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Old 03-29-2016, 12:00 AM
 
Location: Tucson/Nogales
17,383 posts, read 21,228,976 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tulippsy View Post


For retirees in particular, I think townhouses aren't a good idea. You can still experience noise through shared walls in a townhouse and stairs are not the smartest idea for an aging buyer. And condos have too much shared risk. I never want anything to do with a condo Board again.

I think manufactured home parks could be the wave of the future for boomer retirees like myself who retired sooner than they planned and may not have the assets to downsize into a stick built home and don't need assisted living.
Noise! There you are in your mobile home, and next door you have a very stubborn individual who refuses to buy hearing aids, and he plays his stereo and TV loud enough to where you can hear him next door as you're trying to sleep at night!

For townhouses, check the construction first! I live in one, and every unit here is separated by 2 story cinder-block walls to keep it ultra quiet!

As for high rise condo's, I would only live in older 50's/60's/70's type condo buildings, as way back then, any number of these condo buildings had poured concrete walls between the units, a style that went away some time ago.

I asked a friend one time, why he bought into an older 60's-built condo building in downtown Minneapolis. Why? Back then, 12 inches of concrete for flooring, poured concrete walls, so you can play the piano at 3am without disturbing anyone!

Most of the construction today?
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Old 03-29-2016, 12:40 AM
 
Location: In a little house on the prairie - literally
10,202 posts, read 6,086,833 times
Reputation: 4527
Quote:
Originally Posted by tijlover View Post
I was interested in a mobile-home co-op in Tucson, but not just anyone can buy in there, as you need to be approved by the Board of Directors, which can discriminate for any reason, as they're above discrimination laws. At this co-op a background check is made, not just on the owner, but anyone else that will be living with you.

I have a Green-card Mexican who's been living with me for 15 years (rents a room from me and has now become a "family member") and I'm concerned that, if I proceed with buying a home there, they may not allow him to live there. It's pretty much an all-white community, and for all I know, they may not want a Mexican living in their community, as there's some segregation issues in Tucson.

And, if you choose to sell, your buyers must also be approved by the Board of Directors, which could delay the sale of your home.

I was also looking at some condo co-ops in Tucson, facing the same issues as well, and small wonder there's always a slew of units for sale in these complexes, as, who knows, the Board of Directors may be very, very picky about who they wish to reside there.

Sheesh! I read the book 740 Park Avenue, on the most expensive co-op in Manhattan, where you need $100 million in assets just to be considered as an owner there, and Barbra Streisand once was desiring to buy a unit there, and even with more than $100 million in assets, they rejected her! Yes, co-ops can accept/reject anyone they please, and no explanation for their rejection is needed!
I think this is SOP in many condos. I had to go through that, and in fact, I appreciate it. It is a good screening mechanism to keep out edgy owners. Perfect? No, but I support it.
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Old 03-29-2016, 04:13 AM
 
7,980 posts, read 3,461,269 times
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I wouldn't bother with a mobile home in Florida. I've seen many mobile home parks sell to big developers. Where are you going to move it? At what cost? Not to mention the obvious problem with hurricanes on the East coast.
I would feel better with a permanent structure that could withstand a storm. Riviera Beach isn't a particularly great location either. Sorry!
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Old 03-29-2016, 04:16 AM
 
71,511 posts, read 71,694,121 times
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there is just something wrong when you have a home that is mobile and a car on the front lawn that isn't .
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Old 03-29-2016, 05:02 AM
 
Location: NC Piedmont
3,911 posts, read 2,876,920 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
there is just something wrong when you have a home that is mobile and a car on the front lawn that isn't .
This thread is more about the nicer parks that people overlook when they joke about stereotypes like that. Shortly after we got married, we sold a townhouse in preparation for a big move and had to find a short term rental. My in laws knew the managers of a local community and we were able to rent there until we moved. They normally didn't do short term; it was a nice middle class neighborhood with mostly working folks that didn't have a lot of money.
I really think an RV park for some snow bird trips is more likely for me than a regular park, but I don't look down my nose at them.
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Old 03-29-2016, 07:41 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
10,281 posts, read 4,859,674 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M3 Mitch View Post
To me, even though the land is in a co-op, I would always worry about not having ownership of the land itself. Renting a lot in a private park is a recipe for disaster eventually - most parks eventually sell out to someone who wants to build condos or such - and if you have a trailer in there, tough, your problem to find a new place to park it.

That said, for someone with limited finances, this might be attractive.

In general Florida weather is great except for the hurricanes.

And the endless heat and humidity but I guess some people like that. Me, not so much.
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Old 03-29-2016, 07:44 AM
 
6,306 posts, read 5,049,308 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chiluvr1228 View Post
And the endless heat and humidity but I guess some people like that. Me, not so much.
I spent a few months at Tyndall AFB and was shocked at all the rusty metal doors for example. And they were not that old. The base is right on the beach.

I do not recall seeing that type of thing at the Texas beaches. Maybe a different type of humidity - lol.
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Old 03-29-2016, 08:26 AM
 
Location: ☀️ SWFL ⛱ 🌴
2,428 posts, read 1,665,603 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chiluvr1228 View Post
And the endless heat and humidity but I guess some people like that. Me, not so much.
You are not in a good place if you don't tolerate heat and humidity. I took the dog for a brisk two mile walk around sunset last night. Walking into the coastal breeze it felt great, on the return with the wind not in my face, I was drenched by the time I reached home again. I refer to it as my purification process.
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Old 03-29-2016, 08:55 AM
 
Location: In a little house on the prairie - literally
10,202 posts, read 6,086,833 times
Reputation: 4527
Quote:
Originally Posted by jean_ji View Post
You are not in a good place if you don't tolerate heat and humidity. I took the dog for a brisk two mile walk around sunset last night. Walking into the coastal breeze it felt great, on the return with the wind not in my face, I was drenched by the time I reached home again. I refer to it as my purification process.
Yikes, that sounds like something a 'religion' in Clearwater would push.
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Old 03-29-2016, 09:04 AM
 
406 posts, read 370,042 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FloridaHappy View Post
We own two rental houses in a 55+ community in Ocala, FL. We own the lots they sit on and they're both stick-built homes. Current value is about $60K on each of them. There are houses in there selling for between $40K and $70K, depending on how much remodeling has been done. The amenity fee is $105 a month and includes basic cable, trash and garbage pickup, and use of all amenities including two pools, hot tubs, community centers, exercise room, pool tables, a library, shuffleboard, tennis, pickle ball, etc.


As a landlord, I don't get a homeowner exemption and the taxes run about $900 a year on each house. Florida has a $50K homeowner's exemption which would bring the taxes down drastically. Again, as a landlord I pay about $700 a year per house for insurance. As a homeowner it would probably be in the same range as the homeowner would require contents coverage which I don't have.


Each house sits on about a quarter of an acre. There are few deed restrictions as to birdhouses, that sort of thing, but you can't tacky-up the house. We don't have an HOA per se. The monthly fee is to pay for the amenities, cable, and trash/garbage.


There is a hospital within about 4 miles of the subdivision as well as doctors' offices, Walmart, Publix, Winn Dixie, Save-a-Lot, CVS drugstore, Dollar General, Big Lots, restaurants, Lowes, and hardware stores. There are three other 55+ communities in the same area, one of which has a public golf course. This area is serviced by an electric co-op so power is cheap. County water is about $20-30 a month. They're on septic tanks so no sewer fee.


There's lots to do in Ocala and we're about an hour and a half from a nice beach. In the area of these homes, the crime is very low. There are parts of Ocala where one doesn't want to live, but every town has those areas.


Just pointing out there are houses available in the price range of the trailer noted in this thread, so you don't have to settle for something that will blow away!
We're about 25 minutes from Ocala and go there often. As you said, there is lots to do in Ocala. Plenty of shopping and restaurants. Our church is there, there is at least one good hospital and lots of doctors. Plus, as you mentioned there are homes that are very affordable and in nice areas. My husband's barber and his wife just sold there home and moved to a very nice retirement community. It's in an area of Ocala with lots of new homes and stores. I think Ocala is a great option in retirement.
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