help it.)

Here's yet another link to more data:
https://www.caregiver.org/selected-l...are-statistics

My mother & step-father, both in their 90s, moved into an independent living facility at age 90, and can segue into assisted living and nursing home and hospice care when/if needed in the same facility. Of course, it cost them about $250k to move in plus about $3k a month. Clearly this is not an option for a lot of folks.
And they will pay more/month if they need ALF or SNF care. When it comes to this stuff - TANSTAAFL. Robyn
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Old 01-17-2016, 03:47 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,945,286 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by josie13 View Post
...How accurate is the genetic testing for Alzheimer's? Is there a reliable test?
I don't know. When it comes to your mother's case - it sounds like one of those rare cases of early onset Alzheimer's. Would you want to take a test - even if it was reliable in terms of testing for genes (you are at best talking about genetic predispositions - not a certainty that you'll get a disease)? I'm not sure I would. OTOH - Angelina Jolie - one of the most beautiful famous women in the world - got her breasts lopped off due to a bad family history and bad genetic testing when it came to breast cancer. On the third hand - what do you do if your Alzheimer's genetics look bad? Lop off your brain ?

There are certain things I've seen that seem like obvious stupid things not to do IMO. Like a late uncle had a second cardiac bypass surgery to extend his life when his Alzheimer's was moderate ---> severe. So - instead of dying at home peacefully from heart disease in his late 80's - he spent the last 4-5 years of his life in a dementia dumping ground place in California and died there at age 92 or so. This is a place most people wouldn't even use as a kennel for their dogs (his family didn't have much money). If I had Alzheimer's - I don't think I would kill myself. But I wouldn't do anything extraordinary to extend my life either. Robyn
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Old 01-17-2016, 04:30 PM
 
825 posts, read 566,016 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
I don't know. When it comes to your mother's case - it sounds like one of those rare cases of early onset Alzheimer's.
It can't have been early onset Alzheimer's because she was almost 79 when she showed her first symptoms. By definition, early onset Alzheimer's is diagnosed before age 65.

Quote:
Would you want to take a test - even if it was reliable in terms of testing for genes (you are at best talking about genetic predispositions - not a certainty that you'll get a disease)? I'm not sure I would. OTOH - Angelina Jolie - one of the most beautiful famous women in the world - got her breasts lopped off due to a bad family history and bad genetic testing when it came to breast cancer. On the third hand - what do you do if your Alzheimer's genetics look bad? Lop off your brain ?
Yes, I would take a test if there were an easily identifiable genetic marker for the disease. I'm terrified of going through what my mother went through. The fear and the disorientation of watching one's powers slip away until one is completely helpless. Not knowing who people are or what is happening.

If I carried the gene and I felt the symptoms start, that would be it for me. I would take action of my own in the earlier stages, before the disease progressed too far and I didn't understand what was happening to me.

I think my children would understand because they saw what their grandmother went through.
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Old 01-17-2016, 07:20 PM
eok
 
6,684 posts, read 3,175,268 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
If I had Alzheimer's - I don't think I would kill myself. But I wouldn't do anything extraordinary to extend my life either. Robyn
If I had severe Alzheimer's past age 90, I would write a note to myself to hitchhike to the Golden Gate Bridge. Then, every time one ride ended, and I was hitching the next ride, I would look at my note to see where I wanted to go.
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Old 01-17-2016, 07:34 PM
eok
 
6,684 posts, read 3,175,268 times
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What about people who are really alone? Those who don't have close relatives or they live too far away? If you live in a senior condo, with minimal facilities to make things easier for very old people, such as metal bars in the bathroom to hold on to, elevator so you don't have to use stairs, etc., what happens when you're sick in the hospital and when you're recovering you want to go home but the doctor worries that you shouldn't be alone? Could that become a disaster because doctors have the power to send old people to assisted living or nursing homes, so you might never be able to go home, even if you would actually do ok there? Or what if you need a nursing home while recovering from an illness or accident, but while you're there, a social worker sells your condo to pay for your care, so you can never go home again, even if you recover enough to do fine there?
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Old 01-17-2016, 07:41 PM
 
6,840 posts, read 3,878,287 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by germaine2626 View Post
This phrase caught my eye. I don't believe that I know anyone, either relative, friend or acquaintance, who included grandchildren in their will. But, perhaps, you are referring to situations where it was grandchildren who did the actual caregiving.
My father included the children of a daughter who preceded him in death. They received what would have been her share to divide equally among themselves.
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Old 01-17-2016, 08:18 PM
 
Location: VT; previously MD & NJ
2,211 posts, read 1,352,704 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Harpaint View Post
My father included the children of a daughter who preceded him in death. They received what would have been her share to divide equally among themselves.
My mother left nothing to my brother but instead gave his share to his daughters. My brother blamed me for that. (Long story)
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Old 01-17-2016, 08:25 PM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
12,286 posts, read 12,525,000 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post


Assisted living is for people who need more care - help with ADLs. Especially - at least in terms of what I've seen - people suffering from dementia.
What does ADL stand for?
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Old 01-17-2016, 08:27 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,754,097 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry Caldwell View Post
What does ADL stand for?
I think it's "activities of daily living" such as showering, dressing, etc.
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