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Old 02-27-2016, 04:55 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,942,381 times
Reputation: 6716

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
I've enjoyed reading this thread because the majority of posters are conducting a rational discussion. The inevitable angry and hyperbolic bashing of the United States was predictable, as we know that poster well.

I wonder if there is any statistic about how many people with U.S. citizenship live more or less permanently abroad?
I am totally pragmatic when it comes to this stuff. I am not a celebrity who says I will leave the US if X or Y gets elected. To me - it is totally an issue of where I could I live OK. Without a lot of hassles.

My husband - Mr. Language - has always said we should perhaps live here and there outside the US. A year here - and a year there. Me - Mrs. Practical - who takes care of day to day stuff - well I look at things ranging from health care to taxes to getting HSI - and it gives me a headache. Even in English (much less a language I don't speak very well).

My husband and I have to stay here until my father dies. Because we can't move him - my brothers don't give a fig - and he is 97 and needs help. After then - who knows? I am honestly looking at southern California - even with all the taxes. Because I like the weather. At our age - we're not exactly saving our money for our old age anymore. Robyn
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Old 02-27-2016, 07:59 PM
 
Location: Miraflores
786 posts, read 895,747 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
Is anyone here who is considering or actually doing this over 70? Robyn
In my 13 years in Peru, I can only think of a handful who came here after age 70 (all fairly wealthy)and married to older Peruvian women who wanted to return home. One friend a German (lived in USA for 30 years) came here at 70, married a 30 yo and now has a 4 year old daughter, another German (BMW family money) came here in his 70's, the last one (Vegas restaurant owner in the 60's) came in his early 70's and died on my birthday when he was 84. While the majority of expats are in their 20's and 30's retires are usually 50's and 60's and this is not their first expat experience. If you can not self insure, many countries can be difficult. Here in Lima ( many international insurers) You must insure before age 65 ($2,000/yr, $0 deductible) and the premiums rise until age 70 ($3700/yr) and then are capped until you die. Insurance is so cheap because only the top 10% have it and the rest go on national HI and have to use the gov't hospitals.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
I wonder if there is any statistic about how many people with U.S. citizenship live more or less permanently abroad?
I would say it's in the 10's of millions when you add the USA expat workforce. The only number I recall seeing for retiree's was 800,000 collecting Social Security. I am one of the few I know here that are collecting.
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Old 02-28-2016, 03:59 AM
 
12,721 posts, read 14,093,600 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alpineprince View Post
....I would say it's in the 10's of millions when you add the USA expat workforce. The only number I recall seeing for retiree's was 800,000 collecting Social Security. I am one of the few I know here that are collecting.
I emigrated in Jan. 2000, and have lived in Portugal and Cyprus. I don't recall ever meeting another American who was collecting SS, but then I almost never have met other American permanent residents wherever I have lived. I haven't lived in metropolitan areas, and usually a bit distant from them, so this may be one reason.

I understand that most U.S. citizens living in Portugal are retired back in the Açores.

I know of an ex-boss who married a Belgian man, and has remained there after being widowed.
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Old 02-28-2016, 05:33 AM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,942,381 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alpineprince View Post
...Here in Lima ( many international insurers) You must insure before age 65...
Very useful information.

And it rules us out (my husband and I are both over 65). Probably a fair number of people here in the Retirement Forum too. And we wouldn't care to self-insure. Although we're in reasonably good health - both of us increasingly need a fair amount of (sometimes expensive) "routine maintenance" to keep us in good health. We were both happy when we went on Medicare. Which is an excellent deal for seniors in the US (compared to what's around for non-seniors). But it doesn't cover us outside the US. Robyn
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Old 02-28-2016, 07:22 AM
 
Location: Washington State
18,586 posts, read 9,605,999 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
Very useful information.

And it rules us out (my husband and I are both over 65). Probably a fair number of people here in the Retirement Forum too. And we wouldn't care to self-insure. Although we're in reasonably good health - both of us increasingly need a fair amount of (sometimes expensive) "routine maintenance" to keep us in good health. We were both happy when we went on Medicare. Which is an excellent deal for seniors in the US (compared to what's around for non-seniors). But it doesn't cover us outside the US. Robyn
That's why if I decide to expat again, it will be before I hit 65...afterward, doesn't make as much $ense unless they change Medicare or the pre-Medicare plans.
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Old 02-28-2016, 08:31 AM
 
Location: Miraflores
786 posts, read 895,747 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kevxu View Post
I emigrated in Jan. 2000, and have lived in Portugal and Cyprus. I don't recall ever meeting another American who was collecting SS, but then I almost never have met other American permanent residents wherever I have lived. I haven't lived in metropolitan areas, and usually a bit distant from them, so this may be one reason.

I understand that most U.S. citizens living in Portugal are retired back in the Açores.

I know of an ex-boss who married a Belgian man, and has remained there after being widowed.
Here in Peru, 1/3 of the populace live in Lima,despite being the 20th largest country in the world. In places like Ecuador and Panama many more retired expats will live outside the major city. Lima is popular due to climate (lack of weather), World class private clinics (hospitals), World class food, On the Pacific ocean, relativity cheap for an international capitol, great air service, Mid point of SA so everything is close by air and my personal favorite "No flying bugs". I know of a smattering of expats in the jungle cities (Iquitos,Tarapota,Pulcalpa) and of course the hippies who flock to Cusco and the Sacred Valley, but even Peru's second largest city Arequipa gets very few according to our expat forums.
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Old 02-28-2016, 11:32 AM
 
197 posts, read 161,095 times
Reputation: 1122
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultrarunner View Post
A couple of my high school friends have EU passports and had never been to Europe.

Their parents came from Ireland about 40 years ago and settled in the SF Bay Area.

They signed their kids up for Irish passports and they still have them.

Another friend has a Swiss passport... his Grandfather signed him up when he was born...

When it was time to go to college he opted to go in Switzerland as it was almost free...
I am a dual UK/US citizen ( born in the UK) , as are my children, but this privilege does not extend to my grandchildren.
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Old 02-28-2016, 11:49 AM
 
26,591 posts, read 52,334,622 times
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I know it doesn't apply to those in Austria... at age 18/21 the child must decide.

Ireland had or has some of the most lienit requirements... both instances predate the EU... as does the Swiss one.

I looked into the Austrian passport and was told Austria doesn't permit this... then I said how is it Arnold Schwarzenegger has both Austria and US...
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Old 02-28-2016, 12:11 PM
 
Location: Great State of Texas
86,093 posts, read 72,544,616 times
Reputation: 27566
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultrarunner View Post
A couple of my high school friends have EU passports and had never been to Europe.

Their parents came from Ireland about 40 years ago and settled in the SF Bay Area.

They signed their kids up for Irish passports and they still have them.

Another friend has a Swiss passport... his Grandfather signed him up when he was born...

When it was time to go to college he opted to go in Switzerland as it was almost free...
You are a dual citizen by birth for Irish law. My father was born in Ireland so I am a dual citizen by birth.
My brother just finished the process of getting his Irish passport. Took about 10 months total including gathering all the documents needed.

And Irish citizenship can be passed down even if you never set foot in the country and are not dual citizen by birthright. Just have to register your kids in some book in Ireland (about $500).

But once the line is broke (someone doesn't register) then dual citizenship is lost forever.
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Old 02-28-2016, 12:46 PM
 
26,591 posts, read 52,334,622 times
Reputation: 20438
I think it is similar for my Swiss friend...

The brother's from Ireland had never set foot outside the US... their Grandfather had registered them... all I know is that the Grandfather did something.

It is interesting how one EU country can be so strict and another the opposite.
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