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Old 01-25-2016, 09:52 AM
 
Location: Gulf Coast
1,165 posts, read 653,408 times
Reputation: 2274

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Hm, never bothered me before I read this thread!

I prefer Better Half. I always hated the Old Lady designation for wife. Young people do that and I find it disrespectful.

Other thing I dislike is when people forget things they say they have Oldtimer's disease. While it may be true, I don't like hearing it.

Here in retirement land, we hear Senior Citizen a lot. That's ok, if a bit formal. I wonder if countries that revere their elderly more than Americans do use these terms for their older population?
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Old 01-25-2016, 12:41 PM
 
5,431 posts, read 3,459,869 times
Reputation: 13714
indicative of how trashy, crude, crass, coarse, oafish, and very low in intellect some people in the U.S. are or have become

a societal indicator culturally and sociologically

Last edited by matisse12; 01-25-2016 at 12:58 PM..
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Old 01-25-2016, 01:46 PM
 
Location: Long Neck , DE
4,903 posts, read 3,040,936 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by P47P47 View Post
I knew I was officially a geezer when my employer hired a new engineer who had been born after I'd started working there.
How about when they are the same age as your grandchild??
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Old 01-25-2016, 02:05 PM
 
6,034 posts, read 13,143,752 times
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I don't use those terms but I do hear older people referring to themselves or others in those ways. My grandparents, for example, called each other all kinds of rude names. To them it was cute or funny. I think maybe it's like the "n" word to describe a Black person or a person of any culture who has low standards. Certain people can use it and have it not be offensive, but other people not so much. It's the way certain words are used, and by whom, I think that makes a big difference. Just like describing something as gay or calling someone gay. I have heard gay people call things gay or tell each other how they are "so gay"... but if a straight person says stuff like that, it can be seen as offensive. Language is tricky like that sometimes. Personally I feel it's better to not use controversial words and just try to keep the language polite at all times. What I or the people I'm with may think is funny or cute, may really upset someone else. So I think it's best to try to be respectful and avoid using that type of language at all.
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Old 01-25-2016, 02:53 PM
 
5,226 posts, read 5,104,825 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by longneckone View Post
How about when they are the same age as your grandchild??
That will have to remain a matter of speculation for me.
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Old 01-25-2016, 02:56 PM
 
Location: Central NY
4,686 posts, read 3,258,145 times
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I have never given a whole lot of thought about these terms used to describe older people (I'm one of them!!).

However, what irritates the heck out of me is how blatantly people throw that F word around. How did that get to be so "popular?" That is the "big one" for me.
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Old 01-25-2016, 02:58 PM
 
1,592 posts, read 893,333 times
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I had a supervisor call me kiddo. I called him grandpa in response. The kiddo stuff ended immediately haha.


So for whoever here said that it's more insulting to be called young, I agree.
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Old 01-25-2016, 03:55 PM
 
Location: Idaho
2,512 posts, read 2,284,519 times
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I've been called a lot worse than "old fart."
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Old 01-25-2016, 04:37 PM
 
2,563 posts, read 2,796,477 times
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Most young people must think that they'll never be old.

I once knew a girl who was about 28 at the time. She once told me a story about her "old fart" mother who was 50. Anyway, I saw the girl on Facebook the other day. I think she's now around 50. I wonder if she thinks she's old?
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Old 01-25-2016, 05:28 PM
 
1,056 posts, read 971,906 times
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The only time I've ever heard these terms used is by old people, usually in description of themself or their spouse. I've never heard it used by someone who wasn't old.
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