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Old 03-04-2016, 12:55 PM
Status: "Support the Mining Law of 1872" (set 11 days ago)
 
Location: Cody, WY
9,583 posts, read 10,930,257 times
Reputation: 19216

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I'e lived n Wyoming for thirteen years; I wouldn't move for anything. I'm in the northern desert region but only about thirty miles from Yellowstone. every summer I see the half million tourists who travel from countries around the world for the vacation of a lifetime. More travel from Jackson bringing the total to two million. But I'm on a permanent vacation. I'm looking out my window. I see a blue sky without a cloud. Under that blue sky is the Playground of the Gods, an area of fantastic rock formations. There's snow a few miles away on some peaks over 10,000', but none below that.

I'll drive to town today to do some shopping. There won't be any traffic. There won't be any panhandlers or predators. I'll still have a gun in my pocket and I need no one's permission to carry it. Except for the cars it won't look much different in town from fifty or sixty years ago.

There are no income inheritance or estate taxes here. Sales tax is four percent; real estate tax is about 1/2 of 1 percent of market value.

Winters can be chilly, but much of the state sees snow come in the morning and be gone in the afternoon. Hot humid summer days are unknown.

There's no diversity but, unlike Vermont, few liberals. So many have moved here as refugees. I was one coming from sad, broken Colorado. Here I'm right at home as a political conservative. Freedom is in the air. This is still the America we once knew. This is paradise.
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Old 03-04-2016, 01:17 PM
 
8,977 posts, read 8,112,623 times
Reputation: 19497
It is amazing how little some of the posters know about those 10 states. Since retiring, we have lived in St George Utah, and South East Montana. I agree, they are fine places to retire to.

1: Home prices. We live in a large luxury home on five acres that would cost about 3.5M in our old Silicon Valley area of my home state of California. Here we can afford to own it Free and Clear and it did not break the bank to buy it.

2: Cost of living. No sales taxes. and other huge differences between here and where so many think would be great.

3: Environment. Extremely clean air, we cannot live where there is air pollution. Snow, but only 30 inches a year. Usually just a little at a time, and gone in 3 days or less. Today is bright and shinny 65 degrees.
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Old 03-04-2016, 01:42 PM
 
Location: Just west of the Missouri River
676 posts, read 1,328,713 times
Reputation: 949
Quote:
Originally Posted by jjpike View Post
Nebraska has some of the best hospitals in America, a balanced state budget with a huge rainy day fund. Some of the lowest unemployment in America. 3 State Universites and private Universities, with all of the advance education, cultural and athletic opportunities you can afford. This year I've seen Paul McCartney, Elton John, Wicked, Phantom, The Book of Mormon, etc. in my **** hole little gem. Who's the uninteresting rube?
Nebraska is for those who are tired of high crime, traffic hassles, rude people and everything else that goes with the high population of the more popular states. Whether or not you think it is a beautiful state is a matter of opinion. After sixteen years in an east coast city, Nebraska has started to look to me like a last bit of heaven left in the increasingly overpopulated U.S. More cows than cars sounds good to me and I don't mind a bit if no one else can appreciate its attractions.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fD_iSqmypfg
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Old 03-04-2016, 01:52 PM
 
Location: Jamestown, NY
7,841 posts, read 7,333,167 times
Reputation: 13779
Quote:
Originally Posted by augiedogie View Post
Nebraska? They tax SS. Who wrote this piece of junk. This article is just one of many that shows that media is mostly manipulation, and that the folks who put out this driel are completely out of touch with the general population.
I lived in Nebraska for 2 years 40 years ago. It's the last place I'd consider retiring to ... except for Wyoming, the Dakotas, Montana, etc. Cold and windy in the winter. Hot and windy in the summer.
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Old 03-04-2016, 01:56 PM
 
Location: Jamestown, NY
7,841 posts, read 7,333,167 times
Reputation: 13779
Quote:
Originally Posted by treeluvr View Post
Nebraska is for those who are tired of high crime, traffic hassles, rude people and everything else that goes with the high population of the more popular states. Whether or not you think it is a beautiful state is a matter of opinion. After sixteen years in an east coast city, Nebraska has started to look to me like a last bit of heaven left in the increasingly overpopulated U.S. More cows than cars sounds good to me and I don't mind a bit if no one else can appreciate its attractions.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fD_iSqmypfg
Once you live there for a while, its "attractions" pale. Maybe Lincoln's improved some in 40 years, but you can't do anything about the weather.
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Old 03-04-2016, 02:25 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,587 posts, read 17,582,380 times
Reputation: 27677
Quote:
Originally Posted by DubbleT View Post
Maybe I'm missing something, but again I don't see the advantage of one 'state' over another. I live in a border city and I see no difference in my quality of life just because I'm on the 'less progressive' TN side of the state line. My coworkers living in VA have pretty much the same kind of life that I do, except they get to complain more about gov't taxes and fees.

PS take all these lists, reports, etc. with a huge grain of salt. Just looked at an yet another report (AARP this time) that says Bristol VA regional air quality is great, scores in the top third, while stating that Bristol TN regional air quality is terrible, scoring in the bottom third. This, for one small city that straddles the state line, it is beyond ridiculous.
If anything, Shearer's pollution belching right off exit 3 would make me question this. I doubt there is any real difference there.
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Old 03-04-2016, 03:14 PM
 
3,491 posts, read 5,667,868 times
Reputation: 1700
I prefer Texas
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Old 03-04-2016, 03:58 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,935,948 times
Reputation: 6716
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clark Park View Post
I agree.

Not to put places like Wyoming down ... but ... when I retire (coming soon!) I don't want to live in a place with long snowy winters.

Who doesn't fear tripping and falling in the snow or ice? Or even driving in those kinds of conditions???

The criteria is so bogus!

I like visiting world class museums, going to a renowned symphony, hearing brilliant lecturers and speakers, attending special events that draws in people from around the world, and not the least I still like nightlife like going to a jazz club or having expertly made cocktails in an elegant setting on the 40th floor penthouse with views. Where am I going to get that in the Dakotas or Wyoming or Idaho?

Sure, cost of living is low ... you could probably buy a house there for $35,000 ... because not many people want to live there.

In my view the best health care - I mean the very best hospitals - you get in places like New York (Memorial Sloan Kettering or Columbia/NYU/Presbyterian) or Boston (Brigham and Women's Hospital), or Baltimore (Johns Hopkins) or St. Louis (Barnes Jewish) or Chicago (Northwestern) or Cleveland (the Cleveland) Clinic) or Philly (Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and Thomas Jefferson University Hosp.), LA (Cedars/Sinai and UCLA) ... the only one not in a big city that rates among the best is the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. I think the quality of nearby hospitals should be very high on any list of living places for seniors.
Wow - when's the last time or ever you were in a place like Jackson Hole Wyoming or Sun Valley Idaho or similar. These are places where people with lots of seriously big money buy 2nd/3rd/4th (often vacation) places that cost many multiples of what you paid for your primary residence.

And Ted Turner - second largest landholder in the US - 2 million acres - owns a lot of land in these states. So there must be something going for the area.

Turner Ranches Map - Turner Enterprises

I don't think you're familiar with all the great medical places in the US. How about MD Anderson in Houston? Or Mayo here in JAX? If you ever need an organ transplant - I guarantee you'll be better off here at Mayo JAX than anywhere in the NE because of its very short wait lists (which some attribute to our moto donors - young healthy motorcycle riders who get killed in motorcycle crashes - no helmet law in Florida). We've met people who actually moved here to get on the transplant list at Mayo JAX - including gay guys from elsewhere who need liver transplants as a result of Hep C (although that may be a thing of the past with the new Hep C drugs).

IOW - don't belittle places you don't know simply out of ignorance. Because they're in "flyover country" and your only experience is possibly flying over them. I've lived where you lived now - and I can tell you I wouldn't go back to live there in a million years. If only because of the weather. If it works for you - fine - but it is not my cup of tea.

And - to Happy In Wyoming - be honest - how cold does it get in Wyoming in the winter (have only been there once - in the winter - and it was plenty cold)? Looks like you'll have snow next week. for me. If all this global warming stuff happens - perhaps Wyoming will be the great place to retire in the 22nd century ? Note that I would have been perfectly happy to have a winter place in Florida - and a summer place in somewhere like Wyoming (beautiful place) when we were younger. But my husband and I were always the non-handy type - and owning even 1 house and keeping it up has always been a stretch for us. Of course - as we've gotten older - 2 places are out of the question. I think it takes a certain type to live where and how you do. And my husband and I aren't the type. But I'm glad you found a good fit for you. If you ever want to move to a warmer climate - I think NE Florida might be a good fit for you in terms of politics and similar. Robyn
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Old 03-04-2016, 04:05 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,935,948 times
Reputation: 6716
Quote:
Originally Posted by Westerntraveler View Post
I prefer Texas
Where in Texas? It's a very large very diverse state (I've taken multiple trips there and once drove end to end). Robyn
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Old 03-04-2016, 04:10 PM
 
Location: Just west of the Missouri River
676 posts, read 1,328,713 times
Reputation: 949
Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda_d View Post
Once you live there for a while, its "attractions" pale. Maybe Lincoln's improved some in 40 years, but you can't do anything about the weather.
I'm not looking for attractions in my every day life. I want comfort, convenience, low cost of living, and no concerns about crime.

But, I do want attractions close by. Western Nebraska is right next to both the Rocky Mountains of Colorado and the high plains of Wyoming. Wildlife abounds in NE, CO, and WY. I decided a few years ago that the ability to observe wildlife would be a big plus in my life after retirement. I can drive just out of town and see Pronghorn antelope, two kinds of deer, wild turkeys, and (rarely) bighorn sheep--and nobody else on the road.

Nebraska has a number of small historical museums--Oregon trail, fur traders, ranch museums etc. When I want a jaunt, I pick one and make a day trip. I learn something and never have to deal with the crowds one finds in a Philadelphia museum. (Also wonderful, but a very different experience.)

I don't love wind either, but Nebraska has many days with winds less than 10 mph. And years in eastern Pennsylvania have taught me that weather is one of the more manageable aspects of life quality. Dress for it, or stay inside.

Whether or not Nebraska appeals to you most certainly depends on your previous life experiences. One drawback to Nebraska is taxes. You would probably pay less elsewhere.
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