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Old 03-17-2016, 09:11 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,592 posts, read 17,589,896 times
Reputation: 27682

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Each person and situation is different, but if you're a fairly to extremely political person (as I am), I think a constant "in your face" with what you perceive as "wrong" would really wear on you after awhile.

I'm a Republican and have never lived in a heavily Democratic area for any length of time (probably been in MA like two months total and was more focused on taking it in - not the local politics), but my travels to Chicago have basically shown me that "if that's liberalism taken to its logical conclusion, I want no part of it."

Look at IL. Sales taxes are among the highest in the nation, property taxes in many jurisdictions in and around Chicagoland are outrageous, there are road tolls everywhere (cost me $9 to get from the IN line to Schaumburg a few weeks back - terrible), a state income tax, talk of a municipal income tax in Chicago, etc. Coming from TN, I feel substantially overtaxed here in IN, but compared to the big blue states, our taxes are light. I would be furious living in a high tax state.

Places like Chicago, NYC, NJ, etc., do not share my values at all, and I'm pretty liberal on social issues. I simply couldn't retire in a place that didn't share my values and made me furious with the taxation.

If you're not very political, then it might not bother you at all.
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Old 03-17-2016, 09:20 AM
 
29,782 posts, read 34,880,403 times
Reputation: 11705
House and lot considerations when retiring and transplanting should be at the top of your list along with future and current landscaping. You will be spending more of your life at home and those surroundings will help shape your feelings. Oh yeah in the 70's again today (80's) yesterday and writing this on the deck looking also at the woods and admiring the landscaping trimming we did early. Getting caught up from five days at the beach in the upper 70's and low 80's. I think I have answered the OP question! Gotta love the Raleigh Triangle area! Can we get a NC shout out?
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Old 03-17-2016, 09:22 AM
 
29,782 posts, read 34,880,403 times
Reputation: 11705
Quote:
Originally Posted by ndcoop View Post
I spent a entire week, with no sleep, searching this forum for these answers. Never found a one.
When it comes to transplanting which is so very personal we have to find our own answers. I am reinforcing the point you have made!
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Old 03-17-2016, 09:22 AM
 
Location: Florida
4,366 posts, read 3,706,500 times
Reputation: 4111
Quote:
Originally Posted by ndcoop View Post
1. Where did you move for retirement?
2. How would you describe your experience? (Satisfied / not satisfied / no difference)
3. What recommendations would you give someone considering a new locale for retirement.
From a cold state to a warm state.
Excellent
Take a few years to figure out what you want to do. If you are moving try renting in the community before the final move if you can.
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Old 03-17-2016, 10:38 AM
 
Location: Columbia SC
8,980 posts, read 7,753,935 times
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We retired from MA to SC. One of my main requirements was mild/warm winters and year round golf. Also the cost of living was very appealing. You could not pay me enough to return to MA.

My suggestion is to first narrow down places with a few choices/desires (as I did with the no winter) then start studying the area. Visit online local chats here on city-data and maybe even subscribe to the local newspaper. Narrow your choices down more then make a few visits. Narrow the choices down even more. Maybe get it down to 2 areas and spend more time there.
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Old 03-17-2016, 11:33 AM
 
Location: Sylmar, a part of Los Angeles
3,990 posts, read 2,546,292 times
Reputation: 8525
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
Each person and situation is different, but if you're a fairly to extremely political person (as I am), I think a constant "in your face" with what you perceive as "wrong" would really wear on you after awhile.

I'm a Republican and have never lived in a heavily Democratic area for any length of time (probably been in MA like two months total and was more focused on taking it in - not the local politics), but my travels to Chicago have basically shown me that "if that's liberalism taken to its logical conclusion, I want no part of it."

Look at IL. Sales taxes are among the highest in the nation, property taxes in many jurisdictions in and around Chicagoland are outrageous, there are road tolls everywhere (cost me $9 to get from the IN line to Schaumburg a few weeks back - terrible), a state income tax, talk of a municipal income tax in Chicago, etc. Coming from TN, I feel substantially overtaxed here in IN, but compared to the big blue states, our taxes are light. I would be furious living in a high tax state.

Places like Chicago, NYC, NJ, etc., do not share my values at all, and I'm pretty liberal on social issues. I simply couldn't retire in a place that didn't share my values and made me furious with the taxation.

If you're not very political, then it might not bother you at all.
It's exactly the same thing in Calif. stupid laws that infuriate you even if they really don't effect you personally that much. I'm like Serious Conversation, thanks to City Data learned all about Oregon where I grew up but its just as bad as Calif. Oregon's just as expensive as Calif.
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Old 03-17-2016, 02:02 PM
 
13,321 posts, read 25,574,131 times
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I will be moving from MA to Colorado in two years. I vacationed maybe two dozen times in this one town and it never let me go. COL will be better although there is no such thing as a mountain town that is cheap! But compared to MA, it certainly will be better taxies. I want to get away from humid sticky summers and I want the sight of the mountains. I've been doing my legwork about volunteer things that I want to do and have come up with better solutions that I expected!

Going out there in a few weeks to meet with my prospective builder (have already bought a lot in town) and will have a very low maintenance home and lot. Thinking of a small solar greenhouse for decreasing heat costs and getting into fruit/veg growing on a tiny scale for the first time for personal use. Small backyard for adopted old dogs. It's odd, I live in the very expensive near-Boston area, have a half-acre and lots of trees/privacy, and will be going to a tiny town and will be in-town and close to others should they build next to me. Can walk to the few things that the town offers, including one volunteer activity.

Gotta buy a Subaru. No salt on the roads.

I have dreamed of living in a small Western town with other transplanted people and this is becoming quite the place. I am eager to stop working and living in expensive crowded eastern MA, event though I love my house here. Retiring and moving 2,000 miles is, at times a terrifying thought, but I'm gonna do it.
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Old 03-17-2016, 02:10 PM
 
Location: Naples, FL
339 posts, read 320,435 times
Reputation: 485
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveinMtAiry View Post
Hate to interupt but I have a question. We plan on doing this but one thing terrifies me. What if we move and then one of us dies soon after the move, leaving the other alone in a new place far from home. Did any of you share this concern?

What if you don't move, you both live long lives, and you spend the rest of your life wondering 'what if'? Tomorrow isn't guaranteed to any of us.


My advice - Make plans to socialize as soon as you relocate. Join clubs. Volunteer. Find a part time job (or full time if needed). Make friends that are your friends too - not just couple friends. Cultivate your interests and immerse yourself in the new city. Decide you are 100% committed to the move as being permanent and proceed from there. Life is just too short to worry about the possible scenarios that might happen.
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Old 03-17-2016, 02:16 PM
 
2,132 posts, read 1,006,816 times
Reputation: 8673
Quote:
Originally Posted by V8 Vega View Post
It's exactly the same thing in Calif. stupid laws that infuriate you even if they really don't effect you personally that much. I'm like Serious Conversation, thanks to City Data learned all about Oregon where I grew up but its just as bad as Calif. Oregon's just as expensive as Calif.
You're out of your mind. Oregon is WAY cheaper than CA.

As evidenced by the fact that I can buy a home in OR without TOO much trouble (and hope to be moved by late spring/early summer), but CA is totally out for me. Anyplace I can afford in CA is unacceptable in other important ways, such as crime, smog, or being in the desert.

Portland is expensive - but nowhere nears as expensive as an equally desirable location in CA.
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Old 03-17-2016, 04:11 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
6,586 posts, read 3,674,133 times
Reputation: 12396
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveinMtAiry View Post
Hate to interupt but I have a question. We plan on doing this but one thing terrifies me. What if we move and then one of us dies soon after the move, leaving the other alone in a new place far from home. Did any of you share this concern?
Almost the same experience except we both decided to move to New Mexico and had a house picked out to build. She died about three months later. I pondered what I was going to do with myself and chose to move and reinvent myself rather than sit in the old house in the old neighborhood. Living alone is not a problem for me. I have plenty to do and it will take a lifetime to fully know this place. I'd be a basket case if I stayed where I was. My daughter visited a couple times and then moved here.
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