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Old 03-30-2016, 01:10 PM
 
6,306 posts, read 5,042,575 times
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Have to be honest, depends on how I look too! Will I start coloring my hair blue and get perms? Will I forget to wear longer blouses/ tops so you can't see my Depends covered bottom?

These are the things I worry about. Lol

At my advanced age of 55ish, I still get compliments on my smooth clear complexion and long dark eyelashes. I don't color my hair, so not completely vain. Well it's more because my favorite hairdresser is not reliable and I don't want to walk around with unnatural looking hair. She was fabulous.

Maybe it is vanity. Better to look good than feel good!
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Old 03-30-2016, 01:13 PM
 
12,677 posts, read 14,063,903 times
Reputation: 34733
Quote:
Originally Posted by jp03 View Post
I don't get the infatuation with living very old. A nursing home? Barely being able to see, hear or walk is not living. Not having the ability to do things on my own is more frightening than dying.
Life as characterized above would be totally repellent to me.

Quote:
I look at even "healthy" 90 year olds and shudder. Not to mention the drain on our medical system and our families.
This is not something I agree with. I have a cousin in her nineties, and mentally she has more on the ball than most people far younger. She has many physical limitations, but none that cause her severe or constant pain. So, even with her physical limitations she is living an interesting life, and I feel that I could do the same - provided I still had my "smarts."

Quote:
Thankfully modern medicine has allowed us to live happier and healthier well into our 80's and that's where we benefit. But until someone figures out how to slow the aging process...no thanks.
I am almost 78, and am highly unlikely to live into my eighties, so it matters not.

Quote:
Please powers that be ...let me live well into my 80's (if I'm lucky) and then strike me down swiftly and efficiently
Do the job yourself at a time you feel is appropriate.
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Old 03-30-2016, 01:38 PM
 
9,578 posts, read 8,880,566 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr5150 View Post
If you asked me that question twenty years ago I would have said no. Even to be 80, no! But in the last 20 years medical science has come a long way and I've seen too many healthy and active people in their 80s to say no to being 85. One example: met this guy on the Ski slope a couple of years ago. He took up skiing when he retired at age 65. That was 15 years prior. At that same resort we had an instructor who was 86 at the time.

I'll be 90 in 24 years, by then who knows what further medical advancements may occur? 90 is the new 70!
If 90 was the new 70 we'd have a lot of 90 year olds running around. But we don't. There are some ...but not many. Hey, if you have all your faculties , enjoy life..that great! Live to 110.

For all the examples you all give of vibrant 90+ year olds . Its interesting how most are women.

I think of the golf course..the oldest guy I ever saw out there was 86. Never seen a 90 year old though I'm sure they are out there.
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Old 03-30-2016, 02:03 PM
 
Location: Dallas
5,601 posts, read 4,930,552 times
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No way do I want to live to 90. There may be active and vibrant 90 year olds out there, but not many.

When the day comes that I cannot take care of myself and my pets, it's time to check out. Becoming dependent, incontinent, bedridden, unable to walk, see, hear....no thank you.
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Old 03-30-2016, 02:33 PM
 
Location: Arizona
5,939 posts, read 5,293,703 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aquietpath View Post

When the day comes that I cannot take care of myself and my pets, it's time to check out. Becoming dependent, incontinent, bedridden, unable to walk, see, hear....no thank you.
No one would want to live like that at 50 let alone 90.
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Old 03-30-2016, 02:43 PM
 
3,311 posts, read 3,548,414 times
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My parents were pretty healthy. When my dad was around 80, he would always say he was "ready to go." My mom was fine and dandy. She began getting sick a lot when she was 90, and within about 8 months, she passed. By that time, my dad was definitely ready to go, he was saying things like, "they should just shoot us all by this age and put us out of our misery." So, 5 weeks after my mom went, he said, I'm done, and most definitely seriously ready to go, so he stopped eating and 3 weeks later he was with her.
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Old 03-30-2016, 02:50 PM
 
20,077 posts, read 11,137,874 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thinkalot View Post
No one would want to live like that at 50 let alone 90.
Indeed. The criteria should be vitality factors, not years.
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Old 03-30-2016, 03:13 PM
 
897 posts, read 1,520,475 times
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There was an article in Talk magazine a number of years ago entitled "You finally got a weeks vacation why did you take your laptop". In essence it said we have given up the "fun things in life" in a effort to live longer. We have passed on deserts, another drink, margarine vs butter, cream in our coffee, etc. I plan to go out with all body parts used and abused to the max.
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Old 03-30-2016, 03:21 PM
 
Location: Albuquerque NM
1,656 posts, read 1,521,066 times
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I admit I don't know that many people past 90 but most of the elderly that I know have given up driving by their mid 80's and are using a walker by 90. Lots of medical issues. Even if the medical issues are not serious, their life seems to be dominated by doctor's visits. As soon as they recover from one issue, the next one starts. Or they have something like a bad case of arthritis so are in constant pain or drugged up. And their world is rather limited living in a small apartment as they can no longer manage alone in a house and are very dependent on family. Unless my senior life is totally different, I prefer to die in my 80's but realize that I won't have much of a choice.
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Old 03-30-2016, 03:28 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,699 posts, read 23,651,778 times
Reputation: 35449
It's just a number.
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