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Old 03-08-2016, 09:33 AM
 
Location: ☀️ SWFL ⛱ 🌴
2,441 posts, read 1,678,624 times
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I worked in the medical field, diagnostic imaging, a good field to interact with high tech and people at the same time. I enjoyed it immensely through the years, advancing to different modalities. The change came when patient care became second to making money. I understand profits need to be made for a company to exist, but having my time micro-managed to the point of being chained to a screen and keyboard to maximize my skills and less time with actual patient interaction and care was the beginning of the end for me. It started slowly until one day I realized how little patient care I was involved in. The insurance companies started driving reimbursement rates which flowed down to doing more with less people to make up for the shortfalls.

My technical skills were of such value I no longer walked a patient to the imaging suite, interviewed them for medical issues and implants and told them about the exam they were to have and what to expect. Aides did these tasks, so my valuable time scanning was maximized. Specialization is key these days and being able to do the total exam is inefficient. Not only did patients become a body part to be scanned and not a whole person anymore, but I was less too in the end. Millennials coming after me doing this work have no problems with it, they've only know the way it's set up now. They can't miss what they don't know. I realized my time had come and gone: I wasn't riding on top of the wave anymore and was trying to just stay afloat.

I worried I was getting too old to be flexible enough to accept the new work environment of today, but realized I have standards and morals that have no place and I can't work without them.

Last edited by jean_ji; 03-08-2016 at 10:06 AM..
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Old 03-08-2016, 10:20 AM
 
5,400 posts, read 6,548,967 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jean_ji View Post
I worked in the medical field, diagnostic imaging, a good field to interact with high tech and people at the same time. I enjoyed it immensely through the years, advancing to different modalities. The change came when patient care became second to making money. I understand profits need to be made for a company to exist, but having my time micro-managed to the point of being chained to a screen and keyboard to maximize my skills and less time with actual patient interaction and care was the beginning of the end for me. It started slowly until one day I realized how little patient care I was involved in. The insurance companies started driving reimbursement rates which flowed down to doing more with less people to make up for the shortfalls.

My technical skills were of such value I no longer walked a patient to the imaging suite, interviewed them for medical issues and implants and told them about the exam they were to have and what to expect. Aides did these tasks, so my valuable time scanning was maximized. Specialization is key these days and being able to do the total exam is inefficient. Not only did patients become a body part to be scanned and not a whole person anymore, but I was less too in the end. Millennials coming after me doing this work have no problems with it, they've only know the way it's set up now. They can't miss what they don't know. I realized my time had come and gone: I wasn't riding on top of the wave anymore and was trying to just stay afloat.

I worried I was getting too old to be flexible enough to accept the new work environment of today, but realized I have standards and morals that have no place and I can't work without them.

Me too. Was thinking the same thing yesterday reflecting why I retired when there was years left in me. It boiled down to I could no longer participate at the level for which I was capable and had previously performed. All due to standardization and business model reasons. It was no longer fun and I had the resources to walk Away

Do miss it sometimes and I have to work at staying busy but it was time to move on and give it over to the younger ones

And once you have seen it before you know it when you see it again. I didn't want to deal with MnNamaras whiz kids and centralized control. Once was enough. Army and DoD for those who weren't in that environment
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Old 03-08-2016, 10:58 AM
 
Location: Loudon, TN
5,809 posts, read 4,857,183 times
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I worked in energy efficiency and there were always new products and developments to learn, new programs to promote, new customers to work with, I really enjoyed my work and was progressing well in my career. Eventually we had a serious problem with turnover in our department's management, five new managers in five years. Each new manager had his/her own ideas and some overturned the plans and changes the previous manager had made. We were constantly having the rug yanked out from under us and having to deal with contradictory goals and instructions. Many of us got plain sick of the nonsense and retired as soon as practical. I was young to retire, and I told my supervisor 6 months ahead of time. I don't think he took it seriously and he had no replacement hired for me to train. At 3 months before retirement, I finally had to turn in written notice to get them to find a replacement. At that point they offered me the world to stay. I had to laugh because it was far too little too late. My stress level was off the chart and I couldn't wait to leave what had been my home away from home for 25 years. A lot of great friends and good times were left behind, but the corporate culture was shifting in a direction that I felt was wrong.
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Old 03-08-2016, 11:12 AM
 
Location: land of ahhhs
277 posts, read 298,750 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by matisse12 View Post
I'm wondering about retirees who have been happy to stop working in their profession because of the large amount of change which had and has taken place in their profession. Where your profession changed enough over the decades of your career that you no longer felt comfortable, satisfied, or at ease whether due to social change, digitalizing of tasks, automation, cultural changes, requirements of what was expected, etc.
Excellent question, and I can identify with many of your responders. I'm still hanging it there, and hating the garbage dump (figurative) we now have to deal with, but still like the work.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pat Answers View Post
I'd rather not say which industry...but over the years all kinds of requirements make our profession a nightmare. State and local requirements, licensing requirements, insurance requirements, tax requirements, epa requirements have piled on one by one. We get used to one and the next one comes... and then there is the customer service which is pretty much non-existent these days. Oh, here's the website, look it up, print it out yourself, figure it out. People seem less trusting, more demanding, harder to deal with also.

We were just talking about all this yesterday. DH is sure if he were to begin in this field right now, he'd never be able to do it. The technology alone is overwhelming. Working 70 to 80 hours a week, when are we supposed to learn all this computer stuff? Of course, none of this makes things less expensive, it's exactly the opposite. What we once used to do with pencil and paper we must hire a professional company to do...and none of it is cheap.

Sorry, question hit a nerve!
You hit the nail right on the head as far as I'm concerned. What happens when you insert a layer of regulators between production and consumption? Not much in the way of consumer benefit; more, not less, risk; and incrementally ever more time spent in compliance than production. And when metrics are met? Of course more regs, else the regulators would be unemployed.
I can't pretend to know what's in Peyton Manning's heart, but I suspect we share the reverence he spoke of in his retirement speech. I still have that reverence for my work, too. While it's not a physical failing (knock wood) that makes me consider leaving, it's a similar failing, but of the psyche. Burn out? No, more like melt down.
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Old 03-08-2016, 11:55 AM
 
761 posts, read 640,361 times
Reputation: 2229
Quote:
Originally Posted by cdelena View Post
I was prepared for retirement but still happy to continue working and saving... and then one of the periodic restructurings that happens in large corporations gave me a new senior manager. After six months it was clear to me that this guy is a fool and probably won't last in the position much more than three years but it would make it very uncomfortable for me.

I was close enough to retirement that I was able to make a judgement call regarding the satisfaction with my life versus continued employment. I decided immediate retirement was better for me than putting up with incompetent management and a poor work environment for three or more years.

Happy to be retired although financially it would have been to my advantage to suffer through his tenure.
Same here with a similar bosstard. I was job eliminated, got severance, which was icing on the cake since I had planned to go out in April. Not looking back.
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Old 03-08-2016, 02:31 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,698 posts, read 23,696,516 times
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I had to retire due to health reasons and wasn't really financially ready on the one hand but on the other I was more than ready because of the way the work atmosphere had changed so drastically in recent years.

It seems that Big Brother is here and in a big way. Supervisors, managers and everyone in the least bit of control seems to be sticking their nose in the employees' personal lives these days. At the large company where I last worked, we had to take all sorts of psychological tests to make sure we got along with our co-workers and were happy in our personal lives. I especially disliked the fact that all this took me away from my work.

To me it all amounted to some slick psychological testing company shelling in big bucks by selling a lot of mumbo jumbo to my company. Back in the day, you worked together with your co-workers or you didn't. If you didn't you didn't last long.

Of course our health was monitored. It's okay to encourage employees to live a healthy lifestyle but it's none of their business as to how to do it. One size does not fit all. Not everyone loses weight the same way. Not all diets work for everyone. It's none of their business what I did with my free time.

Too much nosey-ness. If I do my job and nobody hates me what's the problem?

People of wisdom and experience get passed over for promotions by people with degrees and nothing else. Bosses hide in their offices with their spreadsheets and computer models and don't bother to learn their employees' names let alone what the heck they do or how they do it. There is an even larger disconnect between upper and even middle management and rank and file than I have ever seen.

I hear younger people complain about these things at other companies too. It's a different work world and I am glad to be out of it.
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Old 03-08-2016, 02:38 PM
 
6,313 posts, read 4,760,180 times
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I was happy to retire for reasons that might sound strange to some of you. I was not at the back end of a profession that was changing. I was a leader in changing my profession through the integration of robotics, computerization and various types of standardization and automation. Year after year I was able to push productivity while greatly improving quality. Unfortunately I worked for a very large healthcare system that talked a good story about rewarding performance but never quite got there. When the recession hit, salary increases totally vanished. I got tired of pushing for improvements and getting no personal rewards. Of course after I quit, my employer learned some hard lessons. They could not find anyone with the appropriate skills who would work for comparable pay. They ended up with a full time employee who was paid a bit less than my previous salary, but they also needed two part timers at my pay level and each of them put in more than half time. I returned and visited the old workplace after my fourth year of retirement. The improvements had stopped and everything was the same as I left it when I retired. One of the part timers mentioned how difficult it was to just keep up without trying to make changes.
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Old 03-09-2016, 02:06 PM
 
Location: Gulf Coast
1,165 posts, read 653,813 times
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Very interesting to read how many different industries have made such changes. I think my blood pressure goes up every month when the trade magazines come and I see the new regulations coming. There is one that just has me shaking my head...and that one is coming fast. One federal agency put in some regulations a few years ago that were very costly to comply with. DH took classes and we initiated new systems. Weren't too worried, because fines were few and far between because this agency hadn't budgeted for investigators in the field.

I read that is now changing and more fines are being levied and they are quite hefty involving jail time...and it could be that procedures were followed correctly, but the paperwork trail not sufficient... and I just hold my breath. This latest change coming might just be the straw that breaks the camel's back. 2 1/2 years to go. I am holding my breath we survive all this that long.
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Old 03-10-2016, 05:14 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,677 posts, read 40,039,994 times
Reputation: 23825
Jail time will give you free food and medical, and plenty of time to plan retirement

Yes... Too many industries tend to self destruct! How much worse can it get?...

Don't ask!
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Old 03-10-2016, 07:40 AM
 
6,899 posts, read 7,303,124 times
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A friend was a high school teacher in a major city school system. Now THAT is a profession where things have changed for the worse. It's crazy. I don't see how a parent sends their child to any major city public OR CHARTER (non magnate). The stories she could tell about charter schools. There's a dirty little secret to be told about how many get money but still don't educate…AND how no one is tracking the money….but anyway….

She HATED her job in the end, and started caring less and less about the kids as well.
And she hated that the system affected her in that way….her because she LOVED teaching. She CARED.

Over the decades I'd say you'd make a great principal or administrator because you KNOW how it is in the trenches.
She never wanted to leave the classroom for higher rungs on the the career ladder.
I'd say, but you could have more decision making power about how things SHOULD be done. She still wanted to teach.

Then about five years ago, it got so bad, she took half year sabbaticals TWO years in a row hoping that would help her make it a few more years until 60 (MAYBE 62). Now teacher's only work 10 months a year. She worked HALF a school year two years in a row. And it still wasn't enough of a break from the nonsense. Each year it got worse.

No equipment, no staffing. A major inner city high school with no vice principal and no school counselor. And no department heads. Then schedules were changed. She was force transferred to a middle school with limited staff. So she was teaching each grade-level every. other. week. How the hell can students retain info if their only taught a subject every other week. She had kids in the class who literally couldn't speak English…..and she's trying to teach 7th and 8th grade SCIENCE!

Her sabbaticals were at half-pay so that had prepared her for knowing she could live on less. Then her brother died and left her some insurance money. I don't know how much it was. It could have been 250K, it could have been 20K. However much it was….she paid off her low mortgage…..and retired. The 30-year-old principal wanting to put HER on a Performance Improvement Plan was the last straw. She found out how much notice she HAD to give, and that's all she gave. 60 days I think. Told no one and retired mid school year…and NOT even during a holiday break. She did it MID semester. She was DONE! At 58 1/2, she'd had it. Took her 3 percent reduced pension. And is doing just fine. It's been two years, And she's not THINKING about working!

I don't teach and I'm done also. I work in a fast-paced environment, under CONSTANT deadlines. Burned out. I just can't afford to retire. So will likely go 9 more years until 65.
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