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Old 01-17-2016, 08:50 AM
 
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All these lists are meaningless because all retirees are not in the same income situation and everyone has different priorities, so what would make a place #1 for someone might not be important for someoneelse
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Old 01-17-2016, 10:57 AM
 
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Those rankings were not done with retirees in mind. Nothing about the weather, nothing about the tax burden, etc. Nothing about the cost of living more generally. Or else Hawaii would never have made the top 10!
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Old 01-17-2016, 12:32 PM
 
Location: Cochise county, AZ
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And Minnesota is very dangerously cold right now. I was out & didn't think it was too bad, but being a Minnesotan I was so bundled up you couldn't tell who I was. Sometimes it gets down right scary to be out there, especially when the weather person says it's going to be -45 with the wind chill.
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Old 01-17-2016, 12:36 PM
 
Location: Seattle Area
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ellwood View Post
Rankings based on education, health and wealth. As a retiree this listing IMO is useless. If someone is considering a place to move they should visit it for an extended period.
That's pretty narrow minded. Good schools attract better jobs and better educated parents. In turn that means less crime, better property values and better health care. As a retiree, these are useless to you?
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Old 01-17-2016, 12:47 PM
PDD
 
Location: The Sand Hills of NC
8,774 posts, read 14,880,641 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LoriNJ View Post
Those rankings were not done with retirees in mind. Nothing about the weather, nothing about the tax burden, etc. Nothing about the cost of living more generally. Or else Hawaii would never have made the top 10!
I agree, we are not concerned about good schools and many of us agree that good schools go along with higher property taxes.
Four seasons, mild winters, lots of restaurants and good medical facilities nearby were important to us.
We have little industry except for the hospitality business around golf so there are few high paying jobs.(except for medical).
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Old 01-17-2016, 01:03 PM
 
6,625 posts, read 3,756,268 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ansible90 View Post
Here's an interesting list that ranks states on various parameters. Some things to keep in mind when evaluating your retirement destination.

State of the Union 2016: The States of Our Union Are Not All Strong - POLITICO Magazine

There are 2 different charts. Scroll down.
I don't think that necessarily relates to retirement. For example, Hawaii is in the top 10, and few people could afford to retire to that state.

I think those criteria are for those who are younger and still working. It doesn't necessarily matter to a retired person who moves to a new state that a higher % of people don't read well or are obese there.

The main things that matter to me:
Property taxes
State income taxes
Cost of living
Cost of healthcare
Cost of housing

None of those things are used as criteria for those rankings in that link.
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Old 01-17-2016, 01:08 PM
 
14,264 posts, read 24,009,233 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by meo92953 View Post
And Minnesota is very dangerously cold right now. I was out & didn't think it was too bad, but being a Minnesotan I was so bundled up you couldn't tell who I was. Sometimes it gets down right scary to be out there, especially when the weather person says it's going to be -45 with the wind chill.

Right after I read the original post last night, my wife called me to take a walk through our subdivision. We counted no less than 20 vehicles with Minnesota tags.

We ended up talking to a couple from the Duluth and their impression could easily be summed up - "Minnesota is a great place to retire ... four months a year and we are not selling our summer cottage." But they are working with a CPA to establish residency in Arizona to avoid the tax burden.

Some of the coldest winter days that I have ever experienced was in Duluth in April.
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Old 01-17-2016, 01:11 PM
 
6,625 posts, read 3,756,268 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yakscsd View Post
That's pretty narrow minded. Good schools attract better jobs and better educated parents. In turn that means less crime, better property values and better health care. As a retiree, these are useless to you?
Not necessarily related. If one's concern is low crime rate, low property taxes, lower cost but good health care, there are stats for those things. One wouldn't look for good schools high rating and then assume the others will follow suit. They might. They might not. For example, in an area that has a high % of older people, the schools may well not be rated highly. But the crime stats will be low (old people commit fewer crimes), lower property taxes (for the not so good schools), and plentiful health care (since there's a built in volume of patients in the older people there).

I look at property tax rate, cost of living %, cost of health care.
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Old 01-17-2016, 01:33 PM
 
13,944 posts, read 7,429,050 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tall Traveler View Post
The truth, hard as it is for so many to accept, is that you can figure out about where these states are going to be ranked based on their racial characteristics...the top 8 are all virtually completely white, the lowest 3 states have the highest black %. Basically, if you want to live in the highly rated states, you are saying you want to live in a white dominated area.
You can change the criteria used for the ranking and make the order pretty much anything you want.

The criteria used in this particular ranking doesn't particularly apply to retirees. Most retirees have a totally different set of criteria.

I own property in #1 New Hampshire, #3 Vermont, and #6 Massachusetts. I know lots of affluent retirees in all three places. None of them are places you'd consider retiring without having high net worth or a pretty good income stream. The cost of living is simply too high.
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Old 01-17-2016, 01:44 PM
 
13,944 posts, read 7,429,050 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yakscsd View Post
That's pretty narrow minded. Good schools attract better jobs and better educated parents. In turn that means less crime, better property values and better health care. As a retiree, these are useless to you?
If you're talking about world class universities, then yeah. Otherwise, I think you have it backwards. Places with better educated affluent parents have good schools. Higher tax base. The parents are engaged and their kids probably inherited some intelligence so the average kid in the school system is more successful than in other places. If you look at any City-Data thread about "what town should I choose?", the towns people all want to live in are where the affluent people self-segregate because those have the best school systems. They also have the highest house prices so a lot of people are priced out and have to settle for a town with less engaged parents and a lower rated school system.

So the best places for that kind of criteria have the vibrant local economy that attracts the people with the high paying jobs. If you're not one of those people, it's not going to meet your personal criteria because you can't earn enough to afford to live there.

All the "where should I live?" retiree threads weigh cost of living, climate, and access to health care highly. Totally different criteria.
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