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Old 01-24-2016, 03:11 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
11,177 posts, read 20,549,221 times
Reputation: 26501

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Quote:
Originally Posted by yellowsnow View Post
Me too! And I also get them from e-bay. I keep Fish Mox in the fridge all the time!
I used to get them from ebay, but I've switched to Countryside Pet. They're good to keep on hand for your pets too...they only sell them for fish and birds without a prescription, but you can use them on dogs too. I also keep some meds on hand for my guinea pigs, because it's very expensive to take a guinea pig to the vet. Ironically, I've never needed antibiotics for my fish, despite buying a few bottles of fish antibiotics over the years.



My mom gets frequent UTI's and won't go to the doctor for them, so we keep the appropriate antibiotics on hand, and we keep UTI test strips too.
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Old 01-24-2016, 04:26 PM
 
9,417 posts, read 6,298,119 times
Reputation: 17800
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
Until a few days ago I had never paid more than $10 for a prescription drug. Then my doctor switched me to an extended release version of the same drug I had been taking, and the cost was $30. Three times cheap does not equal horribly expensive of course, but it is still triple the cost, so it caught my attention.

I do realize that talking drug prices is more about the medical coverage one has than about the actual prices of the drugs themselves on the open market. The prices cited above are my co-pays, and the $30 was for a three-month supply. Still, I used to get a three-month supply for $10.

I also realize that my topic may be of no interest to many folks because they are not on any prescription drugs, but I have a genetically substandard body in a bunch of respects and at 71 I have been on one drug since my 50's with a second one added four or five years ago. I don't like it, but it is what it is, namely a consequence of aging in my particular case. But I feel like a freak of nature.

Why did doc switch? You may be no better off for more money.

I'm an RPh and always recommend that my patients stay with the least expensive dose over the extended release unless there is a compelling reason to switch. Hell, I just made my own doc switch me from 1 a day extended release heart med to twice daily dose of same product instant release.
Last year my insurance covered ER. Not this year.
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Old 01-24-2016, 05:07 PM
 
Location: Greenville, SC
4,679 posts, read 3,723,298 times
Reputation: 8717
Sorry, I keep thinking of this Seinfeld episode.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wXeV5cqb_3Y
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Old 01-24-2016, 05:59 PM
 
5,432 posts, read 3,467,201 times
Reputation: 13714
I've found that one of the Extended Release Metoprolol 200mg works massively better and is far more effective than taking non-extended release Metoprolol tablets 100mg twice a day.

So this convinced me that there is great merit, perhaps for some drugs, with taking Extended Release tablets.
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Old 01-24-2016, 06:24 PM
 
Location: Ohio
19,995 posts, read 14,280,686 times
Reputation: 16159
Quote:
Originally Posted by canadian citizen View Post
On average, the retail price of prescription drugs in Canada, compared to the same drug in the USA, is 50 to 80 percent less.
Drugs cost whatever they cost, and Americans are subsidizing prescription drugs in foreign States like Canada.

Quote:
The pan-Canadian Pharmaceutical Alliance has completed more than 89 negotiations on brand-name drugs and price reductions on 14 generic drugs, producing a savings of more than $490 million annually.
89 brand name drugs and 14 generic drugs is not a lot given the total number of brand-names and generics available.
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Old 01-24-2016, 06:29 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,775,806 times
Reputation: 32309
Quote:
Originally Posted by mike1003 View Post
Why did doc switch? You may be no better off for more money.

I'm an RPh and always recommend that my patients stay with the least expensive dose over the extended release unless there is a compelling reason to switch. Hell, I just made my own doc switch me from 1 a day extended release heart med to twice daily dose of same product instant release.
Last year my insurance covered ER. Not this year.
I am better off with the extended release and I agreed to the change. My scedule is rarely the same from day to day and I often couldn't remember to take the second daily pill. I usually wasn't at home and it was a huge hassle. I have only been on the extended release for five days, but it is a marvelous convenience. I am almost always at home for breakfast, and my routine includes taking the pills. Then that's it for 24 hours! I love it.
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Old 01-24-2016, 08:19 PM
 
Location: VT; previously MD & NJ
2,230 posts, read 1,366,335 times
Reputation: 6455
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
...
I also realize that my topic may be of no interest to many folks because they are not on any prescription drugs, but I have a genetically substandard body in a bunch of respects and at 71 I have been on one drug since my 50's with a second one added four or five years ago. I don't like it, but it is what it is, namely a consequence of aging in my particular case. But I feel like a freak of nature.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
I am sorry about your situation, which is quite inconceivable to me. Indeed, my prices are quite reasonable. But my real complaint is not the prices but the bitter disappointment and humiliation I feel at being on prescription drugs. This is the first time I have been able to admit publicly to being on drugs, sort of like going to confession, I guess. Old age sucks big time.

I suppose the tripling of the price for the same drug in a time-release version was just symbolic of my frustration at being on the drug in the first place.
I understand the feeling: why can't my body just work like it's supposed to? like it used to? Many years ago when I first started taking prescription meds, I accepted it. I thought about how many additional decades my mother lived because there were meds to keep her going. So intellectually I knew the meds were a good thing.

But at some point, I started getting upset because I felt so dependent. I was taking all these pills and had to wear eye glasses too. It was the eye glasses that tripped me up. I remember thinking: Not only do I have to take all these the pills, but I can't even see anymore without the glasses. It's like, you know you have to do this and you know it will extend your life and help you live better, but having to be so dependent is the hardest thing to accept.
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Old 01-24-2016, 08:24 PM
 
5,432 posts, read 3,467,201 times
Reputation: 13714
false and misplaced pride
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Old 01-24-2016, 08:46 PM
 
2,635 posts, read 3,385,246 times
Reputation: 6976
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mircea View Post
Drugs cost whatever they cost, and Americans are subsidizing prescription drugs in foreign States like Canada.
.

We actually subsidize prescription drugs for the ENTIRE WORLD.

The US does the most drug development and basic science research leading to drug development in the world. Then we pay the highest prices to buy the drugs that we develop, and pay the highest for health care in the world.

It is this way because we ALLOW it.

I think our biomedical research and academic talents in this country are incredible and much of the talent in the world wants to come here to train and work to be a part of it. We don't want to stifle this. We just have to figure out how to come together to help subsidize drug development on a WORLD SCALE so that we all benefit, yet we don't pay for it all......

The WORLD is very happy to allow us to continue on, as we are.

And until we complain more and ask our politicians to remove the legal restraints so that Medicare can negotiate with drug companies to pay lower rates on medications.... nothing will change in that regard.
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Old 01-24-2016, 10:15 PM
 
4,456 posts, read 2,634,203 times
Reputation: 10410
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
Until a few days ago I had never paid more than $10 for a prescription drug. Then my doctor switched me to an extended release version of the same drug I had been taking, and the cost was $30. Three times cheap does not equal horribly expensive of course, but it is still triple the cost, so it caught my attention.

I do realize that talking drug prices is more about the medical coverage one has than about the actual prices of the drugs themselves on the open market. The prices cited above are my co-pays, and the $30 was for a three-month supply. Still, I used to get a three-month supply for $10.

I also realize that my topic may be of no interest to many folks because they are not on any prescription drugs, but I have a genetically substandard body in a bunch of respects and at 71 I have been on one drug since my 50's with a second one added four or five years ago. I don't like it, but it is what it is, namely a consequence of aging in my particular case. But I feel like a freak of nature.
My plan just changed. I have quite a few needed scripts. has little to do with aging, though in my 50s I certainly take a lot more meds than when i was 25.

When I went to fill my first script at the local pharmacy chain, she mussed about something and i said should be about $3. SHe said "Oh, i think it's going to be a LOT more than you think!". I was shocked the med had gone from $3.50 co pay to $279!!!!!

that was Last January when My co-pays went from $350 a YEAR {$350.00} the previous year, to $575 a MONTH { $6,900.00}!!!! AND I had to switch "preferred pharmacies" to one farther away to boot.

This year to combat it, the local hospital system we go to has a Patient aid program. People/families can earn up to $75k a year and still get a 25% discount off their services. We qualify at 100% discount {poverty +350%} ,and that comes with a $1000 credit towards prescription co-pays now. SO now I can get some help with the scripts.

GRRR. Don't get me started on health care costs....
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