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Old 03-16-2016, 07:13 PM
 
Location: Michigan
2,247 posts, read 1,470,917 times
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For some reason, my 74 year old mother in law hasn't as of yet applied for Social Security, and I don't think she's applied for Medicare either. She is still working full time, (has for at least 40 years) and getting paid medical there. Not sure why she hasn't, but she's stubborn about some things.

What happens now if we convince her to apply for both of them? Does she get back pay for all the years since full retirement, ???
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Old 03-16-2016, 07:41 PM
 
26,024 posts, read 33,032,767 times
Reputation: 32264
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeBear View Post
For some reason, my 74 year old mother in law hasn't as of yet applied for Social Security, and I don't think she's applied for Medicare either. She is still working full time, (has for at least 40 years) and getting paid medical there. Not sure why she hasn't, but she's stubborn about some things.

What happens now if we convince her to apply for both of them? Does she get back pay for all the years since full retirement, ???
No there is no "back pay". No refund. Basically she is throwing money out the window. Many wealthy people actually never file.
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Old 03-16-2016, 07:43 PM
 
35,108 posts, read 40,287,889 times
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How can she be in full retirement when she is still working 40 hours per week?
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Old 03-16-2016, 07:44 PM
 
Location: Great State of Texas
86,093 posts, read 72,556,082 times
Reputation: 27566
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeBear View Post
For some reason, my 74 year old mother in law hasn't as of yet applied for Social Security, and I don't think she's applied for Medicare either. She is still working full time, (has for at least 40 years) and getting paid medical there. Not sure why she hasn't, but she's stubborn about some things.

What happens now if we convince her to apply for both of them? Does she get back pay for all the years since full retirement, ???
Only 6 months back from when she files.

She would have had to file and suspend at 70 to get a lump sum for all the years she didn't get.
Now she only gets 6 months back pay.



https://www.ssa.gov/OP_Home%2Fhandbo...book-1513.html


You are entitled to benefits beginning the first month in the retroactive period that you meet all requirements (except for the filing of an application) for entitlement. For example, suppose you reach FRA in March 2008 and you are fully insured. You do not file an application for retirement insurance benefits until March 2009. In this case, you may be entitled retroactively beginning with the month of September 2008 (six months before you filed an application).
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Old 03-16-2016, 07:46 PM
NCN
 
Location: NC/SC Border Patrol
21,135 posts, read 21,899,724 times
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Maybe more of us should be like your MIL. She may want to check on Medicare though because there can be penalties for starting Medicare too late such as a certain percentage per year, I have heard but do not know for sure.
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Old 03-16-2016, 08:03 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
21,543 posts, read 44,060,337 times
Reputation: 15155
She's stubborn, but does she have a logical reason for this? If she's in a very high tax bracket, this might make some sense. Otherwise, I don't get it. There's no increase in benefit after age 70 for any delay.

If she doesn't want to spend that money, she should save and/or invest it. Yes, because she's working, she may pay more in income taxes because half of SS will be added to ordinary income - but, in the end, she is robbing herself and her estate. What she doesn't collect doesn't go to anyone after she dies. It's now or never.

About 15 years ago, I remember my brother-in-law saying he was "forced" to take his SS at age 70 - that SSA automatically began benefits. Not sure if they're doing that anymore, or if he was wrong in his belief that he was being "forced" to accept the benefit. He was still working at the time.
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Old 03-16-2016, 10:41 PM
 
Location: VT; previously MD & NJ
2,212 posts, read 1,352,704 times
Reputation: 6368
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeBear View Post
For some reason, my 74 year old mother in law hasn't as of yet applied for Social Security, and I don't think she's applied for Medicare either. She is still working full time, (has for at least 40 years) and getting paid medical there. Not sure why she hasn't, but she's stubborn about some things.

What happens now if we convince her to apply for both of them? Does she get back pay for all the years since full retirement, ???
You/she might want to check her company paid health insurance. I was under the impression that at age 65, company insurance becomes secondary to Medicare, or in effect becomes a Medigap policy.
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Old 03-16-2016, 10:47 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
21,543 posts, read 44,060,337 times
Reputation: 15155
Quote:
Originally Posted by ansible90 View Post
You/she might want to check her company paid health insurance. I was under the impression that at age 65, company insurance becomes secondary to Medicare, or in effect becomes a Medigap policy.
Not usually. I worked past FRA until age 67-1/2. Company clearly told me I didn't need Medicare at all. Spouses on Medicare, however, can be treated differently.

When I finally retired, company provided certificate of creditable coverage which I took to the SS office. Enrolled in Part B w/no penalty and w/no problem whatsoever, effective the following month. My current cost for Part B is $104.90/mo.

If MIL is covered as an active employee under creditable employer coverage, she will be able to enroll in Medicare Part B without penalty when she retires.

The key is "creditable." I've not yet heard of an employer plan which was not considered "creditable."
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Old 03-17-2016, 01:53 PM
 
13,325 posts, read 25,582,469 times
Reputation: 20520
My father never filed until a heart attack at age 75. The hospital put him in for Medicare and Soc. Sec. gave him some $15k for the past. I'm not sure if that's still how it works. He was driving a taxi until the heart attack and I think avoiding the feds for past tax, uh, indiscretions, but they never went after him.
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Old 03-17-2016, 03:03 PM
 
Location: Great State of Texas
86,093 posts, read 72,556,082 times
Reputation: 27566
Quote:
Originally Posted by brightdoglover View Post
My father never filed until a heart attack at age 75. The hospital put him in for Medicare and Soc. Sec. gave him some $15k for the past. I'm not sure if that's still how it works. He was driving a taxi until the heart attack and I think avoiding the feds for past tax, uh, indiscretions, but they never went after him.
They will only give you 6 months retro back pay if you haven't filed and suspended.
I posted the SSA link.

If OP's MIL didn't file and suspend that's 3.5 years of SS payments gone.
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