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Old 02-12-2016, 06:49 PM
eok
 
6,684 posts, read 3,182,007 times
Reputation: 8464

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Some old retired people aren't really retired either. They get pension benefits and SS retirement benefits, but they spend their time at home writing books or doing day trading or inventing stuff or some such activity that might earn them a lot of money over the long run if they do it right. If they don't earn money at it, it's just a hobby. But while they're doing it, they can't predict whether what they're doing is a hobby or a way to get rich.

"Retirement" is really too vague and ambiguous a word to justify using it much at all. It really only applies when someone with a pension retires and starts receiving the pension benefits. So the definition is that the person "left the job to receive the pension benefits of that job." Any other use of the word should really be replaced by other words that are more specific.
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Old 02-12-2016, 08:52 PM
 
Location: somewhere near Pittsburgh, PA
1,436 posts, read 3,262,263 times
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This subject has has struck a nerve with me lately because I have a 38-year-old friend who is planning to "retire" soon. He married at age 21 and his wife has been the breadwinner ever since. He has never had to learn how to support himself, let alone his 2 kids. Wife handles all finances. He always jumped around from low wage job to low wage job, until recently where he found a job that allows him to work from home and earn about $40k a year, while spending most of his work hours watching tv and playing video games.

But instead of counting his blessings for that easy job, he will quit soon. His wife was just offered a new position that puts her close to 6 figures so he is telling everyone that he can now "retire" and "take care of the house". They rent a townhouse. His wife is supportive of this. He has no goals or ambitions except to binge watch as much TV as possible. Literally. He hates to even leave the house. I explained to him that he is not retiring, but simply dropping out of society to become his wife's 3rd dependent for the rest of his life. But he doesn't get it. To him it's "retiring". And no, he's not joking about this. He was planning this even before her new job offer. They were calculating how much they would have to cut back on in order for him to quit his job.
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Old 02-12-2016, 09:12 PM
 
1,825 posts, read 2,487,754 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
I served on Active Duty for 20 years, I was transferred to the 'Fleet Reserve' and given a pension when I was 42.

During my career I did a lot of investing in apartment complexes. When I went on pension I was able to use my investment capital to buy land and to start a farm.

I do not see it as a euphemism.
MOST people who "retire" from the military go on to a second career and are in no position financially to truly retire. There are rare exceptions. It sounds like you started a second career as a farmer.
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Old 02-12-2016, 09:16 PM
 
1,825 posts, read 2,487,754 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eok View Post
Some old retired people aren't really retired either. They get pension benefits and SS retirement benefits, but they spend their time at home writing books or doing day trading or inventing stuff or some such activity that might earn them a lot of money over the long run if they do it right. If they don't earn money at it, it's just a hobby. But while they're doing it, they can't predict whether what they're doing is a hobby or a way to get rich.

"Retirement" is really too vague and ambiguous a word to justify using it much at all. It really only applies when someone with a pension retires and starts receiving the pension benefits. So the definition is that the person "left the job to receive the pension benefits of that job." Any other use of the word should really be replaced by other words that are more specific.
I agree that it would be helpful to use other terminology for the situations that have been described here. . Retirement has a specific context, although it is hard to nail down an exact definition - therein lies the problem.
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Old 02-12-2016, 10:36 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,779,038 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dmills View Post
I agree that it would be helpful to use other terminology for the situations that have been described here. . Retirement has a specific context, although it is hard to nail down an exact definition - therein lies the problem.
You're probably right. But at least for people still working part-time, a good term is "semi-retired". After I retired by filing a retirement application and starting to draw a pension, I continued to work part-time and considered myself semi-retired. I gradually stopped the various things I was doing and now the last five years all that's left for pay is one project encompassing 20 days every late June/early July, and that's so little that it doesn't merit even the term semi-retired. I AM now fully retired, at least in my own eyes. And I doubt that anyone would be so willing to nit pick as to argue that 20 days a year changes anything about being fully retired. It would be like arguing that peeing in the ocean causes a rise in the water level. While that's technically true, it would be impossible to measure.
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Old 02-13-2016, 05:29 AM
 
2,447 posts, read 2,081,663 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mugatu View Post
This subject has has struck a nerve with me lately because I have a 38-year-old friend who is planning to "retire" soon. He married at age 21 and his wife has been the breadwinner ever since. He has never had to learn how to support himself, let alone his 2 kids. Wife handles all finances. He always jumped around from low wage job to low wage job, until recently where he found a job that allows him to work from home and earn about $40k a year, while spending most of his work hours watching tv and playing video games.

But instead of counting his blessings for that easy job, he will quit soon. His wife was just offered a new position that puts her close to 6 figures so he is telling everyone that he can now "retire" and "take care of the house". They rent a townhouse. His wife is supportive of this. He has no goals or ambitions except to binge watch as much TV as possible. Literally. He hates to even leave the house. I explained to him that he is not retiring, but simply dropping out of society to become his wife's 3rd dependent for the rest of his life. But he doesn't get it. To him it's "retiring". And no, he's not joking about this. He was planning this even before her new job offer. They were calculating how much they would have to cut back on in order for him to quit his job.


Does his wife happen to have a identical twin sister I can latch on to?
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Old 02-13-2016, 05:34 AM
 
Location: Around the UK!
156 posts, read 111,035 times
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It appears that some people consider being "retired" as some kind of right of passage or great achievement. However merely living off some broken system can hardly be considered a significant achievement.

Retirement (in financial terms) should be the time in your life when you have enough money (whatever that means to you?) to live out your life doing whatever you choose. You are not, in any way, a victim of circumstances but truly free to do whatever you want to.

Also, is being "semi" retired not akin to being "semi" pregnant? Isn't retirement a binary state either you are or you aren't.
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Old 02-13-2016, 09:00 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,779,038 times
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Default Retirement a "binary" state? No way.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PatMil View Post
.....................................
Also, is being "semi" retired not akin to being "semi" pregnant? Isn't retirement a binary state either you are or you aren't.
No, it is not at all akin to being "semi" pregnant. Retirement is not at all a binary state. I have personal experience with working full-time and working part-time, and those experiences are totally different - worlds apart, in fact. The difference in time commitment alone, even if there weren't any other differences such as benefits and lack of benefits, is enough to make a radical difference in one's life. Instead of having two days a week off (full-time) we all of a sudden have four or five days off every week (part-time) - that is huge.

One can think of retirement as a binary state, which PatMil clearly does, but that thinking is rigid and needlessly (and inaccurately) categorical.
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Old 02-13-2016, 09:21 AM
 
Location: VT; previously MD & NJ
2,230 posts, read 1,367,625 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by otterhere View Post
It's one of the many things that people turn out to be when I probe them on being "retired" young.


People qualify for vague ailments all the time; fibromyalgia and PTSD are two more now that can't be proven or disproven. Just complain of the symptoms, and you're pretty much in!

Let me educate you a bit. Fibromyalgia is not vague. You try waking up every morning in pain and live with it all day long -- all the time, every day. And take pain killers and muscle relaxers 24/7 that take away only some of that pain, just to be able to do simple things like shower, get dressed, empty the dishwasher, etc. And work 40 hours a week.

You cannot SEE another person's pain; that doesn't mean they are faking it. And there IS a physical test for Fibromyalgia.

I managed to work for 20 years with Fibromyalgia and made it to age 62 when I took SS. Luckily I had a desk job. If my job had required physical activity, there is no way I could have done it.

I'm sure others will speak to PTSD. I don't have personal experience with it, but I believe it is very real.
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Old 02-13-2016, 10:24 AM
 
6,363 posts, read 5,094,738 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ansible90 View Post
Let me educate you a bit. Fibromyalgia is not vague. You try waking up every morning in pain and live with it all day long -- all the time, every day. And take pain killers and muscle relaxers 24/7 that take away only some of that pain, just to be able to do simple things like shower, get dressed, empty the dishwasher, etc. And work 40 hours a week.

You cannot SEE another person's pain; that doesn't mean they are faking it. And there IS a physical test for Fibromyalgia.

I managed to work for 20 years with Fibromyalgia and made it to age 62 when I took SS. Luckily I had a desk job. If my job had required physical activity, there is no way I could have done it.

I'm sure others will speak to PTSD. I don't have personal experience with it, but I believe it is very real.
My other half suffers from PTSD - Vietnam. He never sleeps enough. We all are familiar with that type, but the other - not as much.

I know several people that have severe anxiety. It is weird to me, but I've seen it, so I can't go around saying, you are faking. We are not all the same.

There are things I hate to do, but still do them - for example driving. I am just too lazy. But there are people that are terrified of doing that. I'm just glad that the things I hate to do are because of me just not wanting to do it, and not something that takes over my mind and body.
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