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Old 03-25-2016, 07:06 AM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,925,663 times
Reputation: 6716

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Quote:
Originally Posted by creeksitter View Post
Here's the deal. Your heat pump probably needed to be serviced. If the auxiliary heat was undersized the solution is to go to the dollar store and buy a couple of radiator heaters - plug them in on their lowest setting. After a couple of hours the rooms will warm up.

You won't get to go back to Florida and boo hoo about being sooo cold in the upper south, though. Too bad, so sad, there goes another bragging opportunity.
Wasn't my heat pump. It was my late inlaws'. At least they got lucky that their pipes didn't burst (many in the area did). It was an extremely cold winter weather event. Perhaps the storm of the century. OTOH - one thing I can say about the area after dozens of trips there (often for Christmas) is there are ice storms on a somewhat regular basis. They make for terrifying driving (we always tried to avoid driving in them - but sometimes it was unavoidable). And result in power losses. I tend to doubt they hit every year - but they don't seem to be uncommon:

Blizzard knocks out power to hundreds of thousands along East Coast

Robyn
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Old 03-25-2016, 07:12 AM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,925,663 times
Reputation: 6716
Quote:
Originally Posted by creeksitter View Post
like Jlawrence said, this is a very weird statement. What point are you trying to make? It just feels like you take every opportunity to brag that you are next door to Mayo clinic and everyone else is 2nd class citizens.

I can vouch that 2 yrs ago Park West hospital brought back my father from the dead (OK technically it was the medics and someone from the Drs office next to his physical therapy). Anyway Park West bypassed him and stitched him up, he's still with us 2 yrs later.

Jlawrence is right that 99% of medical needs are handled right in town. Burn victims go to Erlanger in Chattanooga. It is rare to hear of someone going to Duke or Vanderbilt, though it happens.
You live in Knoxville - a metro area with a population that is approaching 1 million people. And I would expect it to have some decent medical facilities. I am talking basically about seniors who are thinking about relocating well outside a metro area. Where medical facilities can be inferior or almost non-existent or a long drive away. Robyn
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Old 03-25-2016, 08:00 AM
 
365 posts, read 305,971 times
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I think for most retirees in Tennessee the Hall tax is not a significant factor and probably most are exempt. But keep posting these anti-Tennessee threads ... it helps keep the riffraff crowds away
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Old 03-25-2016, 08:31 AM
 
Location: Wasilla, AK
7,240 posts, read 4,132,331 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JRR View Post
We totally agree with you on your reasons for moving to Tennessee, especially the people we have met there. During our visits to Cookeville, we just started up conversations with people. Like the elderly gentleman in bib overalls at the IGA store. I nodded and said hello and he said hello and I remarked about the big thunderstorm the previous night and that led to about a fifteen minute conversation about Cookeville (where he had lived all his life). He also pointed me toward a nice piece of land to look at.

As we talked with people in restaurants, stores, in the park, etc, we met some from Florida, Texas, California and many who were born and raised there. Can't say that I got negative feelings from any of them. I know that everyone won't like us and we won't like everyone, but I think we are going to fit in just fine.

Like you the cost of living is a factor, but not the only factor. For us, the Hall Tax doesn't figure in at all (us not being in the 1%).
My wife's son lives right down the road in Crossville. He loves it there. I can see my Arizona house going on the market so we can winter there instead and the wife can see her out of state granddaughter half the year.
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Old 03-25-2016, 08:33 AM
 
13,880 posts, read 7,391,112 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
You live in Knoxville - a metro area with a population that is approaching 1 million people. And I would expect it to have some decent medical facilities. I am talking basically about seniors who are thinking about relocating well outside a metro area. Where medical facilities can be inferior or almost non-existent or a long drive away. Robyn
That was on my list when choosing a retirement location. I'm 30 minutes by ambulance from a level 1 trauma center and 60-ish miles from all the world class specialists in Boston.

Tennessee has Level 1 trauma centers in the major cities. Memphis, Nashville, Chattanooga, Knoxville, and a couple in far eastern Tennessee. That's great coverage compared to many parts of the country. I'm too much of a skiing & salt water/ocean person to ever consider Tennessee but it's a pretty good option if you're trying to stretch your fixed income and retirement savings.

There are big chunks of the country where access to top tier health care is an issue. If you're in the Mountain Time Zone, you'd better be pretty close to Denver, Salt Lake City, or Albuquerque (or El Paso). In the Pac-NW, it's the same with Seattle & Portland. I don't plan to have some disease that requires a top specialist and a top facility but 30 minutes from a Level 1 Trauma Center might mean the difference between being a vegetable/dead and full recovery for some things.
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Old 03-25-2016, 08:53 AM
 
Location: Loudon, TN
5,769 posts, read 4,830,089 times
Reputation: 19395
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
When we encountered the heat pump system that couldn't keep up - the temperatures were in the low teens or single digits at night and the low 20's during the day. It was - admittedly - some very off the charts weather when it comes to central NC and other parts of the SE.

Christmas Coastal Snowstorm: December 22-24, 1989

I don't have a clue what normal low winter temperatures are anywhere in Tennessee (suspect a lot depends on elevation). If temperatures like this are a once in a lifetime event (in Tennessee or elsewhere) - I'd probably just grin and bear it. If they're normal on a regular basis - even for a few days - even every couple of years - I would plan for them when designing an appropriate HVAC system.

At what temperatures do you think heat pumps become insufficient/ineffective? Note that we have a heat pump with the electric coils you mentioned. It has been ok for everything we've had in the last 20 years (at worst - high 20's for a few hours in the late night/early morning for a few days during a cold winter - this last winter was a warm one). Except for the electric bill (we can spend more to heat our house in a cold winter month than to cool it in August).

I've never seen a propane HVAC system here. Some people have them for stoves - perhaps a hot water heater - but not an HVAC system. Was never interested in putting a propane tank in the ground (which is what our HOA requires). Apart from everything else - when we get tropical storms with lots of rain that raises the already pretty high water table - they pop out of the ground. Is your tank in ground or above ground? Natural gas lines would be nice. But very few places in the SE that I've seen have it. Robyn
The temperature that heat pumps become relatively ineffective is about 36-40 degrees. Below that temp the lockout switch should lock out the compressor (outdoor unit) and it should run solely on the back up heat system (electric or gas). I suspect one reason that you were so cold is that the system was not designed for temperatures that cold and was just not able to keep up with the heat loss in the house. I would think that most homes in Florida are not designed for cold temps and may have single pane windows or other design features that cause excessive heat loss in weather that cold. We do have temps here in the Tennessee river valley down to the low teens and a rare single digit night every once in a while, but night time temps in the 30's are common for about 2 months a year. We had a propane furnace in CA, and our system here is dual-fuel, as I mentioned before. We have an underground tank, but we don't have a high water table and the UG tank is great. So much better than the huge unattractive tank we had in CA. Our area has no access to natural gas, so it's heat pumps or propane, or a combination as we have. Even a radiant system will need to operate on either electric or gas to heat the circulating water. I would look into the operating cost of such a system before investing in it.
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Old 03-25-2016, 09:20 AM
 
Location: Loudon, TN
5,769 posts, read 4,830,089 times
Reputation: 19395
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post
That was on my list when choosing a retirement location. I'm 30 minutes by ambulance from a level 1 trauma center and 60-ish miles from all the world class specialists in Boston.

Tennessee has Level 1 trauma centers in the major cities. Memphis, Nashville, Chattanooga, Knoxville, and a couple in far eastern Tennessee. That's great coverage compared to many parts of the country. I'm too much of a skiing & salt water/ocean person to ever consider Tennessee but it's a pretty good option if you're trying to stretch your fixed income and retirement savings.

There are big chunks of the country where access to top tier health care is an issue. If you're in the Mountain Time Zone, you'd better be pretty close to Denver, Salt Lake City, or Albuquerque (or El Paso). In the Pac-NW, it's the same with Seattle & Portland. I don't plan to have some disease that requires a top specialist and a top facility but 30 minutes from a Level 1 Trauma Center might mean the difference between being a vegetable/dead and full recovery for some things.
Who does?? Nobody plans on getting a rare or difficult disease, but sh*t happens. At any rate, there are great doctors here, and so far we have been blessed to have a great PCP who is so very thorough and reacts quickly to our concerns without any condescension. We have access to the university medical center 35 minutes away and a couple of wonderful hospitals that have excellent ratings for cardiac care should that become an issue. Most people don't ever need the Mayo clinic and I wouldn't base my decision on that either, but being within an hour of a "good" hospital is a reasonable expectation in retirement.
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Old 03-25-2016, 09:31 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,572 posts, read 17,544,804 times
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When moving to any state (except perhaps FL, where it's so retiree and transplant heavy anyway), moving to some retirement enclave filled with transplants doesn't give you anywhere near an accurate representation of how the locals live, and what normal lifestyles in your area are.

I looked at some homes in Tellico Village this morning and they are absolutely gorgeous. There are a few homes for under $250,000, but some need updating (nothing major), with most of the new construction at $300,000+. There are Tennesseans who can afford that, but that's way beyond the reach of the average local family, much less someone heading into retirement and ideally looking to reduce expenses. Keep in mind that in my hometown, median household income is just about $35,000.

This is a reasonably priced, new home in Tellico Village, and it's still over $250,000. Most of the homes are well over $300,000. If you're coming from MA/CA/CT/NY/Chicago, etc., that's probably going to seem like a bargain to you. To locals making $30k-$40k in professional roles, it's kind of like looking at how a professional athlete lives - you can dream about it, but know you'll never get there.

228 Gadusi Way, Loudon, TN For Sale | Trulia.com

These are all very beautiful homes, and way nicer than what you'll find in most of the east TN housing market. Take a look at these two homes that are located within two miles of where I grew up.

Kingsport, TN Real Estate & Homes for Sale | Trulia

Compare this home to the one in Tellico Village. This home is not even $40,000 less, in an area with far fewer amenities, and appears dated and bland compared to the new one.

Look at this 1970s throwback for $190,000. It's beyond ugly. IMO, the house will be lucky to get half of what is being asked for it.

5404 Memorial Boulevard, Kingsport, TN For Sale | Trulia.com

The point is someone in one of these nice enclaves, going to the posh golf courses and marinas, not dependent upon the local labor market, and largely unaware of the problems outside the nice areas, isn't really living a lifestyle to where they're "immersed in the area."
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Old 03-25-2016, 10:01 AM
 
365 posts, read 305,971 times
Reputation: 443
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheShadow View Post
The temperature that heat pumps become relatively ineffective is about 36-40 degrees. Below that temp the lockout switch should lock out the compressor (outdoor unit) and it should run solely on the back up heat system (electric or gas). I suspect one reason that you were so cold is that the system was not designed for temperatures that cold and was just not able to keep up with the heat loss in the house. I would think that most homes in Florida are not designed for cold temps and may have single pane windows or other design features that cause excessive heat loss in weather that cold. We do have temps here in the Tennessee river valley down to the low teens and a rare single digit night every once in a while, but night time temps in the 30's are common for about 2 months a year. We had a propane furnace in CA, and our system here is dual-fuel, as I mentioned before. We have an underground tank, but we don't have a high water table and the UG tank is great. So much better than the huge unattractive tank we had in CA. Our area has no access to natural gas, so it's heat pumps or propane, or a combination as we have. Even a radiant system will need to operate on either electric or gas to heat the circulating water. I would look into the operating cost of such a system before investing in it.
A high efficiency wood burning stove will keep the house warm on those too cold for heat pump days ... and keep the electric bill from skyrocketing
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Old 03-25-2016, 10:11 AM
 
Location: Loudon, TN
5,769 posts, read 4,830,089 times
Reputation: 19395
It's true that TV is an enclave of mostly transplants. Guilty as charged. And homes here are nice due to the fact that the HOA has requirements, . But we are far from the only high end homes in the Knoxville area. Look at the homes in Farragut and many other beautiful neighborhoods, and on acreages all over the metro area. There are hundreds of near million dollar homes all over the area listed in the real estate ads every week. (Yes I still get the newspaper, dinosaur that I am). There are homes in TV that sale for much less than $300k, and many that are listed for much more.

While it's true that I do not live in "the holler", it does not mean that I'm blind or ignorant of the problems of those living in poverty. I didn't get all the way to retirement by not being able to see and understand what is happening around me. But I also don't feel it's fair to paint all of eastern TN with the ugly, single-wide paintbrush. There are drug/crime problems in the areas outside of the metropolitan areas and they are the same problems that exist in most other states of the country. Since this is a retirement forum, I do enjoy posting about the wonderful retirement community I have found, and what makes it a good place to retire to. Many others move to TN for retirement and do not live in retirement-specific communities. It's a wonderful place to retire, and everyone should always visit, and even live for a while, in the areas they are considering moving to. I personally support as many local businesses and visit as many local communities as I can. We volunteer for organizations that provide assistance to many locals and enjoy spending as much time in the surrounding communities as possible. I don't have to live in poverty (and I did for the first 25 years of my life) to understand. You have zero knowledge of how immersed we are in our area.
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