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Old 03-05-2016, 08:40 AM
 
1,228 posts, read 1,264,090 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TuborgP View Post
I think you gave already done just about all of the above. How you organize it for review is up to you and those you share your plan with. Like you we evaluate what our future uptions are and place a price tag and feasibility on. We know current future living options with current price tags and projected assets for. Is it a formal written plan? NO! Is it pondered often? YES! Reviewed? Yes! Expanded on? YES! I suspect you do much the same.
Yes, TuborgP, I do the same thing. I'm finding that retirement is a big deal for me. It is an entire change in my lifestyle... and since I like my current working lifestyle... retirement worries me a bit. Mostly, I think I find the hours to be filled and the health worries daunting. I suppose that I really don't like change even though my late husband told me that change is inevitable and I need to get used to it. He was one of the wisest people I have ever met.

Eventually I will settle into the idea of retirement with or without it being in a written plan.
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Old 03-05-2016, 08:50 AM
 
29,847 posts, read 34,929,245 times
Reputation: 11781
Quote:
Originally Posted by LookingatFL View Post
Yes, TuborgP, I do the same thing. I'm finding that retirement is a big deal for me. It is an entire change in my lifestyle... and since I like my current working lifestyle... retirement worries me a bit. Mostly, I think I find the hours to be filled and the health worries daunting. I suppose that I really don't like change even though my late husband told me that change is inevitable and I need to get used to it. He was one of the wisest people I have ever met.

Eventually I will settle into the idea of retirement with or without it being in a written plan.
Bada Bing!
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Old 03-05-2016, 08:59 AM
 
Location: Paranoid State
13,047 posts, read 10,476,607 times
Reputation: 15684
There is no such thing as retirement. You just change what you do. For most of us, when you stop working for a paycheck, you don't sit at home watching Wheel of Fortune every day.

For most of us, in our work lives, we had 5 year plans, 1 year plans, quarterly objectives and monthly objectives. For most of us, we didn't just go to an office and shuffle papers; we had actual business objectives to accomplish, and our performance (or lack thereof) had a huge impact on bonuses, raises and promotions.

Forget about the money for a moment. It is perfectly fine to apply the lessons of a lifetime of work to planning your retirement. What do you want to accomplish in the next 5 years? What do you want to accomplish this year? This quarter? This month?

My friend takes it to the extreme. During most of his career, he was a VP of Sales for a high tech company. Yes, he has written objectives and key results going forward. Each month he creates a powerpoint presentation of his performance against his objectives, and then stands up in front of a full-length mirror and presents them to himself, identifying what he did well and where he needs to improve. He gives himself a grade for each of his objectives.
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Old 03-05-2016, 10:36 AM
 
29,847 posts, read 34,929,245 times
Reputation: 11781
Quote:
Originally Posted by SportyandMisty View Post
There is no such thing as retirement. You just change what you do. For most of us, when you stop working for a paycheck, you don't sit at home watching Wheel of Fortune every day.

For most of us, in our work lives, we had 5 year plans, 1 year plans, quarterly objectives and monthly objectives. For most of us, we didn't just go to an office and shuffle papers; we had actual business objectives to accomplish, and our performance (or lack thereof) had a huge impact on bonuses, raises and promotions.

Forget about the money for a moment. It is perfectly fine to apply the lessons of a lifetime of work to planning your retirement. What do you want to accomplish in the next 5 years? What do you want to accomplish this year? This quarter? This month?

My friend takes it to the extreme. During most of his career, he was a VP of Sales for a high tech company. Yes, he has written objectives and key results going forward. Each month he creates a powerpoint presentation of his performance against his objectives, and then stands up in front of a full-length mirror and presents them to himself, identifying what he did well and where he needs to improve. He gives himself a grade for each of his objectives.
Yuck! Great for him Yuck for me! That's what great is having the flexibility to do it your way.
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Old 03-05-2016, 10:46 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,775,806 times
Reputation: 32309
Quote:
Originally Posted by SportyandMisty View Post
There is no such thing as retirement. You just change what you do. For most of us, when you stop working for a paycheck, you don't sit at home watching Wheel of Fortune every day.

For most of us, in our work lives, we had 5 year plans, 1 year plans, quarterly objectives and monthly objectives. For most of us, we didn't just go to an office and shuffle papers; we had actual business objectives to accomplish, and our performance (or lack thereof) had a huge impact on bonuses, raises and promotions.

Forget about the money for a moment. It is perfectly fine to apply the lessons of a lifetime of work to planning your retirement. What do you want to accomplish in the next 5 years? What do you want to accomplish this year? This quarter? This month?

My friend takes it to the extreme. During most of his career, he was a VP of Sales for a high tech company. Yes, he has written objectives and key results going forward. Each month he creates a powerpoint presentation of his performance against his objectives, and then stands up in front of a full-length mirror and presents them to himself, identifying what he did well and where he needs to improve. He gives himself a grade for each of his objectives.
I see nothing wrong with your point of view, because it fits you. But a lot of us just don't have the intererst in "accomplishing" stuff once we are retired. I say that even as one who has more structure in my life than many on this board. Sure, I agree just sitting at home watching TV is a boring waste of time and is unhealthful as well. But having interesting and worthwhile activities - hobbies, volunteer work, or any number of things - is not the same as "accomplishments". One of the great pleasures of retirement is ditching the stress which comes from having to have goals and accomplishments.

I am very content with my volunteer work - about 15 hours a week spread out over three days. However, I don't have any "goals" connected with that other than to be of service to young people in the schools and to enjoy myself by doing something I consider worthwhile and intellectually stimulating. I don't have goals that are measurable by any objective yardstick.
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Old 03-05-2016, 01:04 PM
 
Location: Central Massachusetts
4,800 posts, read 4,862,845 times
Reputation: 6379
Quote:
Originally Posted by SportyandMisty View Post
There is no such thing as retirement. You just change what you do. For most of us, when you stop working for a paycheck, you don't sit at home watching Wheel of Fortune every day.

For most of us, in our work lives, we had 5 year plans, 1 year plans, quarterly objectives and monthly objectives. For most of us, we didn't just go to an office and shuffle papers; we had actual business objectives to accomplish, and our performance (or lack thereof) had a huge impact on bonuses, raises and promotions.

Forget about the money for a moment. It is perfectly fine to apply the lessons of a lifetime of work to planning your retirement. What do you want to accomplish in the next 5 years? What do you want to accomplish this year? This quarter? This month?

My friend takes it to the extreme. During most of his career, he was a VP of Sales for a high tech company. Yes, he has written objectives and key results going forward. Each month he creates a powerpoint presentation of his performance against his objectives, and then stands up in front of a full-length mirror and presents them to himself, identifying what he did well and where he needs to improve. He gives himself a grade for each of his objectives.


What happens if I don't want to accomplish anything? That all I want to do is go out on the golf course or hike the mountain pass or fish in a nice quiet cove with no goal in mind except to just enjoy myself?
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Old 03-05-2016, 02:52 PM
 
Location: Albuquerque NM
1,665 posts, read 1,533,977 times
Reputation: 3650
Quote:
Originally Posted by SportyandMisty View Post

For most of us, in our work lives, we had 5 year plans, 1 year plans, quarterly objectives and monthly objectives. For most of us, we didn't just go to an office and shuffle papers; we had actual business objectives to accomplish, and our performance (or lack thereof) had a huge impact on bonuses, raises and promotions.

Forget about the money for a moment. It is perfectly fine to apply the lessons of a lifetime of work to planning your retirement. What do you want to accomplish in the next 5 years? What do you want to accomplish this year? This quarter? This month?
I plan to retire in the middle of September, the end of the pay period after turning age 62. This means that I will not get my pension check for 6 weeks rather than 4 weeks if I had retired at the end of the month. But it is worth it to me because I will not have to submit a performance appraisal self-assessment for the fiscal year that would be due at end of September. So for my last year of work, I can just ignore all the performance objectives and metrics dictated by management which had little impact on bonuses and raises anyway. I will still perform some meaningful technical work that year but can choose not to attend all the BS training sessions, meetings, workshops, etc., support business practices, or be forced to write up my work performance and describe it as if it cured world hunger or I walked on water - a practice that I find distasteful and sort of dishonest. It will be refreshing to leave all of that behind me in retirement.
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Old 03-05-2016, 03:02 PM
 
Location: Central IL
15,250 posts, read 8,581,033 times
Reputation: 35701
Quote:
Originally Posted by reneeh63 View Post
OMG - I looooove my spreadsheets...on EVERYTHING!

But in general about writing down a plan....my first real boss out of grad school was a PhD researcher and he said that you've not really thought anything through until you actually write it down. The way you have to think about something to get it on paper brings up all kinds of details and possibilities you just don't get to when you're only "daydreaming" about something.
But to give a little more detail - I've been trying to come up with a decently close budget to see what my spending would be - better than just the 80% of my pre-retirement. So I thought about the kind of travel I wanted to do - how many trips and how long, how "luxurious".

That led me to ponder that I'd like to do a couple 2-3 week vacations a year interspersed with maybe 2 more week-long vacations and several long weekends. Adding up those "trip days" and putting in estimates of airfare (figuring more for Europe/Asia versus domestic) and hotel costs per night with a food allowance will give me a great idea of my annual "recreational needs". That's a lot closer than saying "I want to travel more when I retire" and never going beyond that!
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Old 03-05-2016, 03:13 PM
 
6,332 posts, read 4,771,440 times
Reputation: 12998
Quote:
Originally Posted by golfingduo View Post
What happens if I don't want to accomplish anything? That all I want to do is go out on the golf course or hike the mountain pass or fish in a nice quiet cove with no goal in mind except to just enjoy myself?
A high percentage of the world's population reproduces but does little else of note. There is no reason you need to be any different. You can look back at the rest of your life and consider those accomplishments to be your best.
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Old 03-05-2016, 03:23 PM
 
71,983 posts, read 72,020,102 times
Reputation: 49559
we just got back from a week in disney with the kids and grand kids .

it was so great just doing nothing but enjoying being alive with everyone there .
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