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Old 03-18-2016, 04:55 PM
 
Location: Cochise county, AZ
4,969 posts, read 3,455,934 times
Reputation: 10489

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I am so envious of those of you who do not have a mobility problem. I was fine too, until a woman ran a red light and crashed me into a steel barrier.

After my back operation, I can do stairs but, it is a slow climb. That's the type of thing that can happen. Heck, it took me months to finally be able to walk more than 1/2 a block. So, you never know.

I moved to a senior apartment building and hated that I didn't dare take the 2nd floor apartment because I couldn't imagine getting groceries up the stairs. That's life.
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Old 03-18-2016, 05:02 PM
 
Location: Central IL
15,215 posts, read 8,518,332 times
Reputation: 35606
Go to the gym for exercise - don't buy a house with stairs such that ANY kind of short-term accident or disability will end up being a major hardship. Do you want to go without a shower for a month because your full bath is upstairs? Or sleep on the couch?

You can have your yard, but at SOME point you'll have to hire it out - again, you aren't self-motivated enough to go to the gym for exercise so that you're not tied long term to something that will be a problem later?

It's called planning and preparation - sometimes depressing but usually practical, especially when it comes to real estate that is not very liquid.

Last edited by reneeh63; 03-18-2016 at 05:14 PM..
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Old 03-18-2016, 05:10 PM
 
1,580 posts, read 824,403 times
Reputation: 2209
I want my next house to be my last, therefore, I would prefer to not have stairs. Also, if someone has had health issues they would be more inclined to be cautious about what lurks in their next home.


I don't see a small yard as a big deal - in my old house, it cost me $ 50.00 once a month to have it mowed (this was fairly recent).


I see nothing wrong with an older person being overly cautious about things that might impact them if they were to become injured or infirm. I think it is smart planning.
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Old 03-18-2016, 05:34 PM
 
6,306 posts, read 5,051,434 times
Reputation: 12815
Quote:
Originally Posted by I love boots. View Post
Not quite retired yet. In my early 50's, not sure when we will retire, but we look ahead a prepare for it. Here is my question. I haven't wanted to do this before now, but we think we would like to buy a place on some acreage and live out in the country a bit or more than a bit. Depends on what we find. House not too small and I prefer to have stairs in it because I think going up and down stairs has its health benefits. And I feel like the whole being old thing is a long way off. I feel young.

What happened? I sell real estate and recently helped some friends around my age buy a cute little house in town. Their criteria. No stairs because they have to think about how they might fall and break a hip. No yard or almost no yard because the maintenance may be too much for them to maintain at their age. They even considered one house that was handicapped accessible because it may some day come in handy. And they have a handicapped placard on their car and don't seem at all handicapped. I know that's none of my business and no I didn't ask. And yes, I know it just may be there are things coming up with them that they know about and I don't. For them they are happy with their cute little house and I'm glad, but it really just got me thinking about some things.

At what point is buying the house with stairs, maybe a little far from the hospital a bad idea? At what age should someone really be thinking about this stuff? If I do it how many good years do I have to live there?
Where did that couple live before?

I'm your age and I live on an acre and a half. Doesn't sound like a lot, but I am ready to ditch that for some place with a small or no yard - Phoenix!

Have you ever been around sickly people? I've seen a lot in my years - father had cancer, mom is in a nursing home - no way do I want to end up like that. My mom kept falling because she thought and still thinks she can do certain things.

Yes, I think about getting old. And I don't think you are too young to think about it.

Have you ever lived out in the country? Maybe you should rent a place. Out here in Texas there are lots of ranch properties for rent. You can get a feel for the experience without buying.
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Old 03-18-2016, 05:39 PM
Status: "0-0-2 start!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: The beautiful Rogue Valley, Oregon
7,291 posts, read 15,345,231 times
Reputation: 9468
It is along the lines of having homeowner's insurance and medical insurance. Do I think my house is going to burn down and destroy everything? No, actually, I don't, but when I weigh the risk and the benefit, I choose to buy the insurance, just in case.

I thought I was pretty healthy and doing great until I broke an ankle hiking. That limited me and made the three levels of the house and the hill it was on somewhat of an obstacle course. Despite a fair amount of physical therapy, that ankle has just not healed up to be what it was.

That house was more than an hour from a small regional hospital and that likely killed my neighbor - it took more than two hours after a heart attack to get him to the ER (volunteer ambulance was busy, they had to find another neighbor to drive them since his wife can't drive).

The spouse also got very tired of maintaining multiple acres, even with his beloved tractor.

We ended up moving to a larger city with a house within walking distance from downtown (even on my bad ankle) and less than 15 minutes to two larger hospitals. The house still has a set of stairs, but it also has bedrooms and baths on both levels. We might stay here 10 years or we might stay here 40 years. When I remodel the bath and put in a walk-in shower, I will definitely put in a small seat and two grab bars when I have the opportunity, just in case. We might decide down the road that we don't like having even one set of stairs and move again, but for now we like the house, neighborhood, small yard, large garage and large workshop. There could be a day down the road where we don't need a large garage or workshop, who knows.

I approach this sort of like life in general - you can't go through life aimlessly (or *I* can't go through life aimlessly) without ever planning anything at all, but you should never think you have everything under strict control and it all planned out, because life can and will throw you serious curve balls that you need to deal with. Aging and health are two of the big unknowns and flexibility in dealing with what they bring is important.
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Old 03-18-2016, 05:52 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
21,856 posts, read 14,364,134 times
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If you were to buy a two story house on acreage now, you might have to move out later. That's how we felt! We left a long term home on acreage that was on two levels.

We looked for a one level home in a protected subdivision with level streets and a small yard. That is exactly what we bought.

For many of us, as we progress through our sixties, house maintenance becomes something we don't want to do any more, at least to the extent that did it before. In retirement you want to do things you didn't do when you worked, such as travel, volunteer, be creative, etc. Mowing a large lawn, or cleaning 2 story gutters, or taking care of a lawn full of roses becomes a less desirable use of one's time.

And, I think a one level home for us older folks is a way to ensure that we can stay in the house longer and more safely.
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Old 03-18-2016, 06:18 PM
 
Location: Blue Ridge Mountains
1,827 posts, read 2,616,516 times
Reputation: 2887
When I was 50 I did exactly what you would like to do! I bought my dream 1886 2 story colonial farmhouse on 3 acres in the Blue Ridge Mountains. AHHHHHH I'm 61 and thrilled to call my beautiful place in the country home. GO FOR IT!!!!
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Old 03-18-2016, 06:24 PM
 
Location: Great State of Texas
86,093 posts, read 72,489,649 times
Reputation: 27565
If you are healthy and retire in your 50's then you have a good number of years to live your dream.
Then when the time comes sell and then move into the city.

That's my plan. This home on 45 acres is not my final home. It's my first retirement home

Plenty of folks living around me that are in their 60's and 70's still doing farming and ranching.
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Old 03-18-2016, 06:28 PM
 
Location: Cochise county, AZ
4,969 posts, read 3,455,934 times
Reputation: 10489
Quote:
Originally Posted by PNW-type-gal View Post
It is along the lines of having homeowner's insurance and medical insurance. Do I think my house is going to burn down and destroy everything? No, actually, I don't, but when I weigh the risk and the benefit, I choose to buy the insurance, just in case.

I thought I was pretty healthy and doing great until I broke an ankle hiking. That limited me and made the three levels of the house and the hill it was on somewhat of an obstacle course. Despite a fair amount of physical therapy, that ankle has just not healed up to be what it was.

That house was more than an hour from a small regional hospital and that likely killed my neighbor - it took more than two hours after a heart attack to get him to the ER (volunteer ambulance was busy, they had to find another neighbor to drive them since his wife can't drive).

The spouse also got very tired of maintaining multiple acres, even with his beloved tractor.

We ended up moving to a larger city with a house within walking distance from downtown (even on my bad ankle) and less than 15 minutes to two larger hospitals. The house still has a set of stairs, but it also has bedrooms and baths on both levels. We might stay here 10 years or we might stay here 40 years. When I remodel the bath and put in a walk-in shower, I will definitely put in a small seat and two grab bars when I have the opportunity, just in case. We might decide down the road that we don't like having even one set of stairs and move again, but for now we like the house, neighborhood, small yard, large garage and large workshop. There could be a day down the road where we don't need a large garage or workshop, who knows.

I approach this sort of like life in general - you can't go through life aimlessly (or *I* can't go through life aimlessly) without ever planning anything at all, but you should never think you have everything under strict control and it all planned out, because life can and will throw you serious curve balls that you need to deal with. Aging and health are two of the big unknowns and flexibility in dealing with what they bring is important.

The apartment I am renting has only a walk in shower. I miss a bathtub but am thankful I have the grab bars, there are three here. It makes showering so much easier. It also has a built in seat but I bought a shower chair anyway.
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Old 03-18-2016, 06:30 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,971,705 times
Reputation: 15649
Quote:
Originally Posted by reneeh63 View Post
Go to the gym for exercise - don't buy a house with stairs such that ANY kind of short-term accident or disability will end up being a major hardship. Do you want to go without a shower for a month because your full bath is upstairs? Or sleep on the couch?

You can have your yard, but at SOME point you'll have to hire it out - again, you aren't self-motivated enough to go to the gym for exercise so that you're not tied long term to something that will be a problem later?

It's called planning and preparation - sometimes depressing but usually practical, especially when it comes to real estate that is not very liquid.
Having worked briefly in disaster fundraising for the Red Cross, I agree with planning for the worst while still expecting the best. Some things just make sense, but sense is relative. My DIL's mother, age 60 and living alone, just built a house in the middle of 80 forested acres. What can she be thinking? Oh, my son and DIL live nearby! But she put all her bedrooms on the 2nd floor. Not to mention the long drive through lonely highway to town for shopping, etc.

There's many ways to get exercise without home stairs. I've only heard of liabilities from friends my age and older who have to use them. Sure there are outliers, like my mother who used her stairs till age 90. She was lucky in that she never got ill, never had surgery, had no mobility issues. Most of us will be challenged in some way past a certain age, so why make choices that might make us have to move yet again.
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