U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-18-2016, 06:59 PM
 
Location: Great State of Texas
86,093 posts, read 72,692,057 times
Reputation: 27566

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by RiverBird View Post
Having worked briefly in disaster fundraising for the Red Cross, I agree with planning for the worst while still expecting the best. Some things just make sense, but sense is relative. My DIL's mother, age 60 and living alone, just built a house in the middle of 80 forested acres. What can she be thinking? Oh, my son and DIL live nearby! But she put all her bedrooms on the 2nd floor. Not to mention the long drive through lonely highway to town for shopping, etc.

There's many ways to get exercise without home stairs. I've only heard of liabilities from friends my age and older who have to use them. Sure there are outliers, like my mother who used her stairs till age 90. She was lucky in that she never got ill, never had surgery, had no mobility issues. Most of us will be challenged in some way past a certain age, so why make choices that might make us have to move yet again.
But some of us who retired early planned on multiple moves.

Being in your 50's and healthy is different then being in your 70's and starting to feel those aches and pains.

Now if you only want to move once then yeah..you could be 50 years old but have to think and plan as if you were 90 years old.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-18-2016, 07:56 PM
 
1,726 posts, read 2,296,900 times
Reputation: 2642
Quote:
Originally Posted by augiedogie View Post
It depends on what happens to you. Personally, I think the no stairs thing is good past 60. Climbing stairs isn't as easy as it used to be, even for me, and I've never had knee problems. It especially comes into play when someone gets sick, and that tends to happen more when you get older. In our case, it just happened. My wife retired last year at 64 and is now fighting advanced ovarian cancer. Getting around the house isn't as easy for her once she started chemo. She's been in pretty good health and then this hit us out of the blue. It happens.
I am 70 and I use stairs every chance I get to stay in shape.

A year ago October I spent a month in the hospital after sudden cardiac arrest. They wouldn't let me do bike riding until January 1, so I would go to the capitol and go up and down the big staircases there. One day I counted 2200 steps total.

My deepest sympathy for your wife's situation.

Don in Austin
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2016, 08:49 PM
 
Location: left of center
119 posts, read 51,163 times
Reputation: 354
My parents, who are now 80 years old, have lived on their 100 acre farm since 1963. They drive themselves to their doctor appointments once or twice a week, a 45 minute drive. Last year they installed an elevator to make it easier to reach their freezers full of meat, garden canned vegetables, and wood burning furnace. So....I guess everyone is different, some people don't even reach the age of 80 years old.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2016, 09:16 PM
 
5,433 posts, read 3,475,777 times
Reputation: 13714
I was surprised in a recent thread when people were telling a 74 year old somewhat depressed woman to do bicycle riding.

It's just that very very very few 74 yr old women do bicycle riding....I live in one of the major bicycle riding cities of the U.S....I think maybe it's even declared as the #1 bicycle riding city.....and I NEVER see any older women past 70 bicycle riding and really not women in their 60's either.

Their are some men in their 60's and some men in their 70's who ride but it is not particularly common. For older women, it's a matter of balance, flexibility, and probably stamina.....plus safety concerns.....pretty rough on the bones & body to take a tumble to the ground on a bicycle....plus being surrounded by speeding bicycles even on nice recreational trails is a challenge.

I remember my mother, who rode a bicycle slowly around her neighborhood, with my father, did a bit of bicycling in a slow-paced way until she was 60 or 62, but then balance problems and osteoporosis took over.

I was wondering if the people who were recommending that the 74 yr old woman in the recent thread take up bicycle riding were anywhere close to that age....I'm sure there are exceptions who ride.....but I sure NEVER see any in this bicycle capital of the U.S. Plus it was pointed out in another thread that younger people do not know how it feels to be 65 or 70 or 75 or beyond.

That said, I'm 68 and have one of the cool funky european type new modern set of wheels that are smaller wheels & beautiful design, but I do not get very far on it. I just tool around a couple blocks. And last spring & summer & fall I didn't touch it.

Last edited by matisse12; 03-18-2016 at 09:40 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2016, 09:19 PM
 
Location: Great State of Texas
86,093 posts, read 72,692,057 times
Reputation: 27566
Quote:
Originally Posted by matisse12 View Post
I was surprised in a recent thread when people were telling a 74 year old somewhat depressed woman to do bicycle riding.

It's just that very very very few 74 yr old women do bicycle riding....I live in one of the major bicycle riding cities of the U.S....I think maybe it's even declared as the #1 bicycle riding city.....and I NEVER see any older women past 70 bicycle riding and really not women in their 60's either.

Their are some men in their 60's and some men in their 70's who ride but it is not particularly common. For older women, it's a matter of balance, flexibility, and probably stamina.....plus safety concerns.....pretty rough on the bones & body to take a tumble on a bicycle....plus being surrounded by speeding bicycles even on nice recreational trails is a challenge.

I remember my mother, who rode a bicycle slowly around her neighborhood, with my father, did a bit of bicycling in a slow-paced way until she was 60 or 62, but then balance problems and osteoporosis took over.

I was wondering if the people who were recommending that the 74 yr old woman in the recent thread take up bicycle riding were anywhere close to that age....I'm sure there are exceptions who ride.....but I sure NEVER see any in this bicycle capital of the U.S. Plus it was pointed out in another thread that younger people do not know how it feels to be 65 or 70 or 75 or beyond.
I've seen plenty of older folks on bicycles when I go to the coast in the summer.
Rockport and Port A.

They look like this though:

Top 10 Best Tricycles for Adults!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2016, 09:38 PM
 
5,433 posts, read 3,475,777 times
Reputation: 13714
yes, one of my female neighbors is in her 80's and I saw her riding a big tricycle just like the one you display in your photo 2 years ago.

but then last year, I noticed she stopped riding it. So I really saw her ride it only one summer.

yes, many beach towns would be great for riding!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2016, 10:38 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,795,112 times
Reputation: 32309
Quote:
Originally Posted by matisse12 View Post
I was surprised in a recent thread when people were telling a 74 year old somewhat depressed woman to do bicycle riding.

It's just that very very very few 74 yr old women do bicycle riding....I live in one of the major bicycle riding cities of the U.S....I think maybe it's even declared as the #1 bicycle riding city.....and I NEVER see any older women past 70 bicycle riding and really not women in their 60's either.

Their are some men in their 60's and some men in their 70's who ride but it is not particularly common. For older women, it's a matter of balance, flexibility, and probably stamina.....plus safety concerns.....pretty rough on the bones & body to take a tumble to the ground on a bicycle....plus being surrounded by speeding bicycles even on nice recreational trails is a challenge.

I remember my mother, who rode a bicycle slowly around her neighborhood, with my father, did a bit of bicycling in a slow-paced way until she was 60 or 62, but then balance problems and osteoporosis took over.

I was wondering if the people who were recommending that the 74 yr old woman in the recent thread take up bicycle riding were anywhere close to that age....I'm sure there are exceptions who ride.....but I sure NEVER see any in this bicycle capital of the U.S. Plus it was pointed out in another thread that younger people do not know how it feels to be 65 or 70 or 75 or beyond.

That said, I'm 68 and have one of the cool funky european type new modern set of wheels that are smaller wheels & beautiful design, but I do not get very far on it. I just tool around a couple blocks. And last spring & summer & fall I didn't touch it.
Ah, I knew eventually I would agree with you about something. Speaking as a former serious cyclist (ex-wife and I rode our bicycles from Seattle to Los Angeles one summer - it took us three weeks and we averaged 75 miles a day), I agree that it is neither advisable nor practical for a 74 year old to take up bicycling for multiple reasons including but not limited to decreased alertness and greater susceptibility to serious injury if one should take a tumble. As you say, there are exceptions, but at age 74 I would say that most riders have been doing it for many years and are benefitting from their long experience. (Personally I have given it up).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-19-2016, 12:47 AM
 
14,283 posts, read 24,068,890 times
Reputation: 20143
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
I am like you in that I just don't want to assume the worst for myself. I have a place with stairs and I will turn 72 next month. I have no more trouble negociating the stairs than I did at age 25. Despite having heard stories here on City-Data about people who bought their dream property way out in the country and then had to move when their health went bad, I say go for it if that's what you want to do. Do it with the realization that it may not be forever. Having to sell the place and move to town would not be the worst thing that could happen to you. Living in a place you don't like might be worse than that.

All of my elder relatives had no issue running up and down the steps when they were ONLY 72 years old ... but that was 10-20 years old.

Currently, my father is in a rehab facility for a few more weeks as he has to use the steps to get to a full bathroom and his bedroom.

My aunt also had no bathrooms on the 1st floor and had to move to a home when she could not easily make it up the steps several times a day each day.

Having to relocate later in retirement can be a real financial drain, especially in later retirement.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-19-2016, 01:02 AM
 
13,357 posts, read 25,643,221 times
Reputation: 20652
I am having my little retirement house built (770 sq.ft., small yard). It's in a small town that is 24 miles from the only real hospital for many miles. I will be car dependent. I am thinking of telling the contractor that, although it doesn't need to be handicapped-accessible, not to design in any problems.

My current house has an upstairs with nothing important there. I have a first-floor bed and full bath. When I was 57, I got a serious infected dog bite on my ankle. Couldn't walk without a cane for weeks, couldn't take a single step for one week. I was quite pleased with my insight about not having steps unless necessary! Anything can happen, and it needn't be age-related.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-19-2016, 01:03 AM
 
1 posts, read 541 times
Reputation: 15
thanks for sharing
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top