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Old 03-04-2016, 02:11 PM
 
Location: CA, OR & WA (Best Coast)
370 posts, read 265,543 times
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Thanks for the positive responses. I'm hearing that there are are actually more early retired people out there than I thought. Volunteer work is a great idea, I did that in college and it was very rewarding.

By the way, I started working at 15 1/2 and full time since I was 16. Have never taken a break since then, so the work work work methodology might be stuck in my brain and might be a challenge.
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Old 03-04-2016, 03:12 PM
 
662 posts, read 476,887 times
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I've found that my wants have changed over time, and I'm okay with reinventing myself throughout retirement. I started out traveling a lot, kayaking, hiking, fishing, cycling and swimming. Then I got into home improvements. I still write a bit, but not like I used to. Now I have my eye on gardening and/or doing some traveling for antiquing/picking (I love me some Antiques Roadshow!). I probably won't be able to do both at once (hard to have a big vegetable garden and be away from it!) - so I'll do one for a while, then the other. I also still have my sights on several trips (like inn-to-inn or campground-to-campground cycling trips). I will say that some of the bucket-list items have become "eh" for me....like living on a boat in the Florida Keys.

I think we each have to think of what we want to do now (or soon) and be okay with the evolution of changing "wants".
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Old 03-04-2016, 04:44 PM
 
Location: On the road
5,922 posts, read 2,885,080 times
Reputation: 11311
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewbieHere View Post
I think it's a good idea to wait at least until you are 55 and have 35 years of earnings.
I don't get this. From a financial standpoint retirement is about reaching a point where passive income (be it defined benefit plan like ss/pension or a pile of money to draw from) is believed to be sufficient to support your desired lifestyle.

If someone reaches that point in their mid 40s, why waste an entire decade of their prime of their life continuing to punch a clock just for the sake of reaching an arbitrary number? That is an awful long time to be waking up to an alarm clock every day knowing you don't need to.
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Old 03-04-2016, 07:22 PM
 
7,897 posts, read 5,028,121 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aramax666 View Post
When I was younger I had lots of interest, as my career has progressed, i have become far more uni-dimensional and overall a boring person.
Precisely the same happened to me. In my teens, I had lots of hobbies. In my 20s most of these stagnated and withered away. Now in my 40s, my remaining "hobbies" are working out, reading and internet-surfing. Were I to have retired at 20, I'd not in the least have been bored. Were I to retire at 50, I'd go insane from boredom.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SunGrins View Post
A big snag in early retirement is the social part -- you don't think much about it when you are working but tend to miss it if you don't have something else taking its place. This may sound unkind but you can't replace that social network with your spouse 24/7. ...
Exactly. And things are immeasurably worse if one has no spouse. Whether retired or still working, most of our social connections outside of the workplace are family. For persons whose parents have passed on, who have no siblings, no children and no spouse, the workplace is almost the totality of social-life. Once retired, and thus separated from the workplace, the remaining social connections are meager. What then?

Quote:
Originally Posted by lieqiang View Post
I don't get this. From a financial standpoint retirement is about reaching a point where passive income (be it defined benefit plan like ss/pension or a pile of money to draw from) is believed to be sufficient to support your desired lifestyle.

If someone reaches that point in their mid 40s, why waste an entire decade of their prime of their life continuing to punch a clock just for the sake of reaching an arbitrary number? ...
Why indeed? For the aforementioned social reasons. Depending on mixture of luck, talent and dedication, it's possible to reach a stage where passive-income comes to exceed formal salary, well before reaching traditional retirement age. What then? Retirement is possible financially, assuming that the stock market cooperates. But it is not possible socially or emotionally. We persevere with our workplace routine, not because we need the money or because we suffer from insatiable hunger for yet more money, but because workplace-life is all that we know.

To circumvent this, we need to prepare for years prior to retirement - not merely financially, but socially, culturally, emotionally. Take for example dating and relationships. For a person whose career has flourished, but whose private life has not, there needs to be a catching-up. Just as the person who failed to save in his/her youth must scramble to save for retirement in middle-age, or perhaps delay retirement indefinitely, so too, for the person who similarly failed socially. The ensuing "decade of their prime of their life" would presumably not be wasted, but spent on correcting the mistakes or misjudgments of their 20s and 30s. But as with savings, the later that one starts, the more enormous and oppressive one's task becomes.

May we all plan wisely.
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Old 03-04-2016, 08:29 PM
 
Location: On the road
5,922 posts, read 2,885,080 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
Exactly. And things are immeasurably worse if one has no spouse. Whether retired or still working, most of our social connections outside of the workplace are family. For persons whose parents have passed on, who have no siblings, no children and no spouse, the workplace is almost the totality of social-life. Once retired, and thus separated from the workplace, the remaining social connections are meager. What then?
Again, your mileage may vary.

I worked remotely for five years leading up to retirement and my office was 2,000 miles away so my social network was hardly dominated by work relationships. After retirement our circle of friends was exactly the same as before, if anything we hung out with them more since no work obligations preventing us from showing up.


Quote:
Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
Why indeed? For the aforementioned social reasons. Depending on mixture of luck, talent and dedication, it's possible to reach a stage where passive-income comes to exceed formal salary, well before reaching traditional retirement age.
We don't need our passive income to exceed formal salary, we need it to match our retirement expenses. These two numbers can be quite different.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
But it is not possible socially or emotionally. We persevere with our workplace routine, not because we need the money or because we suffer from insatiable hunger for yet more money, but because workplace-life is all that we know.
This is 100% false. You're making absolute statements regarding everyone based on your own personal situation where your social/emotional life revolves around work. Maybe it isn't possible emotionally or socially for you, but that doesn't mean same applies to everyone. Workplace life certainly isn't all that we know, and after retiring our lives didn't fall apart into bored days wishing we had structure and coworkers to talk gossip with.
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Old 03-04-2016, 09:04 PM
 
9,751 posts, read 6,721,123 times
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Funny to see how many people looking to retire in the prime of their life. Meanwhile folks like Trump, Clinton, and Sanders are just getting started. I know very wealth lawyers that work into their 80s. My doctor is in his late 60s and full of vitality and zest for life.

I suspect that those that want out so early dislike what they do or have NO time to do anything while they are working (perhaps a 60 hour week). I suggest a transition to a 15-20 hour week and with that schedule you can basically function as retired.
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Old 03-04-2016, 09:44 PM
 
Location: Sierra Nevada Land, CA
8,389 posts, read 9,134,430 times
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As a newly retired person with lots of outside of work interests, I let those interests take over and fill my time. Toss in some house work and my days are full.
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Old 03-04-2016, 10:07 PM
 
Location: North West Arkansas (zone 6b)
2,672 posts, read 2,009,077 times
Reputation: 3670
i went back to work artfer being retired for 2.5 years. I got bored and also tired of my wife's spoken and unspoken "what have you been doing all day" remarks when she got home from work.

I like the social interaction at work but intensely dislike working and needing to focus or be on time.

I'm planning on quitting in another 2 months.
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Old 03-04-2016, 10:36 PM
 
Location: SoCal
13,191 posts, read 6,308,074 times
Reputation: 9810
Quote:
Originally Posted by lieqiang View Post
I don't get this. From a financial standpoint retirement is about reaching a point where passive income (be it defined benefit plan like ss/pension or a pile of money to draw from) is believed to be sufficient to support your desired lifestyle.

If someone reaches that point in their mid 40s, why waste an entire decade of their prime of their life continuing to punch a clock just for the sake of reaching an arbitrary number? That is an awful long time to be waking up to an alarm clock every day knowing you don't need to.
I don't think financial is the only consideration. 55 is old enough to retire but young enough to enjoy retirement. I think if not for the long commute I might work until 62. Hey, somebody need to shore up SS. It's patriotic thing to do.
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Old 03-05-2016, 01:19 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,537 posts, read 39,914,033 times
Reputation: 23643
Returning to work because "I got bored" is more convienent to say than the many Real reasons.

I retired for the third time pre-age 50. I have had great jobs that I have generally liked.

I will assure you I have never been bored in retirement! Your choices are endless ( often more endless than your finances). I teach, mentor, explore, build furniture, flip homes, help farmers with harvest, volunteer with seniors, and many other things.

We travel for about the same price as being home, we travel over 50% of the time, as we have for decades, including while working / foriegn assignments. Since we have several rural properties, there is plenty to do at home, and someday we may just stay home, or wear out and Have to stay home.

This year I am on a one year frugal trip around the world (also looking for a place to live that has access to healthcare).

Next yr,... Who knows, maybe I'll go back to work so I can retire again!

Retire early, retire often! It's Too much fun to do just once!
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