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Old 03-19-2016, 09:49 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
21,960 posts, read 14,435,970 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
I don't think you're wrong at all. Moving is expensive. Even if the only thing you're taking into account is the real estate commission when you're selling a place. But there are lots of other things as well. Like turning your new place into a place you like as much as your old place (whatever it costs). Robyn
Those of us who are older probably would have to pay for movers; you pay fees to apply for a mortgage, if you need one; you pay to have your new house inspected; you pay to fix up your old house before you sell; you pay to fix your new house up, or to add new furniture that fits; you pay commission when you sell.

We spent thousands moving cross country, and thousands more to have the new place painted and the floors sanded and re stained. We planned on doing this sort of thing once. Back in the early aughts I wanted to move, but we didn't feel we could commit to that then. I'm so glad we didn't, because it would have been costly, and then we would have moved ten or so years later.

Bad knees--I have them. I worked up and down on my feet for years. I didn't begin to have trouble until after I retired. Its been 10 years of gradually escalating pain. I suppose I will have to have surgery. I am not looking forward to that. A friend of mine who was in good shape, was not overweight, had very bad arthritic knees. Knee or hip pain plagues an awful lot of seniors. Sarah Susanka in the Not So Big House, recommends one floor homes for older people. This is not unusual. Senior housing is almost always on one level.
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Old 03-19-2016, 09:50 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
6,626 posts, read 3,690,289 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jasperhobbs View Post
I find the pros far outweigh the cons living in the country. Sure you have to plan a bit and can't get pizza delivery but the privacy is worth it.
Yeah...nothing really gets in the way if you are prepared for the changes. I have one close neighbor and a few within a short distance. Everyone respects privacy. I'm still learning... I had to replace my pump but it was old ->$$$. The sprinkler system died but it was pointless anyway...this is desert. Native plants work fine. The biggest challenge was the 1,500 gallon goldfish pond...a constant ongoing project. I only fell in once! Everything is different from city living and I like it that way.
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Old 03-20-2016, 05:07 AM
 
Location: Sunny Florida
7,136 posts, read 11,026,116 times
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You are in your early 50s and have a lot of living left to do. If you've always wanted a place in the country, and you're in good health, I think you should go for it so you don't have regrets later. I would say that before you make this leap consider how far you will have to travel for groceries, healthcare, gas, hardware, etc. because those things are a constant need. I'd also consider buying a place with a first floor master just in case you get to the point where stairs are an issue. You can use that space as a den, tv room, library, etc. in the short term, but when you can't do steps easily a first floor master makes your life a lot easier. The one thing you can depend on is things will change and often the changes come at you out of the blue, so it's good that you are thinking about this now. I wish you well and hope you find a home you love and will be sustainable.
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Old 03-20-2016, 06:32 AM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,953,845 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blondy View Post
...Even getting the garbage to a point to be picked up can be a major undertaking...
Having lived only in urban/suburban places - I was surprised to find that many people - including some in suburban places - don't have the kind of curbside garbage/recycling/yard trash pickups we have. Some people actually have to haul their garbage to area dumps/landfills. It's not something I'd care to do even if I were young - much less when I'm old. Robyn
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Old 03-20-2016, 07:39 AM
 
13,981 posts, read 7,452,675 times
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I ran through all of this 6 or 7 years ago at age 51. I wanted a small "age in place" house on a small lot with low cost of ownership. I wanted good local health care and world class within striking distance. I wanted high enough population density to have urban services like public transportation, Uber, grocery delivery, and senior-oriented community services like nurses, social workers, meals on wheels, and a senior center. I also wanted walkable to things.

There are a number of problems with moving to a very rural place. You're forever the outsider since most people in rural areas come from there and have known each other since birth. Everything in your life becomes an expedition. Grocery shopping. The dentist. The doctor. You''re 100% automobile-dependent.
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Old 03-20-2016, 07:41 AM
 
6,345 posts, read 5,079,035 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
Having lived only in urban/suburban places - I was surprised to find that many people - including some in suburban places - don't have the kind of curbside garbage/recycling/yard trash pickups we have. Some people actually have to haul their garbage to area dumps/landfills. It's not something I'd care to do even if I were young - much less when I'm old. Robyn
My sister does this weekly. She takes hers, goes to get her daughters, and then takes it to the one dumpster they all share. She's 67. Still in decent shape, but yea, I don't even like to roll mine to the curb! I do bring it in as soon as the truck comes by because I hate seeing it out there.
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Old 03-20-2016, 07:51 AM
 
Location: Floyd Co, VA
3,416 posts, read 5,144,825 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zugor View Post

My first dozen years here I mowed the front, side and back yard areas with a walk behind mower but it was small and took a long time so at age 61 I did break down and buy a ride on with a 42" deck and that task goes much faster now.
Oops - I meant my first HALF dozen years.
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Old 03-20-2016, 07:52 AM
 
13,981 posts, read 7,452,675 times
Reputation: 25550
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
Having lived only in urban/suburban places - I was surprised to find that many people - including some in suburban places - don't have the kind of curbside garbage/recycling/yard trash pickups we have. Some people actually have to haul their garbage to area dumps/landfills. It's not something I'd care to do even if I were young - much less when I'm old. Robyn
I used to live in a gold-plated inner Boston suburb. No curbside pickup. The "transfer station" was a social center and communication point in the town since everyone was there weekly. I grew up with the weekly run to "the dump" so I don't find it at all unusual.

I now have town curbside trash & recycling pickup but I have to use $1.00/bag town trash bags. I think it's a good system because the town takes recycling for free. If you recycle and compost, you don't end up putting much in the landfill. Unless I have something like lobster carcasses, I can easily go a month on a kitchen trash bag.
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Old 03-20-2016, 08:07 AM
 
Location: Central IL
15,253 posts, read 8,564,754 times
Reputation: 35698
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post
I used to live in a gold-plated inner Boston suburb. No curbside pickup. The "transfer station" was a social center and communication point in the town since everyone was there weekly. I grew up with the weekly run to "the dump" so I don't find it at all unusual.

I now have town curbside trash & recycling pickup but I have to use $1.00/bag town trash bags. I think it's a good system because the town takes recycling for free. If you recycle and compost, you don't end up putting much in the landfill. Unless I have something like lobster carcasses, I can easily go a month on a kitchen trash bag.

That's fantastic - encouraging you to recycle as well as to eat less processed food and all kinds of healthy stuff instead! That's like a win-win-win kind of deal.
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Old 03-20-2016, 08:37 AM
 
Location: Chicago area
14,441 posts, read 7,945,283 times
Reputation: 53584
I hear ya about not wanting stairs. Our friends just sold their two flat and they are looking for a ranch with no stairs. They're still in their middle fifties. Our house has four stories and three sets of stairs inside and two sets of stairs outside. I too believe that stairs are a good thing and if I want to be like those sexy seniors who are in their eighties and nineties and still roller skating, then I had better keep on doing those stairs.....for a long long time.

No boring vanilla ranches for me. If I get too old to do stairs then I'll buy one of those elevator thingies that take you up the stairs.
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