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Old 02-26-2016, 10:55 AM
 
Location: Paranoid State
13,047 posts, read 10,448,897 times
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I semi-retired in my mid-40s and fully retired before 50. However, I really think there is no such thing as retirement. You just change what you do every day.
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Old 02-26-2016, 11:10 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,747,361 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SportyandMisty View Post
I semi-retired in my mid-40s and fully retired before 50. However, I really think there is no such thing as retirement. You just change what you do every day.
For most people the nature of the change is huge, not trivial. In retirement, we are deciding on the time frames for almost everything we do, and we are deciding how much or how little we want to "do every day". When we are working, those things are decided for us by someone else. So there really is such a thing as retirement. Even semi-retirement is a very real, and very different reality from either full-time work or complete retirement.
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Old 02-26-2016, 11:21 AM
 
2,290 posts, read 1,297,797 times
Reputation: 1520
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Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
In retirement, we are deciding on the time frames for almost everything we do, and we are deciding how much or how little we want to "do every day". When we are working, those things are decided for us by someone else. .
To me, being truly retired includes being exempt from the obligatory aspect of the job.
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Old 02-28-2016, 03:02 PM
 
Location: Yavapai County
746 posts, read 483,706 times
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Originally Posted by Tim Randal Walker View Post
To me, being truly retired includes being exempt from the obligatory aspect of the job.
Absolutely! Not that we will never work, but it becomes our choice when and at what.
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Old 02-28-2016, 05:48 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,687 posts, read 49,469,539 times
Reputation: 19134
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlaskaErik View Post
One of the smartest things I did was to join the Guard after my active duty stint was up. Having that extra retirement means filet mignon instead of sirloin or a BMW instead of a Cadillac. It's amazing how many people can't be bothered with one weekend a month and 15 days once a year. Now that I'm retired I'm hearing the regrets of those who didn't stay in. Thankfully, I don't have those regrets. Congratulations.
I know two guys who did one enlistment on Active Duty, then 10+ years in the Reserves, followed by Active Duty again until they were forced to retire.

One of them left Active Duty as an E5, climbed up to E9 in the Reserves before going back onto Active Duty.
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Old 08-20-2016, 12:22 PM
 
1,412 posts, read 551,744 times
Reputation: 3124
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Originally Posted by Just Conversation View Post
At Christmas a group of relatives was talking to my brother who retired in his late 50s. He had lost his job but got a huge severance check and decided after some thought that with savings and great investments he could afford to retire from full time work.

I don't know if it was jealousy or ignorance or whatever, most of the relatives in the discussion did not think it was right that someone would retire in their fifties. One older guy in his 70s, told him, "In my day, you were expected to work until age 65, then you can retire." Another person said, "But your still young, why would you want to just sit around the house all day at your age?"

What do you think about people who retire in their 50s?
They are very lucky people and they should go for it if they get a chance. Life if too short! What's the point in working so long if you don't have to??!!There is much other things one can do besides sitting around the house BUT if he wants to do that...then so be it because I bet when he was working all those years...he barely got to enjoy his house anyways!lol
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Old 08-20-2016, 01:18 PM
 
131 posts, read 80,283 times
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I was "laid off" at 52 and decided not to go back to work.

My husband was 61 and had heart problems. We didn't want to take painting classes or yoga or learn a new language. We walked our dogs and talked and laughed and sang and danced. We spent time with family and took little road trips to visit relatives or places we thought we might enjoy and we did. Now I'm 60 and he's gone and my family tells me to go back to work to get my mind off what I lost. I don't want to get my mind off of it. I want to remember the good times and hope for more. Work isn't the answer for me. The answer is friends and family that want to spend time with me. I want to talk and laugh and dance and sing.
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Old 08-20-2016, 02:16 PM
 
29,784 posts, read 34,880,403 times
Reputation: 11710
Quote:
Originally Posted by Just Conversation View Post
At Christmas a group of relatives was talking to my brother who retired in his late 50s. He had lost his job but got a huge severance check and decided after some thought that with savings and great investments he could afford to retire from full time work.

I don't know if it was jealousy or ignorance or whatever, most of the relatives in the discussion did not think it was right that someone would retire in their fifties. One older guy in his 70s, told him, "In my day, you were expected to work until age 65, then you can retire." Another person said, "But your still young, why would you want to just sit around the house all day at your age?"

What do you think about people who retire in their 50s?
Congrats to them. We retired in our late fifties and said to ourselves well done, so the same to them.
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Old 08-21-2016, 05:33 AM
 
4,346 posts, read 6,061,197 times
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We both retired in our fifties and it worked for us just fine! Nobody else's business!! Once out from behind our desks, we lost weight, exercised more and ate better. Wouldn't have done it any differently.
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