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Old 02-16-2016, 03:02 PM
 
71,599 posts, read 71,751,865 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adams_aj View Post
Driving slowly or cautiously does not FORCE you to do anything but drive slowly until you or they part ways. There is technically no MINIMUM speed on sidestreets, only on limited access highways. Maybe you should leave earlier? I mean, I get what you're saying, but again: no one is FORCING you to do anything.
frustration behind them forces me . end of story . no maybe i should do this or maybe that . our speed limits in the city are 25 miles an hour at least they should do that .

if they are going to do 35-40 mph on a highway at least stay out of the left lane . this isn't about what i should do , it is about what they need to do if they insist on driving .
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Old 02-16-2016, 03:16 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,759 posts, read 7,038,572 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
the problem is study's show seniors drive way less miles as a group making them look safer but the reality is what little mileage in comparison they do drive is pretty high in claims for the mileage driven .

they also create dangerous situations many times by driving to slow and forcing others to do unsafe things out of frustration to get around them . many can't see well or hear well
That, and their reflexes are much slower than they used to be, making it much harder to react to a situation in which they need to drive defensively to avoid an accident. From what I've seen, some of them also seem oblivious to the other drivers around them too.

As a senior myself, I couldn't object to having to having to renew my license every few years, to ensure I'm not driving anymore in the event I'd be a danger to myself and others by doing so.
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Old 02-16-2016, 03:19 PM
 
Location: Vermont
371 posts, read 397,052 times
Reputation: 755
Retesting every three years is a good idea; I am all for it. Of course, not if it means *I* fail the test!

Seriously, my mom was retested (road and vision) when she was around 84-ish, in New Hampshire. She had always been an excellent, careful driver. But at that point, she could not remember what all the knobs in the car were for to turn on the radio, heat, etc. so I actually had to label them for her. In addition, since her right foot was numb from MS, she would actually lift her right leg off the gas with her hand in order to use the brake. Scary! So (feeling like a total heel) I pulled the examiner to the side and explained all the issues my mom was having, hoping he would fail her. Nope. Passed the test with flying colors and the examiner said she never did anything like I described during the test. I finally had to be the one to take away the keys and that was one of the worst moments of my life.

But if I had a dollar for every younger driver who wanders into my lane (eyes on their lap) before jerking the wheel back over, I would have some savings now. Distracted driving is the new drunk driving for this generation. I just hope when I get as bad as my mom, someone takes the keys away no matter how much I kick and scream...and before I need the controls labelled.
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Old 02-16-2016, 03:33 PM
 
Location: Lake Grove
2,753 posts, read 1,975,789 times
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One thing not yet mentioned is the nervousness that seems to come with age. I see it in older people all the time, and I see it begin in people as they get older. I myself don't see as well as I used to, and find myself going slower at night and a little bit nervous if I don't go slower. During the day I'm fine, I know how the machine works, I've years of experience in all kinds of weather, and drive just fine. So in my observation, admittedly not a scientific study but my own observations, it's nervousness, diminishing eyesight, deafness, slow reaction time, forgetting where to turn, can't feel the pedals, and forgetting that other cars are on the road, too. As for the young, they are distracted by cell phones, the radio, the opposite sex on the sidewalk OR in the car with them, and what the opposite sex is doing within the car (especially to the driver), racing around or just being arrogant and going wherever they want completely disregarding the rules of the road and any decency whatsoever. Also not having the experience necessary to avoid or successfully steer through troublesome conditions.
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Old 02-16-2016, 03:39 PM
 
Location: Loudon, TN
5,785 posts, read 4,838,667 times
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My MIL decided at about age 83 to give up driving. Fortunately she lived near us and we could drive her where she needed to go. She had only recently moved to our area. She was having trouble remembering the exits to take and she felt frightened on the freeway. She came over one day, got lost on the way, and called us on her cell. We went to pick her up and she handed over the keys that day. She said she was lost and scared. We know now that she suffers from Alzheimer's, but at that point her symptoms were minimal and she was a long way from diagnosis. Giving up one's independence of travel is very demoralizing to most seniors, but I don't want to be a victim of somebody's pride. We have to be doubly careful in our neighborhood because we have to assume that the other driver is elderly and maybe not capable of driving up to normal standards.

A recent accident in our neighborhood involved an 85 year old woman who failed to negotiate a simple left turn from a stop sign. For some reason she was not able to maintain her lane during the turn and killed a pedestrian in the bike lane. It was mid-day in clear sunny weather and the road was not crowded or unfamiliar to her. She just understeered and killed the poor fellow who was walking with his back to her. No explanation for why she drove into the bike lane and mowed the guy down. I drive EXTRA defensively now.
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Old 02-16-2016, 04:32 PM
 
Location: The South
5,226 posts, read 3,637,448 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deelighted View Post
Heard about this on this morning's Tucson news and thought I'd share the article: Senior Drivers more Dangerous? - Tucson News Now

I was surprised to hear that Arizona has a 5-year renewal period for all drivers. I know that Indiana has a 3-year renewal for those 75-85 and a 2-year renewal for those over 85.

From my parents, I know how quickly health changes happened. We also had to take the car keys away from my father. I also remember my mother trying to scratch off lottery tickets while driving on a very, very busy interstate!

Would you object to having to renew your driving license more often as you age?
I'm 78 and I wouldn't object, provided everyone of any age also gets retested at the same interval and perhaps require the younger(under 50) to successfully pass a simple test concerning when is it safe to text or use a phone while in a car.
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Old 02-16-2016, 04:46 PM
 
Location: Vermont
371 posts, read 397,052 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zen88 View Post
One thing not yet mentioned is the nervousness that seems to come with age. I see it in older people all the time, and I see it begin in people as they get older. I myself don't see as well as I used to, and find myself going slower at night and a little bit nervous if I don't go slower. During the day I'm fine, I know how the machine works, I've years of experience in all kinds of weather, and drive just fine. So in my observation, admittedly not a scientific study but my own observations, it's nervousness, diminishing eyesight, deafness, slow reaction time, forgetting where to turn, can't feel the pedals, and forgetting that other cars are on the road, too. As for the young, they are distracted by cell phones, the radio, the opposite sex on the sidewalk OR in the car with them, and what the opposite sex is doing within the car (especially to the driver), racing around or just being arrogant and going wherever they want completely disregarding the rules of the road and any decency whatsoever. Also not having the experience necessary to avoid or successfully steer through troublesome conditions.

Very good point. In November, I drove from Portland, OR to Burlington, VT, alone with my dog and cat. Two decades ago, I would not have given it a thought. But you should see all the preparations I made for this trip, and how worried I was all the way that I would break down. More anxiety for sure. I know I don't see as well, so never drive at night, but also feel much more defensive during the day. I can't make the sudden moves on unfamiliar roadways anymore so if I go the wrong way, I just wait until I can find my bearings again.

But get me in Manhattan, where many much younger people fear to tread, and I am an ace. How can that be?

I drove a school bus for many, many years in NYC. In those days, you were given a wooden board with the route stops listed. No maps, no GPS. Rookies relied upon the kids for directions going to school; old-timers knew that only worked when going home :-) I have thought about driving a bus again part-time, since school bus drivers are always in demand (no surprise there!) but don't feel I have the necessary physical skills anymore, eyesight being the first. Even with glasses, I somehow feel like I just don't see well enough anymore. And those new digital signs? Can't read 'em.
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Old 02-16-2016, 05:47 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
21,869 posts, read 14,383,691 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zen88 View Post
One thing not yet mentioned is the nervousness that seems to come with age. I see it in older people all the time, and I see it begin in people as they get older. I myself don't see as well as I used to, and find myself going slower at night and a little bit nervous if I don't go slower. During the day I'm fine, I know how the machine works, I've years of experience in all kinds of weather, and drive just fine. So in my observation, admittedly not a scientific study but my own observations, it's nervousness, diminishing eyesight, deafness, slow reaction time, forgetting where to turn, can't feel the pedals, and forgetting that other cars are on the road, too. As for the young, they are distracted by cell phones, the radio, the opposite sex on the sidewalk OR in the car with them, and what the opposite sex is doing within the car (especially to the driver), racing around or just being arrogant and going wherever they want completely disregarding the rules of the road and any decency whatsoever. Also not having the experience necessary to avoid or successfully steer through troublesome conditions.
I agree with this. Older drivers become more anxious behind the wheel eventually. I saw this in my mom, and I am seeing this in my DH. So far he and I are still safe drivers, but I hate driving interstates because I've been in two interstate accidents. I can drive them, but I don't want to. Luckily, I still have good reflexes and good peripheral vision. I can make quick decisions based on what I observe. I don't like driving fast, but I am impatient going slow.

I do think periodic driving testing is not a bad idea for those of us over, say 75. I'd hate doing it, but I do understand why it should be done. I do think some seniors don't drive well, because of the things mentioned in the previous post. I also know that some younger people don't drive well because they like speed and they are careless.

We all grow old at our own rates, and generalizations about the driving of elderly people are pointless. There are too many of us, and we are all different. Same with generalizations about younger drivers.
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Old 02-16-2016, 06:39 PM
 
Location: Florida
5,247 posts, read 3,018,567 times
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[quote=CSD610;43029491]Absolutely they are, those High School kids should not be given a license until they graduate........

In New York city the driving age is 18. Effectively this means 8 million people and not one has ever taken driver ed.
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Old 02-16-2016, 06:42 PM
 
Location: Florida -
8,764 posts, read 10,845,692 times
Reputation: 16639
The comparatively lower insurance company rates for senior drivers versus younger drivers is a pretty good indicator of the real safety records.
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