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Old 02-11-2016, 06:24 AM
 
Location: Florida
4,103 posts, read 4,280,254 times
Reputation: 10056

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vision67 View Post
I finally retired 3 months ago when I hit age 66. I actually would have preferred to continue working because I actually loved my job but...

I suddenly noticed that too many of my friends and acquaintances my age were starting to die off

My employer offered a 6 month salary bonus and I had saved enough.

I decided that dying on the job would be awfully embarrassing.

"To everything there is a season.."
At my first job there were a lot of welders/solderers on the plant floor that had worked there 30+ years. Every once in a while people would die just before retirement. And in a few sad circumstances some would die a few days after retirement. It was truly sad to hear about.
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Old 02-11-2016, 06:34 AM
 
130 posts, read 92,846 times
Reputation: 154
The man said who said, "in my day" you retire at age 65, is speaking some truth even today. Most people will retire when they can get Medicare and Social Security. If you can retire before then you are considered lucky or lazy.
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Old 02-11-2016, 07:16 AM
 
Location: Fuquay Varina
4,578 posts, read 6,656,958 times
Reputation: 11350
Quote:
Originally Posted by Just Conversation View Post
The man said who said, "in my day" you retire at age 65, is speaking some truth even today. Most people will retire when they can get Medicare and Social Security. If you can retire before then you are considered lucky or lazy.


If someone has managed to be able to retire early why would any normal person think they are lazy?
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Old 02-11-2016, 07:21 AM
 
130 posts, read 92,846 times
Reputation: 154
Quote:
Originally Posted by SVTLightning View Post
If someone has managed to be able to retire early why would any normal person think they are lazy?
Because the American work ethic culture says you should keep working until your health does not allow it.
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Old 02-11-2016, 07:33 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,614 posts, read 17,598,460 times
Reputation: 27693
Quote:
Originally Posted by Just Conversation View Post
Because the American work ethic culture says you should keep working until your health does not allow it.
These days, I think it's just the opposite. The onus seems to be on retiring as soon as you can.
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Old 02-11-2016, 08:17 AM
 
Location: NE Mississippi
13,689 posts, read 8,594,306 times
Reputation: 19922
Quote:
Originally Posted by Just Conversation View Post
At Christmas a group of relatives was talking to my brother who retired in his late 50s. He had lost his job but got a huge severance check and decided after some thought that with savings and great investments he could afford to retire from full time work.

I don't know if it was jealousy or ignorance or whatever, most of the relatives in the discussion did not think it was right that someone would retire in their fifties. One older guy in his 70s, told him, "In my day, you were expected to work until age 65, then you can retire." Another person said, "But your still young, why would you want to just sit around the house all day at your age?"

What do you think about people who retire in their 50s?
I've seen that mistake. I worked closely with many people who were offered early severance from BellSouth.
That was in the early 90's, and every one of them is out of money. The problem with the early severance was that they gave up their retirement - it was a lump sum payout. And every one of them thought it was a wonderful opportunity.

Nothing wrong with not working if you don't have to, but usually you shoot yourself in the foot by doing so.

I know of 2 cases where relatively young people bought sailboats and retired to sail forever. Now they are 70 and because they have been gone so long and have no real assets there is no way to come back. Can you imagine coming back to America at age 70 with no Social Security to speak of, no savings, and no recent work history?

"More better" you should find something profitable to do with your time.
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Old 02-11-2016, 08:26 AM
 
6,323 posts, read 5,067,075 times
Reputation: 12848
Quote:
Originally Posted by TwinbrookNine View Post
I retired at 55. Saved my money meticulously for 25 years, and was ready to retire - so I did. Healthy as a horse until age 62 (then, stroke followed by a heart attack, and sciatica that has me almost totally debilitated). Let's face it, I'm circling the drain at 64. We're talking "Mr Cholesterol around 150 and HDL of 65, for 30 years." Moral? Assume nothing.


BTW, in the past 3 yrs, 2 relatives and three friends of mine all died between 59 and 64.


If you want to work til you drop, fine. But, not me. Thank goodness for those 7 - 8 years of useful, fun retirement. I'm glad I retired when I did.
I'm 55 and I think half of my high school classmates are dead. It was a small class, but still! Three died last year.
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Old 02-11-2016, 08:59 AM
 
Location: San Ramon, Seattle, Anchorage, Reykjavik
2,241 posts, read 991,166 times
Reputation: 3115
Quote:
Originally Posted by Listener2307 View Post
I've seen that mistake. I worked closely with many people who were offered early severance from BellSouth.
That was in the early 90's, and every one of them is out of money. The problem with the early severance was that they gave up their retirement - it was a lump sum payout. And every one of them thought it was a wonderful opportunity.

Nothing wrong with not working if you don't have to, but usually you shoot yourself in the foot by doing so.

I know of 2 cases where relatively young people bought sailboats and retired to sail forever. Now they are 70 and because they have been gone so long and have no real assets there is no way to come back. Can you imagine coming back to America at age 70 with no Social Security to speak of, no savings, and no recent work history?

"More better" you should find something profitable to do with your time.
I'm not buying it. Just because some people didn't do their planning and are in a bad way (according to someone) doesn't discount the incredible experiences they gained sailing around the world. Recent work history? What kind of job do you think the average 70 year old is going to find that requires a recent job history? Ever try changing from one professional job to another at age 70? Pretty much impossible. However, with all that experience gained on the sailboat it would easily transfer into a role with a non-profit, a church, or even starting a small business. Lots of possibilities, a little trouble, but well worth it for a life well lived.
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Old 02-11-2016, 09:55 AM
 
9,462 posts, read 5,268,978 times
Reputation: 3238
Quote:
Originally Posted by Just Conversation View Post
At Christmas a group of relatives was talking to my brother who retired in his late 50s. He had lost his job but got a huge severance check and decided after some thought that with savings and great investments he could afford to retire from full time work.

I don't know if it was jealousy or ignorance or whatever, most of the relatives in the discussion did not think it was right that someone would retire in their fifties. One older guy in his 70s, told him, "In my day, you were expected to work until age 65, then you can retire." Another person said, "But your still young, why would you want to just sit around the house all day at your age?"

What do you think about people who retire in their 50s?
My Dad retired at 58 in 1974.
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Old 02-11-2016, 09:58 AM
 
Location: SoCal
6,074 posts, read 9,538,346 times
Reputation: 5817
Quote:
Originally Posted by Just Conversation View Post
At Christmas a group of relatives was talking to my brother who retired in his late 50s. He had lost his job but got a huge severance check and decided after some thought that with savings and great investments he could afford to retire from full time work.

I don't know if it was jealousy or ignorance or whatever, most of the relatives in the discussion did not think it was right that someone would retire in their fifties. One older guy in his 70s, told him, "In my day, you were expected to work until age 65, then you can retire." Another person said, "But your still young, why would you want to just sit around the house all day at your age?"

What do you think about people who retire in their 50s?
Military and government employees often retired before 65 because they got good benefits in lieu of good paychecks. It's simply not true what that older guy said.
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