U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-20-2016, 09:05 PM
 
38,230 posts, read 14,933,179 times
Reputation: 24637

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Travelassie View Post
Maybe it depends on the location, but I can assure you that I have seen numerous younger drivers involved in , mainly minor accidents who choose not to report those accidents to their insurance companies, for fear that the insurance companies will cancel their insurance or increase their rates beyond what they can afford. In those cases, they will either settle directly with the other involved drivers for a cash amount, they may flee the scene as it's very hard to prove who did what where when at a later time, and especially if they are short of the cash needed for repairs and the car is driveable, they will continue to drive the damaged car without getting it fixed.
Yes indeed, there are likely plenty of young folks who have accidents and many may not report these to their insurance companies.

But once again, we are not talking about young drivers here, but elderly drivers. In this case, how the number of mishaps may be under reported among the elderly.

But now that we are on the topic, how many times have you seen a young driver shuffle out to their cars, put their walker in the back seat and proceed to plow into another car in the Piggly Wiggly parking lot?

How many times have you seen younger drivers creep onto the freeway forcing cars to swerve around them? Or drive on the freeway at 35 MPH?

Impaired younger drivers, those with cognitive or physical disabilities that make driving difficult, often do not pass the driving test or even attempt it. Whereas elderly drivers do not have to pass any test and continue to drive when it is no longer safe for them to do so and we have no mechanism beyond concerned relatives to get them off the road.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-21-2016, 08:51 AM
 
Location: The South
5,230 posts, read 3,639,125 times
Reputation: 7926
Quote:
Originally Posted by GotHereQuickAsICould View Post
Yes indeed, there are likely plenty of young folks who have accidents and many may not report these to their insurance companies.

But once again, we are not talking about young drivers here, but elderly drivers. In this case, how the number of mishaps may be under reported among the elderly.

But now that we are on the topic, how many times have you seen a young driver shuffle out to their cars, put their walker in the back seat and proceed to plow into another car in the Piggly Wiggly parking lot?

How many times have you seen younger drivers creep onto the freeway forcing cars to swerve around them? Or drive on the freeway at 35 MPH?

Impaired younger drivers, those with cognitive or physical disabilities that make driving difficult, often do not pass the driving test or even attempt it. Whereas elderly drivers do not have to pass any test and continue to drive when it is no longer safe for them to do so and we have no mechanism beyond concerned relatives to get them off the road.
I watched a young twenty something female make a left turn across me as I sat at a red light. She was driving a Chevrolet Suburban, had a dog in her lap leaning its head out the window, and was talking on the cell phone. I sure am glad she didn't hit my car. I can see the headlines now.
78 YEAR OLD DRIVER CAUSES ACCIDENT.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-21-2016, 12:29 PM
 
Location: SW US
2,220 posts, read 2,037,561 times
Reputation: 3824
I just got a new car, replacing my old one which was a 2005. The new one has all kinds of high tech stuff, and safety features...and a 300 page manual. I am slowly working my way through it, learning the most important features first. It has a bunch of different warning beeps, and the driver has to learn what they mean and how to respond when hearing them. At 70, I can still do it, but I'm glad I'm not 80.
I'm rather amazed to find all these features on a mid $20's small SUV.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-22-2016, 09:07 AM
 
Location: Loudon, TN
5,788 posts, read 4,843,885 times
Reputation: 19479
Quote:
Originally Posted by silibran View Post
I agree with you. I come at this from experience with my elderly mother. I had a slightly different experience with her decision making though. We noticed that she refused to make a decision about something from a menu. She was happy sharing something or ordering what one of us ordered. My sis put it down to not being able to comprehend, but it might have been an inability to come to a decision. After all, most menus are pretty information dense.

....

Most of the very elderly, who have had no exposure to computers, are probably no longer with us though. I know people who are older than I who use computers very well. In the next 20 years or so, almost all of us will have had this experience, no matter their age.
These were two factors that were the first things we noticed about my MIL's dementia. Inability to make a decision, and inability to work with technology. For several years before we really noticed the problems, she would not be able to remember the steps to run the new washer or to operate the CD player. We had to make little instruction sheets with the steps written down, and she would invariably get stuck and need help. Second was the inability to make a decision. She has always liked eating out, since she's not much of a cook, but we found that she always ordered the same one or two dishes at every restaurant we went to. She also stopped eating many foods she used to enjoy, and narrowed her condiments down to zero. If she could, she would subsist on only cantaloupe, chicken salad sandwiches, plain hamburgers, cookies, cake, and ice cream.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-23-2016, 07:33 AM
 
38,230 posts, read 14,933,179 times
Reputation: 24637
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheShadow View Post
These were two factors that were the first things we noticed about my MIL's dementia. Inability to make a decision, and inability to work with technology. For several years before we really noticed the problems, she would not be able to remember the steps to run the new washer or to operate the CD player. We had to make little instruction sheets with the steps written down, and she would invariably get stuck and need help. Second was the inability to make a decision. She has always liked eating out, since she's not much of a cook, but we found that she always ordered the same one or two dishes at every restaurant we went to. She also stopped eating many foods she used to enjoy, and narrowed her condiments down to zero. If she could, she would subsist on only cantaloupe, chicken salad sandwiches, plain hamburgers, cookies, cake, and ice cream.
As we have no mechanism to screen out those with cognitive impairments, she could still be driving long after her ability to make split second decisions was gone.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-23-2016, 03:50 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
21,896 posts, read 14,390,517 times
Reputation: 30781
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheShadow View Post
These were two factors that were the first things we noticed about my MIL's dementia. Inability to make a decision, and inability to work with technology. For several years before we really noticed the problems, she would not be able to remember the steps to run the new washer or to operate the CD player. We had to make little instruction sheets with the steps written down, and she would invariably get stuck and need help. Second was the inability to make a decision. She has always liked eating out, since she's not much of a cook, but we found that she always ordered the same one or two dishes at every restaurant we went to. She also stopped eating many foods she used to enjoy, and narrowed her condiments down to zero. If she could, she would subsist on only cantaloupe, chicken salad sandwiches, plain hamburgers, cookies, cake, and ice cream.
Oh, your story sounds so familiar. Maybe my mom wouldn't run her laundry because she forgot how to run the machines. I never thought of that. I do know she forgot how to turn her headlights off and on, so she kept them in the on position all the time, turning them on automatically when she put her keys in the ignition.

She could never learn to use a computer. She would forget what she had been told, and when she tried to use it she managed to mess it up. She bought a mobile phone and never could figure out how to make it work either.

And, she often forgot to eat, and she seemed to have forgotten how to cook most things. I would find rotten food in the fridge, which she had forgotten about.

One time I took her to a casual restaurant in a nearby city and we walked up and gave our orders and sat down. She told me that she had stopped by there before but couldn't figure out what to do to get food, so she left. There were so many signs! But she was determined to live independently, even till her medical crisis.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-23-2016, 04:27 PM
 
Location: The South
5,230 posts, read 3,639,125 times
Reputation: 7926
An interesting article on increase in accident deaths in Georgia. No mention of us unsafe, slow driving, cautious old drivers as a cause. But we must be the problem.

http://thechampionfirm.com/blog/geor...aths-increase/
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-24-2016, 10:30 AM
 
38,230 posts, read 14,933,179 times
Reputation: 24637
Quote:
Originally Posted by Southern man View Post
An interesting article on increase in accident deaths in Georgia. No mention of us unsafe, slow driving, cautious old drivers as a cause. But we must be the problem.

Georgia Car Accident Deaths Increase | Atlanta Personal Injury Attorney
Actually, no mention of any cause. Article discusses cell phone use but states that research is needed.

Older Adult Drivers | Motor Vehicle Safety | CDC Injury Center

"There were almost 36 million licensed older drivers in 2012, which is a 34 percent increase from 1999."

Can't help but wonder if there might be a correlation between the increase in car accident deaths and the increase in the number of licensed older drivers. Hmmm?

What Risks Do Older Drivers Pose to Traffic Safety? | RAND

" By 2025, drivers 65 and older will represent 25 percent of the driving population, compared with 15 percent in 2001. "

"The study finds that, on the whole, drivers 65 and older are just 16 percent likelier than adult drivers to cause an accident."


Driving After the Age of 70: Higher Car Accident Rates for Elderly Drivers | Trolman, Glaser & Lichtman, P.C. | New York, New York

"In fact, according to a 1997 National Highway Traffic Safety Administration study, senior citizens only accounted for 9 percent of the population, but were involved in almost 14 percent of fatal traffic accidents and 17 percent of the fatal pedestrian accidents."

Food for thought, eh?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-24-2016, 11:19 AM
 
Location: The South
5,230 posts, read 3,639,125 times
Reputation: 7926
Quote:
Originally Posted by GotHereQuickAsICould View Post
Actually, no mention of any cause. Article discusses cell phone use but states that research is needed.

Older Adult Drivers | Motor Vehicle Safety | CDC Injury Center

"There were almost 36 million licensed older drivers in 2012, which is a 34 percent increase from 1999."

Can't help but wonder if there might be a correlation between the increase in car accident deaths and the increase in the number of licensed older drivers. Hmmm?

What Risks Do Older Drivers Pose to Traffic Safety? | RAND

" By 2025, drivers 65 and older will represent 25 percent of the driving population, compared with 15 percent in 2001. "

"The study finds that, on the whole, drivers 65 and older are just 16 percent likelier than adult drivers to cause an accident."


Driving After the Age of 70: Higher Car Accident Rates for Elderly Drivers | Trolman, Glaser & Lichtman, P.C. | New York, New York

"In fact, according to a 1997 National Highway Traffic Safety Administration study, senior citizens only accounted for 9 percent of the population, but were involved in almost 14 percent of fatal traffic accidents and 17 percent of the fatal pedestrian accidents."

Food for thought, eh?
Especially for those folks that are getting old. By 2025 when the roads have 25% old folks, I will be 87, if I live that long. How old will you be? Will you be in the 25% group?
Are you going to throw your car keys away?
I bet not.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-26-2016, 07:31 PM
 
Location: Cochise County, AZ
1,321 posts, read 835,915 times
Reputation: 2869
On the Tucson news for the past several days has been a missing person story. The missing person is a 77-year-old male with dementia who drove from Tucson to Nogales to meet some friends. His credit cards have been used four times inside of Mexico, and the wife says she thinks he got his directions confused while in Nogales. He needs his dementia medication.

Every time I hear the news story I cannot help but think - why was he driving? Why hasn't his wife taken away the car keys?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top