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Old 01-24-2016, 06:23 AM
 
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A dear friend of mine is 84. She just had heart surgery. I stopped by her house to see how she was doing (she lives in a 3000 square foot house on 10 acres by herself), and she was out back weeding. Its unusual to catch her home, shes always running to town doing something. She's planned on a European tour with some friends for this coming April.

When I grow up I want to be like her.
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Old 01-24-2016, 06:39 AM
 
Location: Central NY
4,700 posts, read 3,268,911 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Soup Nazi View Post
I find this article especially interesting as I worked on the racetrack (primarily NY and FL tracks) for twenty years, and was always impressed by the number of older people still working. I've known several trainers who worked well into their 80's, and plenty of exercise riders still galloping horses in their 60's (my ex is one). A life of working outdoors and the level of fitness involved must be a contributing factor, though I also think that loving what you do can't hurt. I remember waking up in the wee hours and being excited about going to work, and actually looking forward to it, and no job since has given me that level of satisfaction.
I have thought in my older years that it would be so satisfying to work with horses. Of course, I never have done so, I have no training, no special skills. But I so admire the animal.
I have never had a job that inspired me or made me anxious to get there. Almost always worked in an office setting, answer phones, type letters and reports, make reservations for others who are traveling, etc. Boring with a capital B.
At my age (April I'll be 74), I doubt I would be of much help but I do enjoy looking at them. I was in VT in October and had occasion to stop by a display of various plants and flowers, how to make cider, etc. While there I saw two gorgeous horses that were waiting to pull a wagon with people in it. They were magnificent. Can't remember the kind of horses they were. But I gingerly walked up to them, didn't want to frighten them, talked to them a little and eventually petted their faces. I was in heaven, at least for a little while.
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Old 01-24-2016, 01:56 PM
 
Location: Vermont
371 posts, read 398,355 times
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Originally Posted by NYgal2NC View Post
At my age (April I'll be 74), I doubt I would be of much help but I do enjoy looking at them. I was in VT in October and had occasion to stop by a display of various plants and flowers, how to make cider, etc. While there I saw two gorgeous horses that were waiting to pull a wagon with people in it. They were magnificent. Can't remember the kind of horses they were. But I gingerly walked up to them, didn't want to frighten them, talked to them a little and eventually petted their faces. I was in heaven, at least for a little while.
I bet they were draft horses, most likely Belgians. Gentle giants. Though my years on the track delayed my making any decent salary for far too many years, looking back, I don't regret it. I have so many wonderful memories of so many amazing horses. I was lucky to have seen the great ones. And nothing else has ever compared to the thrill of riding a thoroughbred at full gallop...well, except maybe that scary old Cyclone coaster on Coney Island, which I still insist on riding whenever I am there...!
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Old 01-25-2016, 03:42 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Nor'Eastah View Post
My question to you is: would you want to live to the age of 94-95? Why, or why not?
I'm 67 and am healthy, fit, and active. My life is busy and I enjoy it.
But if I die tomorrow, that's good. I don't in the least fear death. I do fear losing my independence and faculties, and most of all I'm terrified at the idea of becoming a burden on others.
I agree with the philosophy that it's better to die 10 years too young than live 10 minutes too old.
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Old 01-25-2016, 04:03 AM
 
10,824 posts, read 8,090,324 times
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Originally Posted by Nor'Eastah View Post
Yes! The "DNR" or "No Code" printed on a piece of MedicAlert jewelry, will save you from a lot of nastiness, if they "catch you" before any family or POA shows up. If you become alert, you can always verbally override it.
DNR's basically mean "don't call 911". Emergency responders are not bound by DNRs, their job is to save lives, and they WILL attempt to resuscitate, even if you wave the DNR in their faces.
If you're in a hospital, DNRs and No Code's should be honored provided you've dotted the i's and crossed the t's. Make sure. Ask questions ahead of time.
If you're in a SNF or ALC, make sure you know exactly what the policy is re calling 911. We're in the process of clarifying this re my MIL. Even with the DNR and living will in place, it's dicey. If it's a sudden event involving pain (fall, broken leg), then yes they call 911 first, then the family. If it's a sudden event involving what appears to be cardiac malfunction or arrest, we want them to call us and not 911. We have a meeting set up next week to discuss this, not sure it'll accomplish anything.

MIL does not have enough cognitive function to make these decisions. What we've learned so far from this is that living wills and DNRs aren't worth much.
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Old 01-25-2016, 08:33 AM
 
Location: Over yonder a piece
3,923 posts, read 4,666,712 times
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My grandmother had an incredible quality of life up until her sudden death just a couple months shy of 100 years old. It was really only around age 98 that she started showing her age (mild balance issues, short-term memory loss).

I'd be perfectly content to live to be that old if I had the same robust health and attitude that my grandmother had.
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