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Old 02-23-2016, 07:51 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,740,386 times
Reputation: 32304

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Quote:
Originally Posted by marino760 View Post
I really do feel badly for people that just can't quit working not because they need the money, but because that is what their lives are about. Work is not more than a desired distraction from life for some.
There it is again, the notion that "life" is everything apart from work. There is no life without work, actually, unless one is born with a silver spoon in one's mouth. It has always been so, as even our hunter-gatherer ancestors had to work hard to be successful in their hunting and gathering, being "successful" meaning in that case starying alive long enough to produce offspring and protecting the offspring until they grow into adults. Work is about developing skills and competency, about being responsible for oneself, about the satisfaction of being valued by others and the satisfaction of being of service to others.

Why do you feel badly for people who are doing what they want to do? If a person retires and pursues his woodworking hobby by making furniture and other things, for example, that person is doing what he wants to do and we don't feel badly for him. But the minute we apply the category of "work" there seems to be some arbitrary and automatic negativity that comes into play. What if our hobbyist woodworker starts to sell some of what he makes? Is it now work, and is that bad?

I find the whole knee-jerk anti-work stance non-sensical and ridiculous. I am happily retired, glad for my increased free time. But work was never a "distraction from life"; rather, it was part of life, not separate from it. The five weeks that I work every summer (even now at age 71) is something I look forward to eagerly; getting paid does not automatically make it a chore, or a "distraction from life". And no one should feel badly for me because I work for pay for five weeks every year, just as no one should feel badly for people whose lives are about their work. Those people have the satisfaction of human interaction, the satisfaction of meeting challenges, and the pleasure of making a contribution. Sure, all of those things can be had when one is fully retired as well. But why does getting them through work merit the criticism and scorn?
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Old 02-23-2016, 08:36 AM
 
Location: Idaho
1,454 posts, read 1,155,436 times
Reputation: 5492
Quote:
Originally Posted by marino760 View Post
I really do feel badly for people that just can't quit working not because they need the money, but because that is what their lives are about. Work is not more than a desired distraction from life for some.
Yes, work is not more than a desired distraction from life for SOME but there is nothing wrong with people who think that work is their life. If they derive satisfaction and fulfillment from their work, why should anyone feel sorry for them?

I feel sorry for the people who can't quit working because they NEED the money but not for the people who continue to work even when they don't need the money. The former group can be very unhappy, dread their work, feel entrapped and burdened. For the latter group, IMO, their work could be a happy, fulfilled engagement and not a distraction from what they think is their life.
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Old 02-23-2016, 06:45 PM
 
5,426 posts, read 3,450,730 times
Reputation: 13709
With millions of different types of work and jobs in the world at millions of different workplaces, all work is not equally engaging, equally satisfying, equally interesting.

And finding other work or other jobs is not always feasible or possible.

So people who do less interesting work which is a grind physically or mentally may not rhapsodize about love for it or like of it nor are they able to do it daily with happiness or eagerness.

Why would they? Not everyone is lucky enough to have jobs and work they enjoy.

And telling them to find other jobs or other work is not always possible or feasible....it also just means that someone else will move into that position/job and may also find it to be a grind because that is the nature of the tedious tasks involved.

There are a huge number of jobs in the world which may not be engaging or interesting....and are something to get through in order to earn money. One can try to make the best of any job, yes....

It is not difficult to understand how some people who have tedious jobs beset with problems or work lacking in satisfaction, or jobs consisting of mind-numbing tasks would not rhapsodize about them.
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Old 02-23-2016, 06:45 PM
 
1,734 posts, read 1,949,697 times
Reputation: 3901
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
It's been surprising to me over the years how many posters in the Retirement Forum hate(d) their jobs with a passion. They use metaphors like being in prison, being a slave, and other sorts of wild ranting. They talk as if a person only starts to live and to enjoy life at the point of retirement, whereas my feeling is work is part of life, not separate from it.

I understand being glad to be retired and I understand the enjoyment of the increased free time; I share that enjoyment. However it staggers the imagination to think of people who have worked for decades and have the feeling that they have not yet started to enjoy life. It is a sad and depressing thought that so many folks are absolutely miserable in their jobs.

One can be happy working and also happy retired; the two are not mutually exclusive.

Just one person's view, here: Personally, I derive enormous satisfaction from the fact that I have discharged my duty at a high level of capability.
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Old 02-24-2016, 11:16 AM
 
3,945 posts, read 3,263,788 times
Reputation: 11320
In one of the best books he ever wrote, author Studs Terkel allowed us a view into the complex world of work and how it is experienced by us. Titled, Working, it was a book that for the most part was a collection of testimonials from people of various employment backgrounds, the joy of some when compared to the pain of others was instructive to say the least. The sum of our experiences as workers has produced a ton of misunderstanding among us, it isn't a simple thing to ponder; the state of mind of others.

We tend to think of work in terms that we can understand, that's to say that we really only "know" the truth of any work experience as a thing "we" experience, beyond our own experience lies that murky turf of guessing and extrapolation of speculation. If your work was done on your knees, bent at the waist, pounding nails into a roofing material you most likely wouldn't be pining away for the "good o'l days of your work, coal mining, steel mill hearth tender, and a sundry of other grueling jobs seldom evoke the kind of emotions experienced by those whose work was a thing of deep commitment and a source of personal pride.

I've come to an understanding of both those whose work was a thing of satisfaction, and those whose dream job is in fact, their retirement. This has been discussed many times here but always an interesting read on the vast differences between our experiences. All of us who are retired have found a way to live without working, and that speaks to the fact of our finally coming to some common ground. I'm in the California desert today, staying at a over 55 resort, most of those here are retired, and it is interesting to see the differences in how their lives are being lived..
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Old 02-24-2016, 11:45 AM
 
6,316 posts, read 5,058,385 times
Reputation: 12831
Quote:
Originally Posted by jertheber View Post
We tend to think of work in terms that we can understand, that's to say that we really only "know" the truth of any work experience as a thing "we" experience, beyond our own experience lies that murky turf of guessing and extrapolation of speculation. If your work was done on your knees, bent at the waist, pounding nails into a roofing material you most likely wouldn't be pining away for the "good o'l days of your work, coal mining, steel mill hearth tender, and a sundry of other grueling jobs seldom evoke the kind of emotions experienced by those whose work was a thing of deep commitment and a source of personal pride.
I've done lots of manual labor in my lifetime - I always took pride in what I did and how I did it. Maybe I did not love it when I was doing it because it was hard, but I did it well.

You would be surprised at how many people out there take pride in their physical labor and are committed to it.
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Old 02-24-2016, 08:57 PM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,487,261 times
Reputation: 29071
Quote:
Originally Posted by GreenGene View Post
My dream job would not have me working more than 40 hours a week - any job that would have me working more than 40 hours would be a nightmare job, not a "dream" job - so there's nothing here for me to discuss.
Agreed. Not enough energy and no desire. Now I might be tempted by a job with no responsibilities, no requirements and no hours but with a reasonable paycheck for being as foot loose and fancy free as I am now.
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Old 11-04-2018, 04:15 PM
 
Location: Houston/Brenham
4,121 posts, read 4,699,224 times
Reputation: 7578
Quote:
Originally Posted by rodentraiser View Post
My full time dream job is not having to have a job.
Quote for truth!
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Old 11-04-2018, 04:42 PM
 
Location: Planet Woof
3,139 posts, read 3,509,293 times
Reputation: 9889
Quote:
Originally Posted by Just Conversation View Post
There has been plenty of posts about the age of the candidates for the Presidency, especially about Bernie, age 74. Most of the people who say age is not an issue I suspect are not in their 70s. They don't know how it feels to be in their 70s.

So thought I would change the question somewhat and ask the people who know best what it is like to be old. People on a retirement board!

So if you could go from retirement into a new dream job but it was full time plus with long days and nights of working, would you want to end your retirement and go back into the workforce. Would YOU have the energy and drive to work 40, 50, 60 hours a week at work and have lots of responsibility? Would your old age catch up with you and cause you to slow down or would the fact that this is your dream job give you the energy to do a great job, regardless of the hours you work. Please discuss.
I would not have considered a job like this a "dream job" when I was working. Physically and mentally at age 63 I probably could hack it but I would not want to spend my days like this now or in the past.

I am living my "dream lifestyle" now with retirement income and a part time self employed role that I love. My time is my own. No more wasting it.
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Old 11-04-2018, 05:06 PM
 
Location: SoCal
13,232 posts, read 6,335,450 times
Reputation: 9854
This thread reminds me that I miss Escort_Rider. I did exchange some emails with him before he was gone.
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