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Old 03-06-2016, 08:56 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,729,443 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Retriever View Post
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I don't think that anybody on his/her death bed ever says, "You know, I wish that I had worked longer".


Sure there are people who would say that on their death beds. Don't you read this Retirement Forum? There are gobs of people who retire and don't like it because they are bored, or because they miss the human interaction, or because they miss the challenges, so they go back to work.

You and I may not miss any of that because we have found it in retirement in various forms. But not everybocy is like us. Why do we attempt to remould everyone in our own image?
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Old 03-06-2016, 05:27 PM
 
14,467 posts, read 17,337,778 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
Sure there are people who would say that on their death beds. Don't you read this Retirement Forum? There are gobs of people who retire and don't like it because they are bored, or because they miss the human interaction, or because they miss the challenges, so they go back to work.

You and I may not miss any of that because we have found it in retirement in various forms. But not everybocy is like us. Why do we attempt to remould everyone in our own image?

I'm not trying to remold (or remould) anybody in my image or in anybody else's image.
My point is that, if somebody is bored after retiring, then he/she needs to develop additional interests and hobbies. Somebody who has few human interactions or other forms of stimulation after retirement is--IMHO--somebody who probably never had enough interests/hobbies/involvements outside of his/her work environment.

I saw this phenomenon with my father, who lost his vision several years after retirement. Sadly, his ONLY interest, post-retirement, was reading, and once he lost his vision, he had nothing to sustain his interest.


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Old 03-06-2016, 06:10 PM
 
Location: Western Colorado
11,083 posts, read 12,464,975 times
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I retired at 58. I go fishing, camping, hiking, driving on Jeep roads. Go BACK to work? Like a job? Oh hell no. Bored? Not at all.
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Old 03-06-2016, 06:48 PM
 
6,306 posts, read 5,049,308 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Retriever View Post
I'm not trying to remold (or remould) anybody in my image or in anybody else's image.
My point is that, if somebody is bored after retiring, then he/she needs to develop additional interests and hobbies. Somebody who has few human interactions or other forms of stimulation after retirement is--IMHO--somebody who probably never had enough interests/hobbies/involvements outside of his/her work environment.

I saw this phenomenon with my father, who lost his vision several years after retirement. Sadly, his ONLY interest, post-retirement, was reading, and once he lost his vision, he had nothing to sustain his interest.


you are so right! I have an older sister that is still working after retiring from one job. She says she does it because she likes to be out and about with other people. She does not have other interests that would take up all her time. At least she is honest - lol!

And if you do have the time to enjoy your retirement and your hobbies, please do so.

Our mom is over 90 years old and this last year has been touch and go. We took a day to go shopping and barely made it to lunch before we had to come home because she was not eating.

We (my siblings) have just accepted that we cannot go anywhere vacation/trips etc., until she - you know what.

I can't even say it.
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Old 03-07-2016, 10:25 AM
 
14,467 posts, read 17,337,778 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clemencia53 View Post
We (my siblings) have just accepted that we cannot go anywhere vacation/trips etc., until she - you know what. I can't even say it.

Trust me...I've been there.
I really began to dread the sound of the phone ringing because it was frequently a call from the nursing home, announcing that--once again--they were sending my mother to the hospital. Even though she wasn't aware that I was there, I would then rush to the hospital, to find her intubated in the ICU, which was always a very depressing experience.

Despite having advanced Alzheimer's Disease for several years, she was still physically strong, but for her last two years she had recurring bouts with pneumonia, and finally pneumonia did her in, at the age of 92. Naturally, I decided to avoid vacations during the last few years of her life, so that I would be around during these frequent health crises.

May God bless you and sustain you through this ordeal.
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Old 03-07-2016, 01:48 PM
 
Location: SoCal
13,202 posts, read 6,313,926 times
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My husband was just retiring one month and a half and he is already got consultant work paying high lawyer wage waiting for him. Totally unexpected. It's a big fight. So he is expecting big money. At least he doesn't have to commute. It might screw up our travel plan. But at least it's something he wants to do. Brain stimulating work.
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Old 03-07-2016, 06:16 PM
 
Location: All over
31 posts, read 17,819 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Julian658 View Post
I suspect that those that want out so early dislike what they do or have NO time to do anything while they are working (perhaps a 60 hour week). I suggest a transition to a 15-20 hour week and with that schedule you can basically function as retired.
Many, such as yourself it seems, don't understand that MANY define "retirement" as doing what you want to do when you want to do it". Retirement is not an age. Those that retire "early" more often than not, will be found giving back to the community. I know a whole lot of people that "retired" before the age of 50 and I'll find them working with various groups helping those less fortunate.

Oh yeah; They love their work
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Old 03-08-2016, 03:20 PM
 
7,899 posts, read 5,031,079 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Retriever View Post
I don't think that anybody on his/her death bed ever says, "You know, I wish that I had worked longer".
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
Sure there are people who would say that on their death beds. Don't you read this Retirement Forum? There are gobs of people who retire and don't like it because they are bored, or because they miss the human interaction, or because they miss the challenges, so they go back to work.
Some of us are in creative fields; we're so-called "knowledge workers". But every job has its drudgery and its impositions. My main problem is that whereas I love my job, I hate the geographic area. And since I'm an narrow specialist, moving in effect means retiring. An encore career in a nicer location won't be as pleasurable or as fulfilling. So I can definitely see myself on my deathbed regretting that I didn't persevere longer at my present job, as "servant" of science, regardless of the deleterious impact on my personal life.

Then there's the question of the pace of daily working-life, and how it projects onto retirement. The workday drones on, even if we largely are enthused by our daily doing, and we come to tire of it, daydreaming about its conclusion. But when it does end, I feel guilty that I didn't get enough done, and can't bring myself to actually go home, instead lingering in the office. And when eventually I do plod home, it feels premature and unearned. So there's incessant tension between not fully exploiting the moment, and feeling guilty subsequently. I can definitely see myself grumbling in my final deathbed words, wishing that I'd stayed longer at work.
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Old 03-13-2016, 02:03 PM
 
Location: Pac. NW
2,021 posts, read 1,521,090 times
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I retired at 48. The first 6 months were the best I've had in decades. I was SO on top of the world, I'd attained a goal I'd set very early in life, and thought I was The Man!

After 6 months I got bored out of my mind. No sense of urgency or commitment to anything.

After a year I went back to work part-time and am very happy to be connected to the world again.

Funny side note is that when I went back to work, the part-time job (they are always twisting my arm to go full-time btw) is the best I've had. Killer pay and bennies, better than any job I had before by far.
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Old 03-14-2016, 04:01 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,729,443 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tommy64 View Post
I retired at 48. The first 6 months were the best I've had in decades. I was SO on top of the world, I'd attained a goal I'd set very early in life, and thought I was The Man!

After 6 months I got bored out of my mind. No sense of urgency or commitment to anything.

After a year I went back to work part-time and am very happy to be connected to the world again.

Funny side note is that when I went back to work, the part-time job (they are always twisting my arm to go full-time btw) is the best I've had. Killer pay and bennies, better than any job I had before by far.
"To be connected to the world"! What a great way to put it. That is important to me too. I don't understand the people who are not connected to the world anymore and are perfectly content, such as those who don't know what day it is (a discussion in other threads). More power to them of course, but we all have to know ourselves and then act accordingly. Paid work, whether part-time or full-time, is only one way to be connected to the world. Volunteer work is another way. The number of ways is limited only by our imagination.
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