U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-19-2016, 02:54 PM
 
197 posts, read 161,521 times
Reputation: 1122

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jukesgrrl View Post
It's not population 60,000 but I'd suggest Pittsburgh, PA. It has six universities and a community college system within the city limits, many of which are welcoming to retirees auditing classes when they are not at peak enrollment and attending all manner of activities, including lectures, seminars, poetry and prose readings, plays (Carnegie-Mellon has a famous theater department), and needless to say sports. The Osher Lifelong Learning Institute is active at both Pitt and CMU.

Other cultural amenities abound thanks to MANY museums ranging from natural history to space science to art. Speaking of art, an incredible arts community including visual artists, musicians, theater artists, and writers (I'd bet on more published authors per capita outside of maybe DC). There are several contemporary arts organizations such as The Mattress Factory where the public can interact with cutting edge artists.
Greater Pittsburgh Arts Council
Trust Arts | The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust

Pittsburgh also has world-class health facilities (University of Pittsburgh Medical Center pioneered transplant surgery) and for orthopedic issues the most innovative sports medicine facility in the nation, led by pioneering Dr. Freddie Fu.
Pittsburgh Hospitals & Healthcare | Moving to Pittsburgh PA

Also directly related to your wish list:
Water - Three rivers, clean and beautiful. Boating of every type. A 13-mile riverfront park system features walking trails and bike paths and recently even featured a detour around a nest hatching baby bald eagles.
Riverfront Projects

Wild Life
- If you lived in a close-in suburb you could have deer and other wildlife in your yard. Pittsburgh is surrounded by forests and hills. The city is super-green with many huge parks and such an active chapter of the Nature Conservancy the national organization has a satellite office there.
Citiparks | Welcome
There is also a well-respected zoo and The National Aviary, associated with the Smithsonian, is located on Pittsburgh's North Side.

Progressive Politics - Pittsburgh has a Democratic mayor and majority city council. A national study done by some academic political scientists rated Pittsburgh the 19th most liberal city in the nation, describing it as a "dark blue spot in a purple state." Racial minorities are represented in city council, the LGBT community is an important part of the city, and all religions seem to be represented and respected. Of course, Pittsburgh has a long history of union activism. But even Republicans are welcome. The recently deceased Elsie Hillman was a nationally famous GOP stalwart, beloved in Pittsburgh for her philanthropic activities.

You didn't mention housing. Whether you're interested in a river-view condominium in the city, a historic home that you could rehab or has already been modernized, a warehouse loft, or a typical suburban house, Pittsburgh has among the most affordable housing in the U.S. Northeast. But it's not because the housing market is depressed. Since 2000, home values in Pittsburgh have increased an average of 4% per year.

My personal reasons to love Pittsburgh:
The Phipps Conservatory
The Pittsburgh Steelers and the Pittsburgh Pirates and their nationally recognized facilities
The world-class Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra
Pittsburgh Ballet Theater
The Strip District for amazing food shopping
Live theater from experimental to Shakespeare to Broadway touring companies
The innovative Pittsburgh Irish and Classical Theatre
The city's ethnic pride
Free concerts galore all over the city and a wide range of national musical acts visiting the city
Neighborhood festivals on-going all summer
You can easily drive to DC, Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York City, Toronto, and Cleveland for weekend excursions
Pittsburgh's best-kept secret: the active and enthusiastic blues scene highlighted by the annual summer Blues Festival

If you really are dedicated to small-town living and would reject living in an urban area, some towns within a short drive of downtown Pittsburgh have old-fashioned main streets and enough amenities you would never have to leave unless you wanted to take advantage of some of the city's culture. Check out Mt. Lebanon, Aspinwall, Oakmont, Brentwood, and Sewickley. Tons of nice houses, trees everywhere, close to the rivers, and great walk-rates in each.

Pittsburgh is on the list of Best Places to Retire created by Forbes, Kiplinger, Money.com, WalletHub, BankRate, Yahoo Finance, ABC News, Movoto, Huffington Post, and AARP.

More info:
Pittsburgh City Living - Top Ten
I couldn't agree more. Pittsburgh is a wonderful city that reinvented itself. It is a great American can- do success story. I think it would be a brilliant place to which to retire.

Last edited by Yac; 09-13-2018 at 05:40 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-19-2016, 04:07 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,976,764 times
Reputation: 6724
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jareb View Post
Back east with water nearby and progressive.....many options available. You might want to check out Gainesville Florida. It has the Univ of Florida; 45,000+ students. It is 1 hr from the Atlantic Ocean and 1 hr from the Gulf of Mexico. Outstanding health care in Shands Medical Center. Hot in summer and nice in winter. Reasonable real estate. Incredible wildlife and outdoor activities.
Gainesville is really a small city - not a town.

And you're off on your estimates of travel times to beaches (as opposed to just being near bodies of water that aren't road accessible - especially on the Gulf side of the state). You're pretty much talking about 90 minutes+ to beaches on the Atlantic - and over an hour to Cedar Key (not known for its beaches). Not day trips IMO - especially for older retired people. Gainesville is kind of centrally isolated - much like Ithaca.

IMO - Gainesville - like places like Ithaca - is - in a lot of parts - kind of "grubby" - like Ithaca. Places with lots of college students/college housing tend to be grubby.

When it comes to weather in Florida - inland places like Gainesville tend to be colder in the winter than places on the coast - and hotter in the summer (with the Atlantic Coast being a touch cooler than the Gulf coast).

I live about 2 hours from Gainesville - and could never see myself living there.

Another Florida small college city to look at too might be Tallahassee (home of FSU). I like Tallahassee a bit more than Gainesville - but not much. Couldn't see myself living there either. Robyn
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-19-2016, 04:12 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,976,764 times
Reputation: 6724
Quote:
Originally Posted by ukgirl49 View Post
I couldn't agree more. Pittsburgh is a wonderful city that reinvented itself. It is a great American can- do success story. I think it would be a brilliant place to which to retire.
Guess it's ok if you don't mind cold weather/snow/ice - being locked in your house during the winter. We were talking with a golf ranger at our course who hailed from Pittsburgh the other day. He came here when he retired. The older you get - the harder it is to deal with cold weather/snow/ice. At least for most people. Although individual mileage can of course vary. Robyn
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-19-2016, 04:39 PM
 
197 posts, read 161,521 times
Reputation: 1122
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
Guess it's ok if you don't mind cold weather/snow/ice - being locked in your house during the winter. We were talking with a golf ranger at our course who hailed from Pittsburgh the other day. He came here when he retired. The older you get - the harder it is to deal with cold weather/snow/ice. At least for most people. Although individual mileage can of course vary. Robyn
I see your point but in Florida and such places I would be locked in my house in the summer!

There have been many threads about the perfect place and the consensus seems to be that , with the possible exception of Hawaii, no where is ideal for the whole twelve months of the year.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-20-2016, 06:04 AM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,976,764 times
Reputation: 6724
Quote:
Originally Posted by ukgirl49 View Post
I see your point but in Florida and such places I would be locked in my house in the summer!

There have been many threads about the perfect place and the consensus seems to be that , with the possible exception of Hawaii, no where is ideal for the whole twelve months of the year.
I guess different people have different tolerances for heat/humidity (as well as different reactions to the cold). Personally - I don't find myself locked in the house in the afternoon in August. OTOH - I'm not going to go out and play tennis at 2 pm either (although golf and gardening are ok). The biggest problem I have with cold weather (and we get some here in NE Florida) is not being able to "warm up" my muscles. So I'm always afraid of of aches/pains/strains/sprains when trying to do something like swing a golf club. Robyn
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-20-2016, 10:54 AM
JRR
 
Location: Middle Tennessee
3,694 posts, read 2,240,752 times
Reputation: 5264
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlawrence01 View Post
Cookeville is a college town, home of the Tennessee Technical University. It is one of the more progressive towns in the region.

As for state parks, these parks are a short drive away.

Cummins Falls State Park — Tennessee State Parks
Standing Stone State Park — Tennessee State Parks
Burgess Falls State Park — Tennessee State Parks
Fall Creek Falls State Park — Tennessee State Parks
Rock Island State Park — Tennessee State Parks

On the national forests and parks, you have the following options:

Daniel Boone National Forest - Districts
USDA Forest Service - SOPA - Cherokee National Forest
Great Smoky Mountains National Park (U.S. National Park Service)

I went down to Cookeville, TN in October 2013 as it was at the top of my list of potential retirement locations. The reasons: good climate, lower taxes, local university, nearby hiking locations.

I was down there for three days and I met a good number of people from Ohio, Michigan, and Indiana who were looking at Cookeville as a retirement location. I am not sure that there are any large retirement communities in that area but it is an area drawing a lot of retirees.
That is where we are heading. It has pretty much all the things we wanted for our retirement. Hope to have the house built and be moved in by next January.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-20-2016, 10:57 AM
JRR
 
Location: Middle Tennessee
3,694 posts, read 2,240,752 times
Reputation: 5264
Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigCreek View Post
Berea, Kentucky, home of Berea College and the Arts and Crafts Capitol of Kentucky. The Kentucky River borders Madison County; Laurel Lake and Lake Cumberland are about an hour away. Mountains to the south and east of town; Lexington 45 miles up I-75. Also a center for traditional music and dance - see Christmas Country Dance School videos on YouTube.
We visited Berea when we were checking places out for our retirement. I really like the town, the people and the area. But for some reason it just didn't click with my wife.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-21-2016, 08:05 AM
 
Location: Midwest transplant
2,013 posts, read 5,007,276 times
Reputation: 1570
I'll suggest East Lansing, MI. Home of Michigan State University and just 3 miles from Lansing, the State Capital. Population 47,000 until the students return and then it doubles. Two major hospitals, plus just a little over an hour to U of M or fantastic health care facilities in Grand Rapids. Tons of lakes nearby and the state of Michigan boasts that you are never more than 80 miles from one of the great lakes. Housing is affordable, there are 3 airports within reasonable distance, and there is a shuttle service to the Detroit airport that is dependable, efficient and inexpensive. Cost of living is lower (car insurance is the biggest sticker shock). Train service to Chicago runs daily. There are communities and condos (not necessarily over 55, but attractive to active retirees) as well as continuing care communities and senior apartments.

The downfall is the winter weather. If you're able to escape for 3 months to a warmer climate, the other 9 are pleasant.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-22-2016, 12:30 PM
 
763 posts, read 1,642,650 times
Reputation: 405
Asheville NC
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-23-2016, 03:12 PM
 
2,372 posts, read 648,936 times
Reputation: 2482
Have you considered Williamsburg, Va?


COLLEGE TOWN: The College of William & Mary is located in the center of this lovely community.


PROGRESSIVE: hmmm: Thomas Jefferson frequented it as did many other progressive thinkers, but perhaps you are looking for something more recent than the 18th C Hard to label it or determine exactly how individuals define progressive, but it has many amenities that are urban updated and numerous intellectual circles. Myriad programs through the college as well as the CW Foundation( Colonial Williamsburg) High population of very active and engaged retirees. For larger cities to haunt you have, Richmond Va a mere 30- 45 minutes away; Washington D.C at 2 hours and very progressive dependent upon your political persuasion, I'd say


NEAR WATER: It is on a peninsula between the James & York Rivers; close to the Chesapeake Bay; less than an hour to Virginia Beach...Atlantic Ocean; 2 hours to the beautiful Atlantic Ocean beaches of the Outer Banks of North Carolina. River walking easy, tranquil and breathtaking because of the protected federal and state lands etc. From any neighborhood in Williamsburg ( if you are not actually on the river) I"d estimate that you are never more than 15 minutes away from a beach or access point to start a stroll or hike, your choice.


ANIMAL/WILDLIFE: The entire Historic Triangle (which is Williamsburg, Jamestown & Yorktown) has achieved a delightful preservation of the area and the natural aspects( of which there are MANY) are a treasure.


MEDICAL RESOURCES: This is an affluent community and they have med care.( 2 hospitals) If one desires or needs super-heavy-hitting specialties, Johns Hopkins is right up I95 in under 2 hours; but there also is The Medical College of Virginia in Richmond and two systems of Med Centers from Newport News & Norfolk are represented in Williamsburg proper.


We actually retired in wonderful Williamsburg for 4.5 years and I appreciated it & LOVED every minute of it...felt like vacation. Colonial Williamsburg was within walking distance as was the college and the market area and the beauty of this town and the historic area is stunning. Always something to do, always somewhere to entertain guests and on and on.Housing is absolutely beautiful. We would still be there if our little darlings ( who were living in D.C & Northern Virginia when we retired) had not each moved to Pennsylvania, taking the grand-babies with them. So we searched and found a new way of retirement closer to family, but I am longing for Virginia and Colonial Williamsburg! However the hugs of our bugs are great!!!!


Even if you choose not to retire to the town, it is really worth a visit to this part of the country....best of luck. Feel free to contact me personally if you have any specific questions etc.

Last edited by corpgypsy; 02-23-2016 at 03:35 PM.. Reason: clarity
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top