U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 02-03-2016, 03:17 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
12,764 posts, read 7,826,042 times
Reputation: 13083

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by matisse12 View Post
Your screed does not dispute that. In fact, it confirms it. 11,000 workers in one state who are in the office and clerical category is not a small number of workers.
Pennsylvania has a population of around 13 million. Seventy thousand (eleven thousand clerical) is not a large number when compared to the total population of ONE state.

Washington D.C. has a population of less than 700,000.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-03-2016, 03:32 PM
 
37 posts, read 34,677 times
Reputation: 163
Quote:
Originally Posted by newcomputer View Post
I couldn't read the whole article. Something about my computer.


But I think these people have choices. These are the ones they choose, just like people of all ages. Unless the other two people are in much worse shape than the first lady (as far as I got), I'm not worried.
Aches and pains come with age for some of us. She looks to be in pretty fair shape.

I don't want the debt of "storage". That's what I'm working on now. Getting pictures and docs online and letting go of stuff. One day I hope to be free of possessions. Then, when its just me and my check every month, I will explore the possibilities.


In the meantime, I am as happy as I ever was.


Okay. I got to finish reading. What I think is this: these people are living the life they have lived for much of their lives. The spin is that they are at an age where people expect to be living the good life. Retired! Until I started reading this forum, I really didn't think that retirement meant anything more than the end of your working life, for whatever reason. Choice, health, losing job and unable to find another, etc.


I liked the lady who said that work did not define her. I've always felt this way. I decide if the job is worth doing for what it will pay me. I have done all sorts of things part time while working at my regular, socially acceptable job that my education provided the skills for. Cleaning for the phone company was a favorite because I could go anytime and it paid well enough, but I also cleaned for real estate companies and individuals. I have delivered telephone books. (That was a hard one ) Can't remember everything but I have done some interesting things. Waited tables until I turned 30 and decided I didn't want to deal with the public anymore.


I had someone be rude to me once when I was working the night shift in a grocery. I remember looking up at her, surprised, and then I thought, "Oh. You don't know who I am. You feel comfortable being rude because you are on the other side of the counter. I am happy to be here because it is an extra paycheck."


I doubt I will change much, just like the people in the article seem to be living a life fairly close to the way they have always lived.
.
Sorry man, but seems to me you are writing just random thoughts. Try to focus on the topic
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-03-2016, 04:00 PM
 
Location: Loudon, TN
5,785 posts, read 4,838,667 times
Reputation: 19458
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlaskaErik View Post
I don't live in a fantasy world. I live in a world that I worked hard for and prepared for all during my working career.
As do I. I worked myself up through the ranks (quite literally, since I served in the Air Force in my early career) and from a low level entry job in public service to a manager of multi-million dollar programs earning 6 figures. And I still cannot even imagine how someone could think that $10k per month is needed for a decent living in retirement. I personally think we live a pretty awesome retirement lifestyle on half that, and we still pay a mortgage and have money left over at the end of the month to invest (Sorry, not intending to brag but trying to make a point to AlaskaErik). Over 95% of the retired world lives on far, far less than $10K/month. If you can't live on less, I find that really strange.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-03-2016, 04:17 PM
 
37 posts, read 34,677 times
Reputation: 163
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
Disgustedman, yup, I think the issue is clear. Regardless of desire, the average family is getting by and saving for retirement is tough if not impossible. The best we seem to do in offering a solution is to recommend avoiding debt and living on less while saving more. Sounds great but more and more families cannot accomplish this. My "political" view is clear. As long as our citizens are struggling to get by, we need to stop the politicians who think the well is bottomless. We also need to stop the politicians who want to police and sell democracy to the rest of the world. We should have plenty of resources available to rebuild infrastructure, and to make it easier for families to get by with day care, healthcare and social security benefits. USA first. When we try to help the rest of the world with tens of billions in aid, the money seems to be wasted and the recipients are resentful and do not trust us.
Just to let you know my friend, that "aid" is 90% military aid.

No wonder the recipients are resentful as in most cases that aid just supports the military and the corrupt elites.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-03-2016, 05:25 PM
 
2,675 posts, read 4,537,581 times
Reputation: 2131
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlaskaErik View Post
If you'd talk to a real economist, and not a political hack with an agenda, you'd find that the minimum wage does more harm than good.
Not true. There is a huge body of research on the effects of raising the minimum wage, and it does not show that the net effects are negative. Some of the research shows an unemployment effect; some does not. And many other consequences are measured in some studies. Check it out; as a retiree you have time to research it online or go to your library. If you're unwilling to do that, you won't have any credibility. But at least check out the unemployment rates in cities and states that have minimum wages above the federal standard. You'll see they tend to be LOWER, not higher.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-03-2016, 05:27 PM
 
2,675 posts, read 4,537,581 times
Reputation: 2131
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fox Terrier View Post
Pennsylvania has a population of around 13 million. Seventy thousand (eleven thousand clerical) is not a large number when compared to the total population of ONE state.

Washington D.C. has a population of less than 700,000.
That's only within the city limits, which are very restricted. The metro area has about 5 million.

On edit: Make that 6+ million:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Washin...ropolitan_area

Last edited by ACWhite; 02-03-2016 at 06:29 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-03-2016, 06:15 PM
 
Location: Amongst the AZ Cactus
7,074 posts, read 4,925,427 times
Reputation: 7701
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clemencia53 View Post
Saw this article in the LA Times and wondered what y'all would think.

http://graphics.latimes.com/retireme...t=notification

Three stories of older Americans still working menial jobs just to survive. They say they were the victims of the 2008 recession.

One lady is 79 and drives all over the country from seasonal job to seasonal job.

Well, they all do. The other stories involve two couples. Surprisingly one man receives a 2700 a month military pension, disability and another stipend. But I guess they also have a lot of unpaid debt.
I say the vast majority of people are "victims" of their own choices.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-03-2016, 08:07 PM
 
806 posts, read 1,269,867 times
Reputation: 439
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYgal2NC View Post
Someone in an earlier post mentioned that they had used a credit counseling company to help them with their debt and that they paid this company $8 per month.

I recently contacted a similar type company for help with the debt I am carrying and they told me they would charge $50 per month.

I decided if I were to pay them $50 per month, there would not be a lot left over to pay on the part of the debt I would still need to pay after their "help."
It's been awhile since I followed this post. Boy, the discussion has gone far. I'm the one who used Genus Credit to whittle down my credit card debt. Yes, back in the 90s, it only cost me $8/month!

I know of a non-profit debt consolidation company, DebtWave Credit Counseling in San Diego, and they too charge $50/month--inflation? Well, I wouldn't be not so happy paying that much, either. $50 could go towards bringing down my debt!

But, the beauty of these companies is they negotiate a lower payment for you. That $20k CC debt could end up being $10k. For me, Genus contacted Discover and got them to agree to get rid of all overdraft fees, late payment charges, every fee imaginable! Discover even let me pay my thousands $$ of debt off without interest. No interest! I'm a loyal Discovercard member ever since.

Genus negotiated this with some other CC I had with smaller balances. The other CC weren't as generous, but still, I couldn't have paid it off with the interest and fees they charged!

You should talk to a debt counselor and see what your monthly payment would be after they negotiate with your creditors. There's no risk. You won't have to sign up unless you like the figures.

If after paying the $50 fee, you won't have much left towards your debt, then maybe you can cut back in other ways. When I was paying off my bills, I didn't go to the movies, no Starbucks, no entertainment, no shopping for clothes or Christmas gifts. Serious, no Xmas gifts for 2 years. My family didn't mind.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-03-2016, 08:15 PM
 
13,915 posts, read 7,411,228 times
Reputation: 25410
Quote:
Originally Posted by ACWhite View Post
Not true. There is a huge body of research on the effects of raising the minimum wage, and it does not show that the net effects are negative. Some of the research shows an unemployment effect; some does not. And many other consequences are measured in some studies. Check it out; as a retiree you have time to research it online or go to your library. If you're unwilling to do that, you won't have any credibility. But at least check out the unemployment rates in cities and states that have minimum wages above the federal standard. You'll see they tend to be LOWER, not higher.
It depends on how much you raise it. Inflation-adjusted, the minimum wage was $10.25 in 1968. The world didn't end. If you push it to $25.00/hour, it would drive businesses to invest in automation rather than pay the high labor costs. You would make 30% of the population unemployable. There is a middle ground. In a high cost area, it might be $15.00/hour. In a low cost area, it might be more like that $10.25.

I employ lots of people. I don't pay anybody less than $20.00 per hour. Anybody who isn't worth that isn't worth my time supervising and micromanaging them.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-04-2016, 07:49 AM
 
633 posts, read 462,961 times
Reputation: 1103
Quote:
Originally Posted by matisse12 View Post
Burger Fan,

Low level government jobs exist. That is what I was saying. I never said they are the only category of public sector jobs.

Your screed does not dispute that. In fact, it confirms it. 11,000 workers in one state who are in the office and clerical category is not a small number of workers.

Nor are you being accused of not being a valued person.

You Implied that there was a significant percentage of government jobs that were "low level paper pushers."

The data provided proves that false, period. 84% of the state's 70,000 man workforce (from a state with 13 million residents) is not "pushing paper" of any type as a primary occupation. Compare that percentage to the private sector and you'll find it compares quite favorably to ANY large organization. Feel free to find a company with 70-100K workers that has less than 5% clerical and office support- they don't exist.


And again you assume that all 11,000 clerical are somehow low skill workers- they aren't. There are many positions that fall into clerical, and if you think they're redundant or low skill, good luck getting paid or filing a disability claim without them.

Do low level jobs exist? absolutely. they exist in the public and private sector because at the end of the day SOMEONE has to do the drudge work. I can't pay a PHD to transcribe meeting minutes, it's a waste of money. But you continue to push a narrative that this is ALL government does, when that's far from the truth.


As for my own personal worth it doesn't depend on what someone on a forum does or does not think. I've been well compensated both here and in the private sector. Working for the state was out of preference, not necessity.

Last edited by Burger Fan; 02-04-2016 at 07:58 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top