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Old 03-30-2016, 11:21 AM
 
Location: Franklin, TN
3,516 posts, read 5,671,749 times
Reputation: 2040

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All depends on your health, of course, but my grandmother (who passed at 96) and my mother (who decided to leave at 91) both were in decent health and spirit until 85. That's my goal age. With my Mom, she was the only one left in her family and circle of friends of her generation and I think she missed shared memories that were older than us kids.

Depends on money, too. My Dad had Alzheimers for the last 15 years of his life and it was over a half a million dollars in nursing home care. We took care of him as long as we could, at home, but at some point it was just too hard and our own health was suffering.

My Mom, after a year in 'independent living' and then 'skilled nursing' simply said "ENOUGH". Even though her vitals were good and Hospice said she was fine, she decided to stop eating and drinking. Hospice talked to her, a clergy person talked to her, and she was very firm in her wanting to 'go'. So Hospice said they would support her with pain meds, anxiety medication, and after 7 days, she passed. It was pretty peaceful.

When I run out of health, money, and joy - I would consider this. I hope that in the next 20 years there might be a pill available. My other plan was to jump off a cruise ship after the midnight chocolate buffet . . .

It's the dehydration that causes death. And as I said, it was pretty peaceful.
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Old 03-30-2016, 11:29 AM
 
Location: delaware
688 posts, read 863,777 times
Reputation: 2367
yes, of course, we have no choice in the matter, and we are expressing individual opinions here.




for me, it would depend on who is left to age with, and how important they are to my life. i'm fairly certain that activities and friends would not be enough for me; although important, they, alone, are not crucial enough , to want to prolong life. and has been said, without cognitive health, and fairly decent mobility,i don't think i'd be interested.


I don't think i'll change my mind as I grow older,but, who knows?




catsy
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Old 03-30-2016, 11:44 AM
 
Location: Sierra Nevada Land, CA
8,388 posts, read 9,131,891 times
Reputation: 13025
If you asked me that question twenty years ago I would have said no. Even to be 80, no! But in the last 20 years medical science has come a long way and I've seen too many healthy and active people in their 80s to say no to being 85. One example: met this guy on the Ski slope a couple of years ago. He took up skiing when he retired at age 65. That was 15 years prior. At that same resort we had an instructor who was 86 at the time.

I'll be 90 in 24 years, by then who knows what further medical advancements may occur? 90 is the new 70!
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Old 03-30-2016, 11:51 AM
 
Location: NC Piedmont
3,911 posts, read 2,875,565 times
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I have a few older relatives that are past 85 and like other posters I have a mixed bag of news. I would rather be here as a spry old senior than pass on just because I have limits.
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Old 03-30-2016, 12:11 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
6,544 posts, read 3,653,233 times
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I would like to get to 90+ but my genetics say this is unlikely...but science and medicine advances every day. Why not if you are able to lead a good life?

On the other hand, some folks outlive spouses, siblings, friends and children so a social or family network disappears -- I'm not too keen on that idea and I have a small family already and a widower with 22 years left to reach 90.
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Old 03-30-2016, 12:20 PM
 
Location: Over yonder a piece
3,908 posts, read 4,644,145 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jp03 View Post
I don't get the infatuation with living very old. A nursing home? Barely being able to see, hear or walk is not living. Not having the ability to do things on my own is more frightening than dying. I look at even "healthy" 90 year olds and shudder. Not to mention the drain on our medical system and our families.

Thankfully modern medicine has allowed us to live happier and healthier well into our 80's and that's where we benefit. But until someone figures out how to slow the aging process...no thanks.

Please powers that be ...let me live well into my 80's (if I'm lucky) and then strike me down swiftly and efficiently
My grandmother was vibrant and healthy until her death just a couple months shy of 100 years old. She lived a life well-lived. She went dancing once a week until she was 98 (she only stopped when the dance instructor suddenly closed the only dance studio in town). My grandmother also lived independently until she was 98 and had tons of friends that she had known for 40-50 years. She was rarely in need of medical care and even in her late 90s she looked like she was in her 70s and was often mistaken for being my mother instead of my grandmother (I'm in my mid-40s).

In her last year of life she still lived independently, in an apartment at a retirement community about 10 minutes from my house. She came to our house for dinner all the time, and I went over to hang out with her 3-4x a week. She played in her weekly bridge game the day before she died.

I'd be perfectly thrilled being able to live the life my grandmother had.
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Old 03-30-2016, 12:23 PM
 
20,077 posts, read 11,137,874 times
Reputation: 20120
Quote:
Originally Posted by jp03 View Post
I don't get the infatuation with living very old. A nursing home? Barely being able to see, hear or walk is not living. Not having the ability to do things on my own is more frightening than dying. I look at even "healthy" 90 year olds and shudder. Not to mention the drain on our medical system and our families.

Thankfully modern medicine has allowed us to live happier and healthier well into our 80's and that's where we benefit. But until someone figures out how to slow the aging process...no thanks.

Please powers that be ...let me live well into my 80's (if I'm lucky) and then strike me down swiftly and efficiently
Look up "Jack LaLanne," who was still doing a two-hour workout every day up to the day before he died at 96.
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Old 03-30-2016, 12:45 PM
 
Location: Central NY
4,653 posts, read 3,235,973 times
Reputation: 11907
I don't think a lot about it. It kind of bothers me to think I'm close to the "end." I am not afraid of death. Almost 74, in decent health, still so much to enjoy about life. No, don't have a lot of money so no big travel in future. But love nature, enjoy my friends, mostly have a positive outlook tho sometimes that tanks. But for the most part, I can't really imagine leaving. While my life has had difficult times that were not always easy to get through, I still think life is an adventure.

Live till I'm 90? Only if I can do what I'm doing now.

Last edited by NYgal1542; 03-30-2016 at 12:46 PM.. Reason: Added a line.
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Old 03-30-2016, 01:00 PM
eok
 
6,684 posts, read 3,167,316 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jim9251 View Post
If I could find a way to live to 300, I would. 90 isn't that old anymore.
300 is the new 90.
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Old 03-30-2016, 01:03 PM
 
Location: Ohio
19,875 posts, read 14,221,081 times
Reputation: 16070
Quote:
Originally Posted by jp03 View Post
Not to mention the drain on our medical system and our families.
What drain? Your own government refutes your claim.

The Costs of Healthcare:

1] Technology up to 65%
2] Consumer Demand up to 36%
3] Expanding Health Benefits or Insuring more people up to 13%
4] Healthcare Price Inflation up to 19% (caused by Consumer Demand and insuring more people)
5] Administrative Costs up to 13% (caused by Technology, Consumer Demand and Regulations)
6] Aging/Elderly up to 7%

Source: United States Government General Accounting Office GAO-13-281 PPACA and the Long-Term Fiscal Outlook, January 2013 pp 31-36

That means that if the cost of healthcare increases by 5% in a given year, then no more than 7% of that 5% is due to the Aging/Elderly.

If you want to lay blame, then lay blame properly where it belongs: on preterm/premature births.
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