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Old 02-17-2016, 03:52 AM
 
72,033 posts, read 72,043,164 times
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one of the things that i remember reading is to be careful with the aarp sponsored auto insurance . they offer low teaser rates but the group you are in which are seniors tends to have a high rate of crashes and you end up paying for it eventually .

i have not confirmed this for myself .
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Old 02-17-2016, 04:23 AM
 
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Bad drivers aren't just in Arizona. We have drivers here in Florida who are just as bad. I'm not sure it's not only seniors either. Seniors do drive much slower than normal. We have some drivers that wait to get to the red lights to check their email or send a text. It's almost mandatory to hit your horn when the light turns green or you will be there all day. I think the problem is with the testing. Everyone should be tested more on the road than on paper. I have also noticed some people when lost, just stop where they are and have no consideration that they are holding up traffic.
Bicycles also have no place on the highway. They need more bike paths. I'm not sure it's safe riding with the flow of traffic either. Think about it, you're riding your bike with the flow of traffic, someone's texting, they run off the road and hit you from behind. You're never going to know who hit you, you couldn't describe the car or anything.
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Old 02-17-2016, 04:54 AM
 
Location: Tucson for awhile longer
8,872 posts, read 13,584,229 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AZDesertBrat View Post
...I don't think 'most' senior drivers are any worse than anyone else. My mom wanted to quit driving long before she did but I wasn't always available to take her places. Her biggest 'problem' was going too slow! I think most senior drivers here do. Well, not me but... lol
Quote:
Originally Posted by V8 Vega View Post
Senors have more experience, therefore better drivers.
Quote:
Originally Posted by CSD610 View Post
Absolutely they are, those High School kids should not be given a license until they graduate........ Seriously, it isn't just seniors in chronological age who are dangerous drivers and everyone knows that fact.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Garthur View Post
The most dangerous subset of drivers are the 25 and younger crowd not seniors.

But for some reason the senior bashing is in favor in society today so we get articles about the dangerous older generation. The second most dangerous are the seniors, but unless the kids are mentioned then the whole argument is meaningless.
Quote:
Originally Posted by wit-nit View Post
Seniors get a bashing because they drive much safer and are more aware of their surroundings than the younger people ...
Quote:
Originally Posted by jghorton View Post
The comparatively lower insurance company rates for senior drivers versus younger drivers is a pretty good indicator of the real safety records.
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigpaul View Post
seniors are far better drivers, they don't take chances, the worst drivers are the "over the speed limit, got to get somewhere fast" brigade, that's why I don't drive on motorways(freeways) if I can avoid it, too many idiots on the roads these days.
All of those comments above are OPINIONS and they are not backed up by readily available statistics. Drivers between the ages of 50 and 65 are, indeed, the least likely to have accidents. Which is why many insurances companies give rebates to customers after their 50th birthdays. But the posting made below by mathjak tells the TRUE STORY for drivers over 65. While many of you may perceive the elderly to be careful drivers because the drive slowly, don't text, etc., those qualities are very much offset by physical and mental problems elderly drivers begin to experience post-65 and get worse very rapidly.

One of the most common accidents seniors have is being hit going through an intersection because they don't see another driver coming in the cross direction. WHY? Because many seniors have far more difficulty turning their heads than younger people do and they simply don't see a car coming at them from the side. The Washington Post reported a University of Kentucky report that said Older drivers are much more likely to die in intersection crashes, and with each passing year making a left turn becomes statistically more challenging for drivers. The study revealed, "When turning left, seniors have difficulty judging appropriate gaps in oncoming traffic and estimating the speed of oncoming vehicles."

Other reasons seniors don't see: cataracts, they don't get their corrective eyewear updated often enough, they don't look in their mirrors often enough, an imperative in driving defensively.

The slow reaction times experienced by people who have such ailments as arthritis, bursitis, Parkinson's, spinal stenosis, etc., make it difficult for them to move their foot from the gas to the brake fast enough. Elders also often take medications that slow their reaction times. That's why another common accident of the elderly is plowing into the car in front of them, hitting something on the roadside, or driving up onto the sidewalk.

Someone else here mentioned an older driver who became lost because she couldn't comprehend directional signs and later turned out to have Alzheimer's. Becoming lost, or being excessively fearful of getting lost, is indeed one of the first indicators of developing dementia disorders. Long before other symptoms occur, elderly drivers are often unable to negotiate any changes in routes they are used to driving or they simply cannot drive in unfamiliar places.

The following post is valuable because it contains verified facts rather than opinions based on anecdotal information.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
usa today

Fatality rates for drivers begin to climb after age 65, according to a recent study by Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh and the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety. From ages 75 to 84, the rate of about three deaths per 100 million miles driven is equal to the death rate of teenage drivers. For drivers 85 and older, the fatality rate skyrockets to nearly four times higher than that for teens.

The numbers are particularly daunting at a time when the U.S. Census Bureau projects there will be 9.6 million people 85 and older by 2030, up 73% from today. Road safety analysts predict that by 2030, when all baby boomers are at least 65, they will be responsible for 25% of all fatal crashes. In 2005, 11% of fatal crashes involved drivers that old.

The only measure scientifically proven to lower the rate of fatal crashes involving elderly drivers is forcing the seniors to appear at motor vehicle departments in person to renew their licenses, says the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS), citing a 1995 study in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

U.S. Census Bureau data published in 2012 offers a small snapshot into the actual number of crashes for each age group. Drivers 19 and under accounted for 4.9% of all car accidents, while drivers 75 and older accounted for 6.5%.
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Old 02-17-2016, 07:07 AM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
3,746 posts, read 4,228,956 times
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Youthful drivers tend to improve with on road experience, elderly drivers tend to worsen because of diminishing capacity.

There is no reason for a senior to oppose a retesting other than he's afraid he will fail the test. Driving is not an entitlement. If you can't pass a driving test, you shouldn't be on the road.
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Old 02-17-2016, 08:32 AM
 
Location: Land of the Great Bears
3,510 posts, read 1,935,781 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jukesgrrl View Post

The following post is valuable because it contains verified facts rather than opinions based on anecdotal information.
One of the things it says is that requiring seniors to show up in person to renew their license, not a road test is the only "scientifically proven" way to reduce senior accidents.

So, there is a point to going in for just an eye test.

It had occurred to me that most seniors would pass a basic performance driver's test, even if they had diminished capabilities, and that it would be a waste of time and resources for DMV's to require this.

However, 85 seems to be a threshold where driving performance really takes a dive, so maybe performance testing these folks would be fruitful.

Here's a link to story from California about this issue. Note that the AARP fights legislation targeting senior drivers, and that the words "appears to correlate" are more accurate than "scientifically proven".

Should older drivers undergo road tests to keep licenses? - ContraCostaTimes.com

"Jessica Cicchino, a senior research scientist with the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, stressed that while driver accident rates rise as people age, overall rates for seniors have been trending downward. Also, requiring seniors to renew their licenses in person appears to correlate with lower fatality rates based on the limited data available, she said, while road-testing requirements did not appear to affect accident or death rates."
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Old 02-17-2016, 11:16 AM
 
Location: Deep In The Heart of Texas
1,614 posts, read 1,276,586 times
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Here in Tx you have to renew every 6 years and after the first 6 years you can renew online one time and then have to go in in person at 12 years so they can do the eye test and take a new photo. Makes sense. Now this applies until you turn 80 and then you must go in in person for all renewals.


I only think seniors are dangerous when they can no longer handle the car, traffic, and obey the rules. Some cannot see too good. But the majority are no more dangerous than a driver of any age. In fact they have much more experience and are usually more responsible and patient.
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Old 02-17-2016, 01:26 PM
 
Location: Cochise County, AZ
1,324 posts, read 841,779 times
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Do you think that today's design of cars have anything to do with seniors feeling more nervous when driving?

I was thinking about this today while driving. The big, older cars that were gas guzzlers had front and rear ends that were easily visible. With the design of cars to be more streamlined, I cannot see either the front end or the rear end of my car. But I'm also only 5'2" so don't know if this is true for those taller than myself.
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Old 02-17-2016, 01:40 PM
 
Location: Verde Valley AZ
8,631 posts, read 9,712,181 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deelighted View Post
Do you think that today's design of cars have anything to do with seniors feeling more nervous when driving?

I was thinking about this today while driving. The big, older cars that were gas guzzlers had front and rear ends that were easily visible. With the design of cars to be more streamlined, I cannot see either the front end or the rear end of my car. But I'm also only 5'2" so don't know if this is true for those taller than myself.

I definitely need a smaller car. I want another Honda! I'm small, as you know, and my Honda just 'fit me'. My Buick is too big. I have a blind spot on each side of my windshield where the posts are and it makes me nervous at four way stops! I can't see the front or rear of my car either. Taller people can see more than you and I can, for sure!
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Old 02-17-2016, 01:52 PM
 
Location: Wasilla, AK
7,330 posts, read 4,193,442 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deelighted View Post
Do you think that today's design of cars have anything to do with seniors feeling more nervous when driving?

I was thinking about this today while driving. The big, older cars that were gas guzzlers had front and rear ends that were easily visible. With the design of cars to be more streamlined, I cannot see either the front end or the rear end of my car. But I'm also only 5'2" so don't know if this is true for those taller than myself.
I don't know what there's to be nervous about. Today's vehicles have a plethora of safety and convenience features that should make driving much safer for anyone, regardless of age. The problem is that most seniors know nothing about those features. When I asked one acquantence, who takes a lot of long trips, as to why he didn't get adaptive cruise control on his recent purchase, he said he would have had he known it existed. Adaptive cruise control has been around for two decades now! Seniors should be buying vehicles that have adaptive cruise control, lane departure warning, blind spot monitoring, rear cross traffic alert, collision warning, autonomous emergency braking with pedestrian detection, and surround view. These features are readily available on mid-sized sedans. The problem is that seniors are averse to getting the technology that would make them and others safer.
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Old 02-17-2016, 02:00 PM
 
14,276 posts, read 24,046,632 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlaskaErik View Post
I don't know what there's to be nervous about. Today's vehicles have a plethora of safety and convenience features that should make driving much safer for anyone, regardless of age. The problem is that most seniors know nothing about those features. When I asked one acquantence, who takes a lot of long trips, as to why he didn't get adaptive cruise control on his recent purchase, he said he would have had he known it existed. Adaptive cruise control has been around for two decades now! Seniors should be buying vehicles that have adaptive cruise control, lane departure warning, blind spot monitoring, rear cross traffic alert, collision warning, autonomous emergency braking with pedestrian detection, and surround view. These features are readily available on mid-sized sedans. The problem is that seniors are averse to getting the technology that would make them and others safer.

Readily available on vehicles with price tags approaching $35k or more. Most of my neighbors are looking for affordable vehicles well under $25k or are driving cars over 10 years old.

Most dealers are more interested in selling models that they have in stock as opposed to some of the heavily optioned vehicles that will need to be special ordered. Even in the Tucson area, most sales people do NOT start off by talking about the safety features of the vehicle unless the customer asks about them.
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