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Old 03-19-2016, 04:35 AM
 
Location: ☀️ SWFL ⛱ 🌴
2,441 posts, read 1,678,624 times
Reputation: 8726

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Quote:
Originally Posted by HappyTexan View Post
I've seen plenty of older folks on bicycles when I go to the coast in the summer.
Rockport and Port A.

They look like this though:

Top 10 Best Tricycles for Adults!
I see few older people on bikes in our NY village, just one comes to mind. I don't see older casual bike riders tooling around the village in the summer, just avid bikers in racing gear either coming down or going up the mountain.

In FL I see many older people on bikes in neighborhood streets and on trails all the time for casual rides. Being flat and having no hills makes it easier and safer to do. I see the trikes, but recumbent bikes in different styles are very popular, they are easier on the back. Many are riding hybrid bikes that have a shock on the front wheel to soften the effect on the arms/wrist and they have high handlebars to sit upright. The racing bikes are used more by the younger retirees, but not all are younger. I was surprised to see so many older folks on bikes when I first moved here.

I'm an early sixties retiree and ride my bike on short jaunts to the beach, over to the grandkid's or on a wide paved trail. I rode a bike everywhere as a kid. Riding with no hands and my feet on the handle bars like I used to back then isn't something I can do now. I have more sense and fear, darn it.

Last edited by jean_ji; 03-19-2016 at 05:08 AM..
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Old 03-19-2016, 05:56 AM
 
12,068 posts, read 5,161,506 times
Reputation: 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by matisse12 View Post
I was surprised in a recent thread when people were telling a 74 year old somewhat depressed woman to do bicycle riding.

It's just that very very very few 74 yr old women do bicycle riding....I live in one of the major bicycle riding cities of the U.S....I think maybe it's even declared as the #1 bicycle riding city.....and I NEVER see any older women past 70 bicycle riding and really not women in their 60's either.

Their are some men in their 60's and some men in their 70's who ride but it is not particularly common. For older women, it's a matter of balance, flexibility, and probably stamina.....plus safety concerns.....pretty rough on the bones & body to take a tumble to the ground on a bicycle....plus being surrounded by speeding bicycles even on nice recreational trails is a challenge.

I remember my mother, who rode a bicycle slowly around her neighborhood, with my father, did a bit of bicycling in a slow-paced way until she was 60 or 62, but then balance problems and osteoporosis took over.

I was wondering if the people who were recommending that the 74 yr old woman in the recent thread take up bicycle riding were anywhere close to that age....I'm sure there are exceptions who ride.....but I sure NEVER see any in this bicycle capital of the U.S. Plus it was pointed out in another thread that younger people do not know how it feels to be 65 or 70 or 75 or beyond.

That said, I'm 68 and have one of the cool funky european type new modern set of wheels that are smaller wheels & beautiful design, but I do not get very far on it. I just tool around a couple blocks. And last spring & summer & fall I didn't touch it.
Well just wanted to share that my grandmother in Italy rode a bike to market to do her daily food shopping almost everyday until she was in her mid to late 70s and she lived to 103.
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Old 03-19-2016, 06:31 AM
 
4,011 posts, read 3,231,535 times
Reputation: 13124
I built a one level house about 10 years ago, on acreage. Im about a half hour to several major medical facilities, so I see no reason at all that I cant stay here until they plow me under. Im 62. If I get to where the acreage is too much for me, Im sure I can rent it out. Lots of cattle farms around me. The size house I have wouldnt be any different than what Id buy in town, so I hope I can stay here forever. I know things change, and they may. If worse comes to worse, then Ill just sell and move to town.
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Old 03-19-2016, 07:20 AM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,953,845 times
Reputation: 6718
Quote:
Originally Posted by matisse12 View Post
I was surprised in a recent thread when people were telling a 74 year old somewhat depressed woman to do bicycle riding.

It's just that very very very few 74 yr old women do bicycle riding....I live in one of the major bicycle riding cities of the U.S....I think maybe it's even declared as the #1 bicycle riding city.....and I NEVER see any older women past 70 bicycle riding and really not women in their 60's either.

Their are some men in their 60's and some men in their 70's who ride but it is not particularly common. For older women, it's a matter of balance, flexibility, and probably stamina.....plus safety concerns.....pretty rough on the bones & body to take a tumble to the ground on a bicycle....plus being surrounded by speeding bicycles even on nice recreational trails is a challenge.

I remember my mother, who rode a bicycle slowly around her neighborhood, with my father, did a bit of bicycling in a slow-paced way until she was 60 or 62, but then balance problems and osteoporosis took over.

I was wondering if the people who were recommending that the 74 yr old woman in the recent thread take up bicycle riding were anywhere close to that age....I'm sure there are exceptions who ride.....but I sure NEVER see any in this bicycle capital of the U.S. Plus it was pointed out in another thread that younger people do not know how it feels to be 65 or 70 or 75 or beyond.

That said, I'm 68 and have one of the cool funky european type new modern set of wheels that are smaller wheels & beautiful design, but I do not get very far on it. I just tool around a couple blocks. And last spring & summer & fall I didn't touch it.
I'm 68 too. Used to ride my bike a lot. But now I have balance issues. Not anything bad. But enough to throw me off a little from time to time - and make it dangerous for me to ride a bike. I went to a bike store a few months ago to explore my options - and saw the kind of bikes that were in Happy Texan's message. Took a ride around. And - yuck. I felt like an idiot. I also thought the width of those bikes presented safety issues (both on sidewalks and in roadways). So 86 that idea. FWIW - my husband - 71 - can't ride a bike at all - and hasn't been able to do so for years as a result of his MS.

When it comes to stairs in a house - I say get a stair master. Or join a gym. If you're buying a house when you're in your 50's - who wants to be forced into a ridiculous living situation or - worse - a move because of a temporary or permanent mobility issue. A 60 year old friend of mine just returned from Utah. She had a major skiing accident and broke her hip. She'll be incapacitated for quite a while. If she didn't have a single story house - she'd be in deep doo-doo.

Think long and hard about taking on property management responsibilities. We have about 3/4 of an acre. We used to do most of the work on it ourselves. We can only do a fraction of the physical labor we used to be able to do - at least in terms of not walking around like a couple of cripples the next day. More important - we had fun taking care of the place when we first moved in. It was a novelty (we moved from a high rise condo). Well the novelty has worn off. FWIW - we have a landscape crew that does the work we can't do ourselves now. But it costs a fair number of $$$.

Finally - we live very close to a great hospital/medical facility. The Mayo Clinic. It didn't exist when we first moved here. IOW - "the mountain came to us" . But it is has certainly been a great convenient resource for us (and my 97 year old father) as we've gotten older. And require more "routine maintenance". Who wants to spend half a day or a day getting routine medical care (not to mention the possibility of having to deal with more serious things)? Robyn
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Old 03-19-2016, 07:48 AM
 
Location: I am right here.
4,915 posts, read 4,077,240 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by reneeh63 View Post

You can have your yard, but at SOME point you'll have to hire it out - again, you aren't self-motivated enough to go to the gym for exercise so that you're not tied long term to something that will be a problem later?
.
That's probably true. My dad's 93 year old neighbor still does all of his own yard work. As does my dad at 80. When it snows, it's my dad who is called on by other neighbors to plow their driveways. Oh, and both live in homes with basements and upstairs. Now, my dad's bedroom and bath are on the main level. However, to get into his house, he must climb 6 steps from the attached garage.

One of my neighbors is almost 70 and retired, and some working neighbors hire HIM for yard work, snow blowing, house painting.
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Old 03-19-2016, 08:16 AM
 
Location: Jamestown, NY
7,841 posts, read 7,342,827 times
Reputation: 13779
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vision67 View Post
If you are in your early 50s it's hard to imagine how you will be doing at 80. Thirty years is a long time.

So two moves might be fine.

But rest assured, in spite of how virile you now feel, if you live into your 80s you will appreciate having a single floor residence in town within a short drive to a medical facility.

Life is terminal. Better plan on that.
This. When I was in my early 50s, I planned on moving to the family farm out in the boonies when I retired. I'm 66 now and I'm retiring in 2 weeks.

I'm not moving out to the country because, realistically, it's a great place to live in the summer but not so great in the winter (20 miles from just about anywhere except the little town 4 miles away). The town changed, too, including losing some significant retail, its hospital and, worse, its veterinarian (I probably worry more about my crits than myself).

For now, I'm staying in my current home. I can use it as one floor living but I have a bedroom and sewing room upstairs. I also have a large lot filled with gardens plus I have a large garden at the old farm.

What I have been doing is checking out some of the nicer senior housing options in the area, not because I'm looking to move now, but in ten or fifteen years, I'll likely be wanting to do less maintenance and maybe have everything on one floor. Your health, your needs, even your mindset change over time.
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Old 03-19-2016, 08:38 AM
 
12,760 posts, read 14,110,686 times
Reputation: 34970
Quote:
Originally Posted by I love boots. View Post
....At what point is buying the house with stairs, maybe a little far from the hospital a bad idea? At what age should someone really be thinking about this stuff? If I do it how many good years do I have to live there?
A little over ten years ago I knew a woman who purchased a condo unit, formerly owned by an elderly couple, in which she planned to live out her retirement with her husband. There was a grab bar in the shower/tub, and she said she was going to take it out because she "....couldn't stand it!!!!" with lots of anger. Seems it made her feel like she was living in an old person's home. I suggested she just leave it and when she might need some day, it would be there. It was not exactly like having Godzilla in her shower. She had a hissy fit at the thought. She realized that the doors in the master bedroom and connected bath were wider than most doors, again...they had to be ripped out and replaced because they made her think of an old person.

In her early sixties she needed a grab bar in the shower and a bath chair to boot. And she was forever bitchin' about the fact that her wheelchair was hard to get through the doors and scraped off the finish.

You never know. But what you do know is that age, health and physical capability only go in one direction, even if you don't know how fast.

Some folks, like this lady, like the crap shoot approach. She lost, someone else might win. For awhile.
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Old 03-19-2016, 08:47 AM
 
2,446 posts, read 2,078,370 times
Reputation: 5706
About a year ago we found a house in the country and did some remodeling so theoretically we can live on main level. It is a ranch home with a finished basement that had the laundry in the basement. We converted one of the 3 bedrooms into a laundry room by having the washer and dryer in the closet. Can easily be converted back to usable bedroom if next owners need the bedroom.

We are both 55 years old but are thinking down the road. Hospital is 5 miles down the road and we both work about 12 miles from home so location fits.
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Old 03-19-2016, 09:06 AM
 
Location: Athol, Idaho
2,182 posts, read 1,170,055 times
Reputation: 3211
Quote:
Originally Posted by carnivalday View Post
I built a one level house about 10 years ago, on acreage. Im about a half hour to several major medical facilities, so I see no reason at all that I cant stay here until they plow me under. Im 62. If I get to where the acreage is too much for me, Im sure I can rent it out. Lots of cattle farms around me. The size house I have wouldnt be any different than what Id buy in town, so I hope I can stay here forever. I know things change, and they may. If worse comes to worse, then Ill just sell and move to town.
I'm thinking about renting out pasture if I end up buying it. I'm not in to keeping animals, but that seems like nice passive income and better tenants than most.
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Old 03-19-2016, 09:47 AM
 
662 posts, read 480,981 times
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I'm in my early 50's and my next house (which I hope will be my last...I'm sick of buying/selling RE) will have one-level living mostly because an elderly relative fell down her stairs 2x that we know of (I think she stopped telling us about her falls) and the last cost her her hip. She was healthy, but had occasional bouts of vertigo.

If I have a basement, I'll install some sort of lift for future reference. I'm not avoiding stairs because I think a day may come when I can't navigate them; I'm avoiding them because one little toe-bump could cause a fall that exceeds my height. For me, it's one thing to trip over my grandson's toys and hit the floor. It's entirely another to be wearing new shoes and misjudge the ratio of their size to the step's height. I don't want to take that kind of fall now or later.

Although, if I were already in a house with stairs, I could see why one would just stay. I'm moving, so it seems sensible to be stair-free since I never want to move again.

Lastly, I like to visit the country, but want to be near shopping and dining, so country living is out for me. To each their own, 'natch.

PS: gotta get out on my bike soon!
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