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Old 02-28-2016, 01:54 PM
 
Location: Great State of Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultrarunner View Post
I think it is similar for my Swiss friend...

The brother's from Ireland had never set foot outside the US... their Grandfather had registered them... all I know is that the Grandfather did something.

It is interesting how one EU country can be so strict and another the opposite.
All these birthright laws were enacted long before the EU was even an idea.

Some countries let you go back 2 generations. Ireland is one of them. Parents or Grandparents born in Ireland qualifies you.

My cousin used my grandfather to get her Irish passport. She lives in Portugal.
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Old 02-28-2016, 02:20 PM
 
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The friend with the now EU passport finds himself going to Europe for business... said having the EU passport has come in handy a few times...

My Grandmother is Austrian and that is why I looked into it... unfortunately no luck... they don't even count if your mother is Austrian at that time... only if your Father is Austrian.

Having an EU passport also makes it easier to own property as an American in the EU or retire to another EU country...
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Old 02-28-2016, 03:24 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
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My grandparents were born in Russia and what I believe is now part of Poland (Galicia). Think "Fidddler On The Roof" . Even if I could go back - don't think I would .

As for my husband - his family came from the UK like about 200-300 years ago. Don't think you get free dual citizenship for that . Robyn
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Old 02-28-2016, 03:32 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HappyTexan View Post
You are a dual citizen by birth for Irish law. My father was born in Ireland so I am a dual citizen by birth.
My brother just finished the process of getting his Irish passport. Took about 10 months total including gathering all the documents needed.

And Irish citizenship can be passed down even if you never set foot in the country and are not dual citizen by birthright. Just have to register your kids in some book in Ireland (about $500).

But once the line is broke (someone doesn't register) then dual citizenship is lost forever.
But there are - or used to be - some favorable laws when it came to moving to Ireland as well. Like my father's girlfriend's brother - who is Jewish and most certainly had no relatives in Ireland - moved there maybe 30-40 years ago - when he was perhaps 40-50 - to escape a financially onerous court order when he divorced his wife. He never stepped foot in the US again - not even to visit family. Perhaps he got a work permit - so he could live there (he's a psychiatrist)? Robyn
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Old 02-28-2016, 03:50 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kevxu View Post
I think that Spain and Portugal, and a couple of other countries with large Brit ex-pat populations, will work very hard to see that a Brexit will not be the cause for their departure. And I fully expect that in this they will be supported by other EU members. However, these countries will also be looking for continued considerations for their citizens who reside in the U.K.

I expect there will be a Brexit, and would be quite surprised if it did not pass.

However, I am strongly inclined to think that this issue of ex-pats will not become a "pawn" issue. Lots and lots of sticky, nitty-gritty details, of course, but nothing like that of British financial services. This first link will give you a very "lite" version of one possibility, but go down to the bottom to "Alternatives" and see where the biggest landmine is buried.

The Norway option: what is it and what does it mean for Britain? | Politics | The Guardian

The Norway option: what is it and what does it mean for Britain? | Politics | The Guardian

EU exit: 'Norway option' would leave UK with 94% of current costs

Given the number of deals possible and their huge impact on the UK and the EU, it makes me more than ever believe that making life as uncomplicated for each others ex-pats will seem highly desirable in many respects.
I am too far away from the situation to have a firm opinion re Brexit (last time I was in the UK was almost a year ago) - but I tend to think the possibility is better than 50/50 now.

The most important issue for retired ex-pats from the UK will be the health insurance thing - which none of your links seems to address (perhaps quite rightfully - it is certainly not anywhere in the top 10 issues when it comes to the Brexit issue).

I only have one good friend in the UK (in London) and - although he travels a lot - he has no desire to become an ex-pat when he retires (he and his wife are younger than we are - late 50's).

There is something to be said for staying put in one's home country - whatever it is - especially when you're old/retired. Because whatever rules you have to follow are less likely to change for you (although they might change for younger people). So you can plan accordingly. Robyn
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Old 02-28-2016, 04:43 PM
 
Location: land of ahhhs
277 posts, read 298,268 times
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My all time favorite thread on this forum has to be the now defunct "women retiring alone" one, but this, so far, rates a close second. Would that it runs as long! Very informative over a vast array of topics, and so much effort spent with the various links and lengthy posts. Brexit, taxes, motives, insurance, locations...all good.

I'm going to South Africa in April, and while researching my trip happened upon a few US citizens/residents planning to retire there. And I think I've mentioned in the past meeting a former diplomat who snowbirds between Cape Town and Cape Cod with her two Boerboels! It would be just my luck to find "my best spot" half way round the world. Anyone with experience in SA? (No plans to leave forever, but an adventure living abroad is something I've considered for years.)
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Old 02-29-2016, 05:19 AM
 
12,687 posts, read 14,071,402 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
....The most important issue for retired ex-pats from the UK will be the health insurance thing - which none of your links seems to address (perhaps quite rightfully - it is certainly not anywhere in the top 10 issues when it comes to the Brexit issue)....
Apropos the above....

I am living in Portugal now, and in an area with many Brit ex-pats. The majority, from what I see and hear, go to our local private hospital for relatively minor stuff or "maintenance" of existing health situations.

Brit pensioners can get free healthcare from hospitals in the Portuguese state system through a registration process. However, this does not cover the private hospitals from anything that I have read. The British clients I see in the private hospitals that I have used pay by cash, cheque or direct debit and get a receipt that same as I do. I presume (but do not know for a fact) that they then present this bill to a private health insurance carrier or eat it as I read that the British NHS does not pay for foreign medical care.

I find the care is fine and the costs are so much lower than the U.S. that I often simply pay out-of-pocket, do not submit them to my insurance and deduct them from the local tax allowance....and I am not rolling in euros. I use an English insurance company, by the way.

At the first indication from a local health practitioner that their health problem is more than routine, a great many Brits hop plane back home to the UK to followup there. I know enough older Brits (and one in the medical profession) to see that this is not an unusual option, and flights are cheap and quick.

What I could see changing in this, if there is a Brexit, is that Brit pensioners might no longer be able to "exchange" their enrollment in their own NHS for care in the Portuguese state system. As for using private insurance, I presume there would be no change. So, essentially they would be in my position. If they had selected a private policy, as one from Exeter Friendly, which has rates based upon age of entry, and did not decide to change insurers - the cost of private health care would not be huge. Based on personal experience Exeter reimburses at an extremely high rate for medical charges here.

Thus, I would think those Brit ex-pats who would find themselves up a pole would be those who have opted to rely entirely on the state system when they retired here. If they cannot afford to buy private coverage after a Brexit, they would have to go bye-bye...unless - the great unless again - the UK and the former EU countries did a deal covering those already using each other's state systems before some date chosen in relation to any Brexit.

Last edited by kevxu; 02-29-2016 at 06:13 AM..
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Old 02-29-2016, 06:21 AM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,925,663 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kevxu View Post
...At the first indication from a local health practitioner that their health problem is more than routine, a great many Brits hop plane back home to the UK to followup there. I know enough older Brits (and one in the medical profession) to see that this is not an unusual option, and flights are cheap and quick...
It's easy to forget how relatively small and compact most of Europe is. Even a somewhat non-central place like Lisbon is a 2 1/2 hour flight from London - about the same as Miami to New York. When we were in Stockholm a few years ago - the place was crowded over the weekend with travelers from elsewhere in Europe who just spending a couple of days. But - when we're talking about places outside Europe - in Asia - or South America - or South Africa as was mentioned recently - it's easy to get into much longer distances/flight times. And the flights can cost (a lot) more too.

FWIW - I recall a time when the Canadian health care system would pay for routine health care in the US. So (older) Canadians could easily snowbird in Florida during the winter without having to worry about health care. Canada has apparently cut way back on that type of thing in the last decade or so (probably to save money). And - of course - our Medicare has never paid for that kind of thing to the best of my knowledge.

One thing no one has mentioned is that retired US military seem to have health care options outside the US that aren't available to non-military:

http://www.military.com/benefits/tri...-overseas.html

Robyn

Last edited by Robyn55; 02-29-2016 at 06:30 AM..
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Old 02-29-2016, 07:03 AM
 
Location: Wasilla, AK
7,240 posts, read 4,132,331 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
One thing no one has mentioned is that retired US military seem to have health care options outside the US that aren't available to non-military:

TRICARE Overseas | Military.com

Robyn

I didn't even know that, and I qualify. I am also eligible for dual citizenship, as I was born right after my parents emigrated to the US from Europe. My sister went that route, but I personally have no interest in living in Europe. But, I at least have the option.
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Old 02-29-2016, 07:57 AM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,925,663 times
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The military stuff is - based on some things I've read over the years - a fairly complicated issue. With rules that are in a state of flux. It's not only a question of coverage - but what facilities you can use and where they're located. Also - some countries - like the Philippines - have their own specific rules. You can't simply flash your Tricare card and get care anywhere outside the US (just like you can't get care everywhere in the US either). IIRC - we ran across some retired military in Germany - and they got their health care at a local army base near where they lived. I also recall a thread dealing with the issue (some retired military were upset about the quality of care abroad). Here it is:

U.S. Government's plan to change TRICARE Overseas

Robyn
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