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Old 02-22-2016, 08:57 AM
 
Location: Copenhagen, Denmark
10,529 posts, read 8,778,692 times
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I have been living in Denmark for over 20 years as a permanent resident. Health care is free. I enrolled in US Medicare when i was 65. I am now 72. I did not enroll in the full plan, and have no private health insurance in the US, so I pay nothing in/to the US. If I move back to the US at some point will I be stuck with paying the much higher cost of health insurance due to the many years of non-payment? I guess so, but I am not 100% sure. What is the annual penalty?
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Old 02-22-2016, 11:02 AM
 
462 posts, read 353,321 times
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Thats a good question. I plan on moving overseas myself in the not too distant future so I will need to ponder this question as well. I believe that if you are enrolled in Medicare and are currently paying premiums you are covered, but you had better check with them to be sure.
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Old 02-22-2016, 02:06 PM
 
Location: OH>IL>CO>CT
5,239 posts, read 8,423,860 times
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Some reading here may help you understand the possible issues, and what to discuss with Medicare if you contact them. There are a few exceptions to the Part B & D penalties. Being covered by a National Health Service is one. The Part B penalty for late enrollment is 10% for each 12 month period you missed.

Dealing with Medicare as an expat: When and how to enroll | GOODCARE.COM
Also
https://www.americansabroad.org/basic-medicare/ where it says:
"If you already live abroad, you should consult with the Federal Benefits Unit of the American embassy serving the country where you reside for personalized advice. They have direct access to the Social Security files, and have experience with problems specific to people residing outside the US."

More at Medicare and The American Expat : Blog : Expat Info Desk
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Old 02-22-2016, 04:07 PM
 
197 posts, read 161,154 times
Reputation: 1122
I have no expert advice to this specific question.

My related question would be: can a US citizen who has been domiciled overseas and not paid US taxes receive Medicare benefits?

In my case, I am a UK citizen but haven't paid UK taxes for decades.When I go there...sometimes for extended periods....I do not claim free care through the National Health Service. I am not entitled to as a non UK taxpayer.

I'm not making an entitlement point , I am merely seeking information.
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Old 02-22-2016, 05:38 PM
 
Location: OH>IL>CO>CT
5,239 posts, read 8,423,860 times
Reputation: 7191
Quote:
Originally Posted by ukgirl49 View Post
I have no expert advice to this specific question.

My related question would be: can a US citizen who has been domiciled overseas and not paid US taxes receive Medicare benefits?

In my case, I am a UK citizen but haven't paid UK taxes for decades.When I go there...sometimes for extended periods....I do not claim free care through the National Health Service. I am not entitled to as a non UK taxpayer.

I'm not making an entitlement point , I am merely seeking information.
In general, a US Citizen needs to have worked and paid payroll taxes for at least 10 years to be eligible for Medicare. It does not need to be the last 10 years. If not, they can "buy into" Part A Hospital coverage, which is normally no cost, but the premium is about $400/month, plus the $105/month for Part B Medical coverage. There is also a way to just buy Part B.

There are possible penalties if enrollment is later than age 65.

See https://www.socialsecurity.gov/pubs/EN-05-10043.pdf for more detail.

Simple, no ?.............
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Old 02-23-2016, 05:21 AM
 
12,744 posts, read 14,101,964 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ukgirl49 View Post
I have no expert advice to this specific question.

My related question would be: can a US citizen who has been domiciled overseas and not paid US taxes receive Medicare benefits?....
Not an answer, but just a point.

If you are a U.S. citizen you cannot walk away from paying U.S. taxes simply because you are domiciled abroad. Your worldwide income is taxable by the U.S. IRS.

If you are earning income overseas from a foreign company, then there will be no payment into the U.S. Social Security scheme but that does not mean that you necessarily do not pay taxes to the U.S. on the income you earned.

So, there are two different points here.
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Old 02-23-2016, 12:00 PM
 
5,370 posts, read 5,660,568 times
Reputation: 5485
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frihed89 View Post
I have been living in Denmark for over 20 years as a permanent resident. Health care is free. I enrolled in US Medicare when i was 65. I am now 72. I did not enroll in the full plan, and have no private health insurance in the US, so I pay nothing in/to the US. If I move back to the US at some point will I be stuck with paying the much higher cost of health insurance due to the many years of non-payment? I guess so, but I am not 100% sure. What is the annual penalty?


Part B isn't it. The medical coverage.
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Old 02-23-2016, 03:05 PM
 
197 posts, read 161,154 times
Reputation: 1122
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevxu View Post
Not an answer, but just a point.

If you are a U.S. citizen you cannot walk away from paying U.S. taxes simply because you are domiciled abroad. Your worldwide income is taxable by the U.S. IRS.

If you are earning income overseas from a foreign company, then there will be no payment into the U.S. Social Security scheme but that does not mean that you necessarily do not pay taxes to the U.S. on the income you earned.

So, there are two different points here.
Thank you.

I know that to be true as I lived in Europe for a decade but continued to pay US tax.

Possibly I misread the OP. I understood him to say he had paid nothing in and I took that to mean paid no US tax.
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Old 02-23-2016, 06:29 PM
 
Location: NYC
2,919 posts, read 1,594,641 times
Reputation: 7964
Quote:
Originally Posted by ukgirl49 View Post
Thank you.

I know that to be true as I lived in Europe for a decade but continued to pay US tax.

Possibly I misread the OP. I understood him to say he had paid nothing in and I took that to mean paid no US tax.
I assume he is referring to Medicare health insurance which costs us about $105/mo.
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Old 02-24-2016, 10:38 PM
 
6,891 posts, read 7,297,903 times
Reputation: 9791
Technically the OP never said he didn't pay U.S. taxes.
You'd think he would have said so if he did…but he didn't say either way.
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