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Old 01-19-2016, 08:15 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,819 posts, read 17,734,769 times
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Echoing the fact this isn't targeted toward retirees.

When you get down to it, most of these best states are highly educated, wealthy, and relatively homogeneous, ethnically and politically. They're also fairly small states that don't reflect the nation's make-up at large.
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Old 01-19-2016, 08:41 AM
 
Location: Prescott Valley, AZ
2,771 posts, read 4,941,826 times
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I have found as I aged that heat and cold extremes bothered me a lot more than they did when I was young.
Of course when I was young AC was not common so we just did not have a choice.
I know many that say they are far less tolerant of cold and hot WX as they have aged. And of course AZ has many residents that came from the snow belt areas to retire here. I guess they were just tired of the snow? Many of them made the mistake of trying to settle in the hot zones of AZ and then moved to higher elevations to get some moderation.
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Old 01-19-2016, 12:30 PM
 
10,445 posts, read 9,434,679 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by keninaz View Post
I have found as I aged that heat and cold extremes bothered me a lot more than they did when I was young.
Of course when I was young AC was not common so we just did not have a choice.
I know many that say they are far less tolerant of cold and hot WX as they have aged. And of course AZ has many residents that came from the snow belt areas to retire here. I guess they were just tired of the snow? Many of them made the mistake of trying to settle in the hot zones of AZ and then moved to higher elevations to get some moderation.
Excellent points and I've wondered that as well for myself. . . the cold is not my friend; however, I don't want to go from one extreme to the other.
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Old 01-19-2016, 12:58 PM
 
Location: Loudon, TN
5,879 posts, read 4,892,025 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Normashirley View Post
I hope the people who can't think for themselves read this and take it to heart.

Then maybe everybody and their brother will stop saying "we're thinking of moving to Tennessee, what's it like?"

TN came in at 45 and that works for me
Works for me too. Let's just keep it our little secret.
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Old 01-19-2016, 01:19 PM
 
Location: Loudon, TN
5,879 posts, read 4,892,025 times
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One of the ways this article and its statistics fails is that it looks at each state as if it were a homogenous monolith. States are made up of smaller regions and cities. What is true in Las Vegas is not true in Elko NV. Same with Malibu vs. South Central LA, 30 miles apart and they might as well not even be the same PLANET. As others have pointed out, what seems to be of interest to the writer, math scores and infant mortality rates, have zero to do with the average retiree, or even anyone over 40. Personally I have never ever wondered about either of those statistics in any place I've ever lived.

This list seems to be very snobbish, as in "I don't want to live near any ignorant, obese, poor people". For what it's worth, there are so many former Minnesotans in my part of Tennessee that it's ridiculous.
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Old 01-19-2016, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Prescott Valley, AZ
2,771 posts, read 4,941,826 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by katie45 View Post
Excellent points and I've wondered that as well for myself. . . the cold is not my friend; however, I don't want to go from one extreme to the other.
And many from the snow belts think they can tolerate the heat of the valley. Many of them are there a couple of years and move up in elevation to get milder temperatures.
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Old 01-19-2016, 01:31 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,819 posts, read 17,734,769 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheShadow View Post
One of the ways this article and its statistics fails is that it looks at each state as if it were a homogenous monolith. States are made up of smaller regions and cities. What is true in Las Vegas is not true in Elko NV. Same with Malibu vs. South Central LA, 30 miles apart and they might as well not even be the same PLANET. As others have pointed out, what seems to be of interest to the writer, math scores and infant mortality rates, have zero to do with the average retiree, or even anyone over 40. Personally I have never ever wondered about either of those statistics in any place I've ever lived.

This list seems to be very snobbish, as in "I don't want to live near any ignorant, obese, poor people". For what it's worth, there are so many former Minnesotans in my part of Tennessee that it's ridiculous.
Those categories might not mean a lot in and of itself, but they can serve as proxies for the overall well-being of the area.

For instance, take a look at a state like Massachusetts with high educational attainment. That doesn't mean a lot for itself, but greater Boston has some of the best schools in the world. People flock there from all over for an education. Many of those folks stay in the area due to the world class companies and economy. The world class schools feed the economy, the economy attracts the best of the best, feeding the schools. You end up with a positive feedback effect and that in turn creates things like high home prices, well-educated people tend to be healthier, make better medical choices, live longer, etc.

While it may not be that important to any one individual, I think the information should at least be used as a proxy.
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Old 01-19-2016, 04:14 PM
 
Location: Central Massachusetts
4,800 posts, read 4,872,245 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
Those categories might not mean a lot in and of itself, but they can serve as proxies for the overall well-being of the area.

For instance, take a look at a state like Massachusetts with high educational attainment. That doesn't mean a lot for itself, but greater Boston has some of the best schools in the world. People flock there from all over for an education. Many of those folks stay in the area due to the world class companies and economy. The world class schools feed the economy, the economy attracts the best of the best, feeding the schools. You end up with a positive feedback effect and that in turn creates things like high home prices, well-educated people tend to be healthier, make better medical choices, live longer, etc.

While it may not be that important to any one individual, I think the information should at least be used as a proxy.
You are right. Massachusetts has some of the best schools and hospitals in the world. It is a very attractive feature to the area as well as its natural beauty. I live here so I do know. I also know that in retirement I do not want to remain here. Reasons are that I do not want to remain in an area that has a high property tax and income tax and sales tax and all the other fees and taxes. Individually they are not horrible but they do add up. On top of that is the possibility of snow storm on top of snow storm on top of more snow. It also has the potential of dumping upwards of 3 foot of wet heavy snow. Not the lake effect snow but moisture ladened wet heavy stuff. Given an advancing age moving snow to get around is increasingly tougher.

Yes there are things I could do here to remain and they will be considered, but they will also not stop me from seeking better.
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Old 01-21-2016, 03:40 AM
 
Location: R.I.
1,012 posts, read 617,128 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by golfingduo View Post
You are right. Massachusetts has some of the best schools and hospitals in the world. It is a very attractive feature to the area as well as its natural beauty. I live here so I do know. I also know that in retirement I do not want to remain here. Reasons are that I do not want to remain in an area that has a high property tax and income tax and sales tax and all the other fees and taxes. Individually they are not horrible but they do add up. On top of that is the possibility of snow storm on top of snow storm on top of more snow. It also has the potential of dumping upwards of 3 foot of wet heavy snow. Not the lake effect snow but moisture ladened wet heavy stuff. Given an advancing age moving snow to get around is increasingly tougher.

Yes there are things I could do here to remain and they will be considered, but they will also not stop me from seeking better.
I live in R.I. right over the border and pretty much are in the same situation and have the same feelings as you. This past year was property valuation time in my town. Fortunately my taxes did not go up this time around as the area I live in got the hit a couple of years back, but I did find an error on my appraisal that I needed to have corrected and the appraiser was available one Saturday to make corrections and or listen to appeals. While I was waiting to see the appraiser I watched so many seniors, some who were friends of my late parents coming in to see the appraiser very distressed. Many of these individuals were in their late 70s and 80s living in modest homes some inherited from their parents long paid for, and because of their outrageous property taxes they were on the brink of loosing their homes so they were there to appeal their valuations. One man in his late 80s who I was chatting with as we were waiting to see the appraiser was telling me he had lived through the Great Depression, and remembers standing in line with my late mother waiting to get their handouts of cheese, beans, etc. This man went on to say that he was able to rise up from childhood poverty through hard blue collar factory work, being frugal, and although he never made a lot of money prided himself on having been able to purchase and pay for a small home and send 3 kids to college. Never did he imagine that in his senior years he could possibly loose his paid for home because the annual taxes were now more than what he paid for his home which was $8,000.

This was a sad and sobering experience for me seeing these distressed seniors who worked hard for many years, supported themselves and their families on their own dime often with much sacrifice, and in their golden years have to worry about being able to have the basic necessities of life
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Old 01-22-2016, 09:29 AM
 
Location: Loudon, TN
5,879 posts, read 4,892,025 times
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So many retirees are living on a tight fixed income, and that's the reason we see other lists like "10 best places to retire". Most of these lists are useless because the criteria used to rank the states, or cities, are not the same values held by the reader. And once again, ranking an entire state by something like infant mortality or crime rate is nonsense because it varies so widely between individual cities and regions within the state. Even within the boundaries of an individual metropolis you can't cite an individual statistic and expect it to be valid across the board. South Central and Beverly Hills are both still considered part of "LA" but they sure as heck don't have the same crime rate.
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