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Old 04-01-2016, 08:33 PM
 
781 posts, read 594,871 times
Reputation: 1457

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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Big Lebowski Dude View Post
Soylent Green is people!

If you don't understand how that film reference is relevant to this discussion, watch the movie. And, yes, I meant the comment to be tongue-in-cheek - hence the smiley face



Logan's Run was an OK film - but, I highly recommend the 1967?! novel; it's far superior to the '70's film.
I read it way back when; although that was a long time ago. I do remember liking it though. I liked both, for different reasons.
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Old 04-01-2016, 09:10 PM
 
5,081 posts, read 2,229,932 times
Reputation: 3970
Quote:
Originally Posted by craigiri View Post
But the rubber has to meet the road somewhere.

It's not that old people are selfish - I'd put forward the theory that our entire system in the USA is predatory and it would rather make medical money from you (and from the government) than have you be healthy or pull the switch.

Anyway, what I am saying about the rubber is - what do you suggest for an 85 year old who is in terrible pain but replacing both hips may stop most of it?

There are only 3 choices I see here.

1. Have the operation
2. Fly to Switzerland one way and be done with it.
3. Live in horrible pain, perhaps for years, until you expire.

Our "morals" in the US of A seem to stop the topic of ending one's life before we get to a serious discussion. After all, the Lord Doth Not Approve according to the people who know.

I want to think I'll have the moxie to head to Switzerland when the time comes. But yet I don't see packed planes full of one-way passengers, so I assume most people think about this stuff but don't take action - and become yet another senior working the system.



I have a fourth choice..........Strap all the high explosives on me that I can carry, Throw me out of a plane {with a chute............or not?} close to an ISIL strongpoint and i'll detonate at the most opportune time.
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Old 04-01-2016, 09:27 PM
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,547 posts, read 17,556,449 times
Reputation: 16777
Quote:
Originally Posted by misskittytalks View Post
Lord, no, no age 300 unless I was a vampire, maybe, with unlimited $$. That's just too much, and too much of other people dying around me.

Also depends upon any chronic health conditions. I've had bad discs for years and only mid-40's, so not sure if I'd want to be running around in pain past 80. Wouldn't mind 100 if healthy.
If aging slowed to a crawl, or froze and I could be in good health, heck yes, I'd love to live to 300. As a history buff, I want to know if we manage to destroy ourselves or not. Even better, give me a robot body and transfer my mind and let me choose at which point I want to self erase. Or maybe I'd have an organicly grown body with some addins and slowed aging and mix in with the general run if I wanted to.

Vampire, ummmm, they are cool. I'm already a night person so maybe there's a little of their dna in me
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Old 04-01-2016, 09:37 PM
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,547 posts, read 17,556,449 times
Reputation: 16777
My ggrandfather died at 91, back in the 20's. My grandfather died at 92. My 5xgreat grandfather who came here on a slave ship as a convict lived to 91. He really beat the percentages back in the 1700's.

Mom's family has a lot of men and women who at least reached the late 80's over a century before. More women died younger but then they had a lot of kids. I hope to be among those who make it to 90 plus. Mom left us at 62 too soon but she had a brain anurism burst, so she could have left us at any time and its good we didn't know.

If you have genetic contributions who could live to 90 I'd say today with all the stuff around it might be how much over 90 are you shooting for?
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Old 04-01-2016, 11:10 PM
 
8,978 posts, read 8,115,335 times
Reputation: 19497
Quote:
How is 90 the former 70? Explain to me. Was the average of death upper 50's a few years ago as its upper 70's now?? No.
Men and women above the age of 90 are now the fastest-growing segment of the U.S. population. Start of the 1900s, the average death age has increased from 49 to almost 79 today. That is a 30 year life expectancy change, or a 61% increase. And the reason they say today 90 is the former 70 is the health of those 90 year olds, is on an average better than that of a 70 year old 30 to 40 years ago.

Living to 90 and beyond - CBS News
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Old 04-01-2016, 11:32 PM
 
Location: Haiku
4,123 posts, read 2,584,370 times
Reputation: 6075
Quote:
Originally Posted by craigiri View Post
It's not that old people are selfish - I'd put forward the theory that our entire system in the USA is predatory and it would rather make medical money from you (and from the government) than have you be healthy or pull the switch.
I tend to agree with that. The medical industry is providing a product that they sell to a vulnerable audience - the elderly who are afraid of dying. It is an expensive product and the ones footing the bill are the young folks.

Quote:

Anyway, what I am saying about the rubber is - what do you suggest for an 85 year old who is in terrible pain but replacing both hips may stop most of it?
I suggest the it is up to that person. But he/she should stop being hammered on by doctors to get surgery. It is like the constant drug ads on TV - the industry is not worried about you and me, it is worried about making money. Somebody needs to be a neutral party that looks at what is right for society and what is right for the patient. Doctors are not a neutral party in that.
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Old 04-02-2016, 05:47 AM
 
Location: RVA
2,172 posts, read 1,268,333 times
Reputation: 4487
I guess it depends on the Dr . Predator suggests unwilling victims . That's not often the case with many elderly, or people in general. At some point in your life, more time at any cost is fine. Money does you no good dead. Not that I don't agree medical costs are extravagant, but some, like joint replacements are near miracles. Miracles don't come cheap.
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Old 04-02-2016, 06:29 AM
 
Location: NC Piedmont
3,911 posts, read 2,881,013 times
Reputation: 6291
90 is the new 70? I had heard that 50 is the new 30, but 9 PM is the new midnight...
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Old 04-02-2016, 06:43 AM
 
11,139 posts, read 8,551,921 times
Reputation: 28136
Quote:
Originally Posted by craigiri View Post
But the rubber has to meet the road somewhere.

It's not that old people are selfish - I'd put forward the theory that our entire system in the USA is predatory and it would rather make medical money from you (and from the government) than have you be healthy or pull the switch.

Anyway, what I am saying about the rubber is - what do you suggest for an 85 year old who is in terrible pain but replacing both hips may stop most of it?

There are only 3 choices I see here.

1. Have the operation
2. Fly to Switzerland one way and be done with it.
3. Live in horrible pain, perhaps for years, until you expire.

Our "morals" in the US of A seem to stop the topic of ending one's life before we get to a serious discussion. After all, the Lord Doth Not Approve according to the people who know.

I want to think I'll have the moxie to head to Switzerland when the time comes. But yet I don't see packed planes full of one-way passengers, so I assume most people think about this stuff but don't take action - and become yet another senior working the system.
Can you explain to me why an able bodied 85 year old cannot just commit suicide here is the US? People do it everyday. There is no need to go abroad and it has nothing to do with the moral culture here in the US.
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Old 04-02-2016, 08:29 AM
 
13,322 posts, read 25,574,131 times
Reputation: 20515
Depends on what's going on. Health, activity, people... Everyone I'm related to had survived or died of cancer. Everyone. Since I made it to 63 without issue, I look to the future and just allow that I want to see what's going on and how I'm feeling about aging. My one surviving relative is 90 and if she'd had her knee replaced when she should have ("I hate doctors") her current quality of life would be fairly good.

My father lived to 87, walking two miles a day until a quick cancer diagnosis ended him in seven weeks. My mother would probably still be around if she hadn't chain-smoked for 45 years, and even then, lived to be 77. I look to the genetics and make assumptions.
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