U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-29-2016, 07:19 AM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,927,825 times
Reputation: 6716

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by yourown2feet View Post
I learned to paint when I was 14, and my father made me paint the entire house exterior (it was a 1950's one-story house, with corrugated wood shingle exterior). Since then, I've never lived in a house that required exterior paint, but I've painted many interior rooms. Ceilings are the worst, because you have to reach over your head. But walls are not nearly as hard, if you are methodical about taping and cutting-in. "Methodical" is really the watchword for painting, I've found.

To avoid paint drips, I learned 2 things through trial-and-error:

1) If the project will take more than one day, thoroughly clean and dry your brushes, rollers, etc. Even a little residual dampness will thin the paint and make it more prone to dripping.

2) Inspect for drips before the paint has a chance to dry. They are easy to fix while the paint is damp. After partly painting a wall, inspect every inch for drips with a bare-bulb lamp (100-watt equivalent bulb).

Good luck! You can do this.
I haven't painted rooms since I was in my 20's (although I still paint other things - like the railings I mentioned). I think drips are inevitable. So - the best approach IMO is to move all the furniture into the middle of the room. And cover everything that could be dripped on (including floors) with drop cloths.

When it comes to things like railings - I am using spray paint. Where it is possible to make a huge mess very quickly. So I have a couple of rules. First - don't work outside if there is the slightest hint of wind. Second - tape and cover everything that could wind up being "painted" unintentionally. I also use "backboards" if necessary. In all honesty - I think jobs like this are 95%+ prep (sanding and taping and covering and the like) - and 5% painting. It is tedious - but not difficult work for the most part.

When using spray paint - I think this accessory is essential:

Rust-Oleum Stops Rust High Performance Comfort Spray Grip Accessory-241526 - The Home Depot

Robyn
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-29-2016, 08:06 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,053 posts, read 54,552,165 times
Reputation: 66393
@Robyn - good advice about organization. I sort of have a list. Things I can do myself, then the list of fixes for which I'll need the handyman. Then some medium projects like replacing closet doors. Then there are a few big ticket items, like a new vanity/cabinet/light fixture for the bathroom and new flooring that are for further on down the road.

As I said, I bought this place 5 years ago and did the immediate big-ticket things--new HVAC and windows, which were almost to "urgent" status--but I really had no time to do a lot of other stuff because of the long hours and long commute of my job. When you get up at 5, leave the house at 6, and don't get home until after 7, house maintenance and cleaning is limited to the bare essentials. Now I'm looking not only at fixes but cleaning projects that haven't been done in five years--cleaning closets, straightening/organizing bookshelves, etc.

A list by priority will be helpful.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-29-2016, 09:57 AM
 
Location: Its easy to be a perfectionist when someone else is doing all the work.
2,232 posts, read 5,462,289 times
Reputation: 4088
Lots of good answers so I wont repeat them all. I prefer metal toggles too. I agree on the studs is a lot better though. You tube and the hardware store guys have been a big help to me also. One of my last projects was a sump pump in my cellar. All I had to do was dig the hole.

Im pretty handy. I did quite a bit of renovations in my youth. But Im getting older now at 66 so I don't do as much as I used to. Also Ive been here for a while. I prefer to hire out the heavy lifting stuff now. IMO its always best to read up on your project first so that you know how it should be done. If you know some of the lingo theyre less likely to screw it up.

I clean houses part time so that I can pay people to do what I don't want to do. I do what Im good at so I can pay them to do what they are good at. Maybe you could get a part time job so that you could pay a handy person.

Just a thought. Since youre on the condo board maybe you could suggest that they line up a handy person for everyone to use. Or maybe some of the retired guys living there might like to do small jobs to keep busy or for extra income. Do you have a bulletin board for postings. Maybe you could have an exchange? For example my neighbor did some work for me and I cleaned their house top to bottom.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-29-2016, 10:16 AM
 
406 posts, read 370,185 times
Reputation: 822
I haven't taken the time to read through the entire thread, but just wanted to mention that "sliders" work well for moving furniture around a room. They come in several sizes. There are ones big enough to fit under each leg of your bed and then you can easily move your bed around the room, as needed, when painting. That way you won't hurt yourself moving a heavy mattress and box spring. I'm a 63 year old female and I'm not very big, or strong and this works really well for me. I move furniture all over the house this way. Very easy and much safer.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-29-2016, 12:02 PM
 
6,310 posts, read 5,053,602 times
Reputation: 12815
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cecilia_Rose View Post
Lots of good answers so I wont repeat them all. I prefer metal toggles too. I agree on the studs is a lot better though. You tube and the hardware store guys have been a big help to me also. One of my last projects was a sump pump in my cellar. All I had to do was dig the hole.

Im pretty handy. I did quite a bit of renovations in my youth. But Im getting older now at 66 so I don't do as much as I used to. Also Ive been here for a while. I prefer to hire out the heavy lifting stuff now. IMO its always best to read up on your project first so that you know how it should be done. If you know some of the lingo theyre less likely to screw it up.

I clean houses part time so that I can pay people to do what I don't want to do. I do what Im good at so I can pay them to do what they are good at. Maybe you could get a part time job so that you could pay a handy person.

Just a thought. Since youre on the condo board maybe you could suggest that they line up a handy person for everyone to use. Or maybe some of the retired guys living there might like to do small jobs to keep busy or for extra income. Do you have a bulletin board for postings. Maybe you could have an exchange? For example my neighbor did some work for me and I cleaned their house top to bottom.
Good advice to remember that there are things you are good at and things others are good at.

And yes, the condo board could look into having a recommended list of repair people. Who doesn't need help every now and then.

Exchanging services is good too.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-29-2016, 01:56 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,053 posts, read 54,552,165 times
Reputation: 66393
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cecilia_Rose View Post
Lots of good answers so I wont repeat them all. I prefer metal toggles too. I agree on the studs is a lot better though. You tube and the hardware store guys have been a big help to me also. One of my last projects was a sump pump in my cellar. All I had to do was dig the hole.

Im pretty handy. I did quite a bit of renovations in my youth. But Im getting older now at 66 so I don't do as much as I used to. Also Ive been here for a while. I prefer to hire out the heavy lifting stuff now. IMO its always best to read up on your project first so that you know how it should be done. If you know some of the lingo theyre less likely to screw it up.

I clean houses part time so that I can pay people to do what I don't want to do. I do what Im good at so I can pay them to do what they are good at. Maybe you could get a part time job so that you could pay a handy person.

Just a thought. Since youre on the condo board maybe you could suggest that they line up a handy person for everyone to use. Or maybe some of the retired guys living there might like to do small jobs to keep busy or for extra income. Do you have a bulletin board for postings. Maybe you could have an exchange? For example my neighbor did some work for me and I cleaned their house top to bottom.
We have a meeting in April. I am going to ask our management company if having a handyman type list is something she's ever heard of. Of course, by virtue of the fact that it's a condominium, such a list for walls-in work is outside of the association's realm. We have a maintenance contractor for association/common area work, but I believe that contractually they are not permitted to do work for individual owners. Still, we could maybe send out letters to see who might be interested in working out a deal with someone, as individual owners. Hmmm.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-29-2016, 02:24 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,927,825 times
Reputation: 6716
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
@Robyn - good advice about organization. I sort of have a list. Things I can do myself, then the list of fixes for which I'll need the handyman. Then some medium projects like replacing closet doors. Then there are a few big ticket items, like a new vanity/cabinet/light fixture for the bathroom and new flooring that are for further on down the road.

As I said, I bought this place 5 years ago and did the immediate big-ticket things--new HVAC and windows, which were almost to "urgent" status--but I really had no time to do a lot of other stuff because of the long hours and long commute of my job. When you get up at 5, leave the house at 6, and don't get home until after 7, house maintenance and cleaning is limited to the bare essentials. Now I'm looking not only at fixes but cleaning projects that haven't been done in five years--cleaning closets, straightening/organizing bookshelves, etc.

A list by priority will be helpful.
Equally important - don't - for example - waste time painting the bathroom if you plan to put in a new vanity/fixtures (unless that project is a long way in the future). You'll just wind up having to paint/do drywall repair again. Ditto with things like painting areas where you're replacing closet doors (they'll probably have to be painted - and - by the time you have to paint them - the "new paint" surrounding them will probably not be the same color - unless the doors are a totally different color than the walls).

BTW - just curious - why are you replacing closet doors? Note that when we did our big "refresh" - one thing I did was replace old electrical switch/outlet covers that had discolored over the years with new ones. Inexpensive and easy DIY job (even for me ). Really made everything look new and fresh.

So think things through. What should be first - second - etc. If I couldn't do everything at once - I would - given what you've said - probably deal with the closet doors first. Then paint. Then put in new floors. Save the bathroom for last (in its entirety) - because it's an expensive part of the plan. And a bathroom is usually a self-contained separate room. You might approach things differently - but I think you get the general idea. You want to organize things so you don't have the sense that you're working on the same part of the place again and again and again. You want to finish parts of the overall project. Stand back - and see that this room or the other room is FINISHED DONE. Robyn

P.S. Cleaning and organizing closets and kitchen cabinets - and straightening/organizing bookshelves is relatively easy and cathartic. If you moved when you were working - you probably moved a lot of stuff that you wouldn't have moved if you had more time on your hands to sort through things before the move. I "declutter" on a regular basis (especially when it comes to parts of the house that my husband uses more than I do - like the garage!).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-29-2016, 02:28 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,053 posts, read 54,552,165 times
Reputation: 66393
For the person who felt the need to send a snotty anonymous rep comment about my "highfalutin" job and how I should therefore have the ability to pay people to do work for me--FYI, it was a public sector job for a transportation agency. We got great health benefits and a defined pension plan, but we don't get rich. I went to secretarial school and worked my way into management. Went to night school for a while, but never got to finish my degree. I made an OK living despite no college and was able to raise my daughter with minor, sporadic child support and get HER through college.

To make assumptions and judgments based on one's limited knowledge and then send nasty notes is pretty childish. High school immaturity never ends--even, apparently, among the retiree community.

For the rest of you who responded with commiseration and/or great suggestions, thank you all so much! I feel much better now than I did when I wrote the first post!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-29-2016, 02:34 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,927,825 times
Reputation: 6716
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
We have a meeting in April. I am going to ask our management company if having a handyman type list is something she's ever heard of. Of course, by virtue of the fact that it's a condominium, such a list for walls-in work is outside of the association's realm. We have a maintenance contractor for association/common area work, but I believe that contractually they are not permitted to do work for individual owners. Still, we could maybe send out letters to see who might be interested in working out a deal with someone, as individual owners. Hmmm.
We lived in 2 high rise condos before we built our house (big ones - 350 and 500 units). And had "in house" maintenance that both the association and the owners used (the owners had to pay for whatever services they wanted that weren't part of the "condo maintenance").

I can't see any legal impediment in terms of a contractor who works for an association working for owners too. But there may be practical impediments (e.g., homeowners' jobs are too small).

Most management companies don't want to put together "recommended" lists these days. For anything. Because - if something goes wrong - they fear they might be liable for a bad recommendation. Our HOA has a "for owners" website where homeowners can recommend outfits they have used and liked. "Word of mouth". Robyn
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-29-2016, 02:44 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,053 posts, read 54,552,165 times
Reputation: 66393
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
Equally important - don't - for example - waste time painting the bathroom if you plan to put in a new vanity/fixtures (unless that project is a long way in the future). You'll just wind up having to paint/do drywall repair again. Ditto with things like painting areas where you're replacing closet doors (they'll probably have to be painted - and - by the time you have to paint them - the "new paint" surrounding them will probably not be the same color - unless the doors are a totally different color than the walls).

BTW - just curious - why are you replacing closet doors? Note that when we did our big "refresh" - one thing I did was replace old electrical switch/outlet covers that had discolored over the years with new ones. Inexpensive and easy DIY job (even for me ). Really made everything look new and fresh.

So think things through. What should be first - second - etc. If I couldn't do everything at once - I would - given what you've said - probably deal with the closet doors first. Then paint. Then put in new floors. Save the bathroom for last (in its entirety) - because it's an expensive part of the plan. And a bathroom is usually a self-contained separate room. You might approach things differently - but I think you get the general idea. You want to organize things so you don't have the sense that you're working on the same part of the place again and again and again. You want to finish parts of the overall project. Stand back - and see that this room or the other room is FINISHED DONE. Robyn

P.S. Cleaning and organizing closets and kitchen cabinets - and straightening/organizing bookshelves is relatively easy and cathartic. If you moved when you were working - you probably moved a lot of stuff that you wouldn't have moved if you had more time on your hands to sort through things before the move. I "declutter" on a regular basis (especially when it comes to parts of the house that my husband uses more than I do - like the garage!).
From July 2009 to July 2010 I moved three times! I did get to deciutter quite a bit because I moved the first time from a 3 BR house to an apartment, then another apartment, then the condo, but more stuff has seeped in. I was just thinking about that. Where did this stuff come from???? Then I remembered that some of it were my daughter's things that she used to keep at her dad's, and when HE moved, she brought it here. Then she had an apartment with a roommate after college, but after a year she went to live in China, so she brought home more stuff before she went, especially boxes of books she wants to keep re her language and cultural studies.

So guess what? I'm going to visit her for a couple of days (in another state). She has an apartment with two other girls now. And I'm taking her books. And her tent and her sleeping bag (music festivals...)

I'm also putting a bag together with clothing and household items that a veterans organization picks up.

I LOVE getting rid of things!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top