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Old 02-10-2016, 11:03 AM
 
6,306 posts, read 5,051,434 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
True, and your case is fairly exceptional, especially dealing with the spouse with cancer while mom is old and ill. Obviously in cases like this, you can't just go out do things the way someone without commitment does.
I'm glad I got a lot of traveling and excitement out of the way in my younger life. A lot of it thanks to my Air Force career. We traveled to lots of interesting places - even up to the Arctic Circle - middle of nowhere and the jungles of Panama. And Europe and the Middle East.

I remember when we used to drive around the country to our projects and I would see seniors driving in packs in their RVs - they scared me. Looked dangerous - they were always swerving all over the place, so I knew that was nothing I ever wanted to do!

I should not say I never go anywhere. Just got home from going out to eat and later on tonight going to the city to a special dinner event.

My outings are now limited to maybe overnight at the most. I have a lot of pets and don't want to leave my other half in charge in his condition. He is doing much better now. I do leave the big rambunctious pup at the kennel if I am gone overnight. The other dogs are pretty passive.

Life goes on.
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Old 02-10-2016, 11:39 AM
 
Location: Deep In The Heart of Texas
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I think it's wonderful, if you can afford to do it. And who says they will sit around all day. 1/2 day should be okay! LOL
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Old 02-10-2016, 11:47 AM
 
466 posts, read 348,247 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Just Conversation View Post
At Christmas a group of relatives was talking to my brother who retired in his late 50s. He had lost his job but got a huge severance check and decided after some thought that with savings and great investments he could afford to retire from full time work.

I don't know if it was jealousy or ignorance or whatever, most of the relatives in the discussion did not think it was right that someone would retire in their fifties. One older guy in his 70s, told him, "In my day, you were expected to work until age 65, then you can retire." Another person said, "But your still young, why would you want to just sit around the house all day at your age?"

What do you think about people who retire in their 50s?
If someone has "played the game right" and can afford to retire in their 50's with the kind of lifestyle that they want, more power to them.

It's the people that know they will need to work their entire lives that are bitter and jealous about something like that.

I'm almost 50, I'm sure I could probably retire by my late 50's if things keep going the way they have, but I honestly don't know if I'll want to then. I have a fairly laid back job that pays well, and I don't have much stress in my life. I also enjoy the perks that come with my job, the travel, the golf tournaments, etc.
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Old 02-10-2016, 11:58 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
5,628 posts, read 4,221,968 times
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My mom and dad both retired in their late 50s (~15 years ago). They both still work part time jobs just for fun money but they never regretted retiring early. They don't travel a ton. They might take 1 or 2 week long vacations a year but mostly they stay busy at home. My dad does a heck of a lot more now than he ever did while he was grinding out 10+ plus hour days in the corporate world. Every time i go back home to visit, my dad has added something or built something or done something around the house that simply never got done when he was working full time. It makes sense to me now but initially i was surprised at all the things he was doing in his spare time!

I plan/hope to retire when i turn 60 (~10 years from now). Just a few years after the age of which my dad retired. I hope my mom and dad are still active by then... wish i could retire today just so i could be with them more now.
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Old 02-10-2016, 12:12 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles
3,538 posts, read 2,232,428 times
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I think that everyone should do what they want. As for me, I'm 63 1/2 and have no plans to retire, though I was able to retire years ago. I simply love my work. I'm an independent real estate appraiser and it is the "funnest" job you can imagine. I go all over the city appraising everything from condos to movie star mansions. No two days are alike. I have slowed it down over the past couple years, so now I just take the jobs I want. If I want to take off for a week, I just don't book anything for that week, I'm in control of my time. I think I have the best of both worlds, so why fix it if it isn't broken?
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Old 02-10-2016, 12:25 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
5,628 posts, read 4,221,968 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JustMike77 View Post
I think that everyone should do what they want. As for me, I'm 63 1/2 and have no plans to retire, though I was able to retire years ago. I simply love my work. I'm an independent real estate appraiser and it is the "funnest" job you can imagine. I go all over the city appraising everything from condos to movie star mansions. No two days are alike. I have slowed it down over the past couple years, so now I just take the jobs I want. If I want to take off for a week, I just don't book anything for that week, I'm in control of my time. I think I have the best of both worlds, so why fix it if it isn't broken?


My wife is in the same boat (flight attendant) and she has already told me she has no plans to retire when I do. Couple that with the fact that she is 7 years younger than me, I might be dead and gone by the time she retires!
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Old 02-10-2016, 12:32 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
34,682 posts, read 33,681,492 times
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It's telling that they must sit around all day in retirement to assume he'd do the same.
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Old 02-10-2016, 12:38 PM
 
Location: Florida
4,103 posts, read 4,273,738 times
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People seem to forget that most of our "customs" have only been around the past 100 years or so out of the millions of years that passed beforehand. I love when people act like things like this are some sort of long standing moral code. You used to work till you died, heck go back long enough and you worked till something ate you.

Sounds like pure jealousy to me.
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Old 02-10-2016, 01:49 PM
 
5,426 posts, read 3,446,805 times
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thinkalot, I don't think that retiring at age 65 was something which occurred just mostly "over 50 years ago" and not in the 70's, 80's, and 90's.

Perhaps that is your experience and you are extrapolating to the larger United States?

Retiring in one's 60's has been very common. Those fewer in numbers in the military, those who accepted buyouts, those laid off, some teachers, some in government jobs, some in physical labor etc and those with enough money have still retired in their 50's.

One man I know who stopped working at age 50 and who is now 62 has hit problems of loss of purpose, not having fulfilling things to do, loss of meaningful activities, listlessness, some boredom, over-spending, depression. I think he stopped working way too soon for his particular personality and his emotional needs.

Last edited by matisse12; 02-10-2016 at 02:03 PM..
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Old 02-10-2016, 01:56 PM
 
6,306 posts, read 5,051,434 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by matisse12 View Post
thinkalot, I don't think that retiring at age 65 was something which occurred just mostly 50 years and not in the 70's, 80's, and 90's.

Perhaps that is your experience and you are extrapolating to the larger United States?

Retiring in one's 60's has been a course many have followed. Those fewer in numbers in the military, those who accepted buyouts, those laid off, some teachers, some in government jobs, some in physical labor etc and those with enough money have still retired in their 50's.

One man I know who stopped working at age 50 and who is now 62 has hit problems of loss of purpose, not having fulfilling things to do, loss of meaningful activities, listlessness, some boredom, over-spending, depression. I think he stopped working way too soon for his particular personality and his emotional needs.
He should get himself a little part time job.

I was getting restless with this cold weather. I stopped by a Dollar Store yesterday and saw this old guy stocking shelves. The young manager told him they were getting him some help. And he was thankful. I thought, boy, I should jump in and get a job and help him out. Then I came to my senses! But you never know.

Looking forward to spring and summer when I can spend all day outside - even in 100 degree weather. I've ordered more raised beds and get going on my garden barter group.
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