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Old 02-29-2016, 09:01 AM
 
12,703 posts, read 14,081,338 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
It's easy to forget how relatively small and compact most of Europe is. Even a somewhat non-central place like Lisbon is a 2 1/2 hour flight from London - about the same as Miami to New York. ....
Re: going back to UK for health care.

Yes, and many Brits are settled around Cascais just north of Lisbon.

However, many live on on the south coast/Algarve, and the district airport has flights to the UK as well. I would imagine that some of the cities in southern Spain, where there are many Brit retirees on the coast, probably also have direct flights from their airports too. I fly to Ireland direct from the same airport...and I presume this luxury of direct travel is the result of the number of Irish who now have a second home down here or retire here.

I have a British friend and his wife who are finally locating here as their permanent residence in about three weeks as his wife has retired. I shall have to ask him more about how Brits work things, he has his own clinic here and works in a clinic in the UK when he is there, so he should be pretty on top of the latest info.
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Old 03-01-2016, 08:12 AM
 
Location: La Isla Encanta, Puerto Rico
1,148 posts, read 3,033,795 times
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Default Less travel SA areas for retirement

Quote:
Originally Posted by mastequila View Post
My all time favorite thread on this forum has to be the now defunct "women retiring alone" one, but this, so far, rates a close second. Would that it runs as long! Very informative over a vast array of topics, and so much effort spent with the various links and lengthy posts. Brexit, taxes, motives, insurance, locations...all good.

I'm going to South Africa in April, and while researching my trip happened upon a few US citizens/residents planning to retire there. And I think I've mentioned in the past meeting a former diplomat who snowbirds between Cape Town and Cape Cod with her two Boerboels! It would be just my luck to find "my best spot" half way round the world. Anyone with experience in SA? (No plans to leave forever, but an adventure living abroad is something I've considered for years.)


I spent two weeks on vacation with one week in Durbin and one week in small villages in the foothills of the Drakensburg Mountains. Both areas would be wonderful retirement areas if not so far from family in the USA. Both very cheap compared to CapeTown and even comparable US cities.


1) Durbin - wonderful beach town on a bay that reminded me of San Francisco. Perfect weather. Perfect size - think of SF maybe 50 years ago with 20% or less of metro population yet still with vibrant club scene, fine restaurants, old book stores that gave great insight into the fascinating history of South Africa - warts and all.


2) Drakensburg foothills - Never even heard of these before scoring a Time Share trade. What a fabulous "off-the-beaten-track" place. Think Grand Tetons plucked down in a colorful tribal place - Zululand - with nearby wildlife refuges (Big 5 or a few less), wonderful hiking on green velvet clad foothills (a bit more rain than Wyoming I'm sure from the verdant countryside), cool little outdoor markets with very friendly Zulu People - my wife got the best African braid-sculpture job in her life for about 20 USD! Stayed in a really cool Zulu grass-thatch-roofed igloo looking thing that looked like pure-tribal but had electricity and plumbing. A really fantastic place that I'm sure is unique in this world.
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Old 04-28-2016, 10:50 AM
 
Location: Macao
15,945 posts, read 36,175,100 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by N.Cal View Post
Not cheap, but I'd move to Paris in a heartbeat. Lisbon is pretty great too. Or New Zealand. Or Florianopolis Brasil.
wow, usually when I read a thread like this, people state the very very mainstream choices - panama, thailand, mexico, etc.

It is very rare when I see a poster pick out some of the real interesting places out there! Florianapolis or Lisbon would be very high on my list as well. But I doubt if I'll see many other posts in this very long thread that would state that as well.
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Old 04-28-2016, 10:54 AM
 
Location: Macao
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Quote:
Originally Posted by golfingduo View Post
We are considering residency in South Korea since DW is from there. She is currently a US citizen but when she reaches the age of 65 she will be allowed to have dual citizenship and even be able to get heath care there as a Korean citizen does. I would have my BCBS to cover me but she could use national coverage. So this is on our radar for all the possibilities it presents. My retirement is full of interesting possibilities.

40 days and counting.
I lived in Korea for 8 years, there aren't many rights for foreign spouses.

That being said, healthcare was quite cheap, 'at cost' compared to the U.S. So, even without Korean-sponsored healthcare, itll be a fraction of the very corrupt U.S. heathcare system.
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Old 04-28-2016, 11:30 AM
 
Location: Washington State
18,548 posts, read 9,586,076 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
I lived in Korea for 8 years, there aren't many rights for foreign spouses.

That being said, healthcare was quite cheap, 'at cost' compared to the U.S. So, even without Korean-sponsored healthcare, itll be a fraction of the very corrupt U.S. heathcare system.
I worked in Gangnam Gu and even at posh offices, the costs were very low....I couldn't figure out how it could be so cheap....guess I was still in price shock of the US medical prices.
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Old 04-28-2016, 11:41 AM
 
Location: Macao
15,945 posts, read 36,175,100 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tall Traveler View Post
I worked in Gangnam Gu and even at posh offices, the costs were very low....I couldn't figure out how it could be so cheap....guess I was still in price shock of the US medical prices.
Yep, same in Japan! I relocated there after South Korea.

My wife gave birth in Japan, and we had her stay in the private clinic, round-the-clock for five days, with the baby. The experience set me back almost NOTHING...I think I posted it somewhere in city-data years ago, but if I remember right, it was something like US$1,000 for the private clinic to be there for the birth, and give them round the care clock for 5 days. I can't recall the price exactly now, but it didn't phase me at all financially. Unlike just giving birth alone and having your wife/kid leave immediately afterwards would have, if I were in the U.S. without insurance, or even with insurance possibly.

ANother time, we had an ultrasound done for one of my kids, since it wasn't a private clinic, I paid using the Japanese insurance system, they charged me something like US$10. If I didn't have insurance, that ultrasound was around US$500-1000, something like that, I cant recall exactly now. But the U.S., would have charged 10x that easily.

In short, the U.S. is just shockingly expensive and corrupt. It is still a shock to me, many years later, whenever I compare U.S. prices to what I get in even expensive foreign countries, comparatively.
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Old 04-28-2016, 02:38 PM
 
Location: land of ahhhs
277 posts, read 298,363 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
Yep, same in Japan! I relocated there after South Korea.

My wife gave birth in Japan, and we had her stay in the private clinic, round-the-clock for five days, with the baby. The experience set me back almost NOTHING...I think I posted it somewhere in city-data years ago, but if I remember right, it was something like US$1,000 for the private clinic to be there for the birth, and give them round the care clock for 5 days. I can't recall the price exactly now, but it didn't phase me at all financially. Unlike just giving birth alone and having your wife/kid leave immediately afterwards would have, if I were in the U.S. without insurance, or even with insurance possibly.

ANother time, we had an ultrasound done for one of my kids, since it wasn't a private clinic, I paid using the Japanese insurance system, they charged me something like US$10. If I didn't have insurance, that ultrasound was around US$500-1000, something like that, I cant recall exactly now. But the U.S., would have charged 10x that easily.

In short, the U.S. is just shockingly expensive and corrupt. It is still a shock to me, many years later, whenever I compare U.S. prices to what I get in even expensive foreign countries, comparatively.
Health care in U.S. is unarguably expensive, but corrupt? What do you mean by that? Criminals skimming money that should be going to hospitals, doctors, pharmacies? Or what? How long ago was your child born in Japan for $1000? I think my kids cost around that, but 34 and 38 years ago. Five days in hospital? Complications? C-section? Good way to get a DVT

I have heard many say they go to a private hospital overseas and it is not so outrageously expensive as in the US. But what if you went in and needed, say, a bypass and you couldn't pay for it. Would you get it? Can you walk into the ED in Japan at 0300 with vomiting and diarrhea, no insurance, no money and still get a bag of saline and some meds (even though clearly you'd survive without treatment, albeit with a few days more misery)? A friend from Scotland brought her mother to the States and paid for her hip replacement as she was very painful, couldn't get around, but was on the list--where she had been for years.

And why won't medicare cover medical expenses in foreign lands? If it's better and cheaper they'd be saving a lot of money. I have heard, but can't personally confirm, that some insurance companies will pay for medical tourism procedures. Not totally elective, like a face lift, but maybe not totally necessary, like a hip replacement.
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Old 04-28-2016, 04:45 PM
 
197 posts, read 160,967 times
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The UK National Health Service (NHS) has a rationing system admittedly, but there is no way that someone would be in pain for years and not be treated. I think that 18 months is the absolute limit.

My experiences with the NHS have been nothing but positive although there are regional differences. Brits love their NHS and only they can criticize it! It is egalitarian and free at use.
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Old 04-29-2016, 07:36 AM
 
7,801 posts, read 4,391,333 times
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We OVERTREAT in this country; it's absolutely ridiculous how everyone's running to the doctor's every five minutes for every little thing. We could save billions by just cutting out the nonsense and telling people to suck it up. Viruses resolve by themselves, antibiotics don't help, antivirals are unnecessary, and you're just spreading the germs around by running first to the doctor and then to the pharmacy and then thinking you're cured because you've popped a pill and running around some more. Go to bed; it'll take about a week. And don't even get me started on "preventative health" and chiropractors (who aren't real doctors practicing what isn't a real science). If you want a massage, go to a spa and pay for it yourself. The waste in this country's medical system is mind-boggling. Oh, and you don't need SSRIs because you're appropriately sad about something. Don't even get me started on that, either...
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Old 04-29-2016, 01:53 PM
 
1,373 posts, read 782,169 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by otterhere View Post
We OVERTREAT in this country; it's absolutely ridiculous how everyone's running to the doctor's every five minutes for every little thing. We could save billions by just cutting out the nonsense and telling people to suck it up. Viruses resolve by themselves, antibiotics don't help, antivirals are unnecessary, and you're just spreading the germs around by running first to the doctor and then to the pharmacy and then thinking you're cured because you've popped a pill and running around some more. Go to bed; it'll take about a week. And don't even get me started on "preventative health" and chiropractors (who aren't real doctors practicing what isn't a real science). If you want a massage, go to a spa and pay for it yourself. The waste in this country's medical system is mind-boggling. Oh, and you don't need SSRIs because you're appropriately sad about something. Don't even get me started on that, either...

Not sure about this "overtreating". According to this survey, people in other countries goes more often to the doctor.

U.S. Health Care from a Global Perspective - The Commonwealth Fund

Annual physician visits per capita:

Sweden: 2.9
U.S.: 4.0
France: 6.4
Germany: 9.9
Japan: 12.9

Elderly people in Germany often go to the doctor, just to have some sort of activity

Hospital discharges per 1,000 population:

Canada: 83
U.S.: 126
France: 166
Germany: 252

Hospitals in Germany are profit-oriented. They try to get as many patients as possible. The number of unnecessary surgeries is skyrocketing. At the same time the hospitals try to cut costs with the result that the personnel is overtasked.


According to this survey, the main reasons for the high health care costs in the U.S. are extremely expensive hospital and physician services. A bypass surgery in the U.S. cost more than double what it cost in Switzerland, and Switzerland is very well known for extremely high living costs and high salaries. A bypass surgery in the Netherlands cost just one fifth of the one in the U.S.
An other reason, the U.S. is very well equipped with expensive diagnostic devices. About 5 times more devices per capita than the UK for example.
And the health care industry in the U.S. seems to be overstaffed. In most counties the hospitals are the largest employer.
And employees in the health care industry are very well paid in the U.S. As far as I know a nurse in the U.S. earn more than double what a nurse in Germany earns.

The percentage of GDP that is used for health care rised in the U.S. from about 9% in 1980 to about 17% now. In Germany it rised from about 8.5% in 1980 to about 11% now. I think the U.S. need cost cutting reforms, but I guess that the health care industry lobby in the U.S. will fight against such reforms.
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