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Old 04-03-2019, 12:38 AM
 
365 posts, read 90,689 times
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94 year old MIL goes to the DMV tomorrow...wish her luck. Lives alone, cooks, cleans and is still mobile. Same with her older sister - LOL.. And my uncle is older still and still driving.
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Old 04-06-2019, 07:31 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,004 posts, read 54,508,374 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GhostOfAndrewJackson View Post
94 year old MIL goes to the DMV tomorrow...wish her luck. Lives alone, cooks, cleans and is still mobile. Same with her older sister - LOL.. And my uncle is older still and still driving.
My mother is 90 and still driving, and so is her 94-year-old uncle. Both will only drive during the day and on local roads, though.

Mom drives herself to and from dialysis three times a week, and my great-uncle drives over to the assisted living every day to see his wife of 74 years. She is no longer mobile, and he can't care for her at home anymore. The nurses think they are cute because they are still so in love. They got married at 20 when she got pregnant.

Pretty sure that when one goes, the other will quickly follow.
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Old 04-07-2019, 06:47 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
10,276 posts, read 4,856,239 times
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Originally Posted by augiedogie View Post
I'm certainly not interested in making it to 90. I've had regular dealings with elderly people for the past 20 years as part of my job. In general, it seems like the fun is pretty much over by the time your 80 for the vast majority of people. After that they are typically home bound with little energy to do much, a failing memory or other physical ailments that limit their activities. There are a small percentage who do well past 80 but its not the norm. Heck by 85, 50% of the population is showing at least some signs of Alzheimers, if not full blown dementia.

EG My mother did well until 80, but after that she quit golf and bowling. In a few years she gave up cards, cause she couldn't keep track of what was played. She was pretty much limited to life in her condo, and even there, she couldn't concentrate on much but the weather channel. She eventually ended up in assisted living and died at 89 from a stroke. But she confessed she was ready to go, years before that.
My mother's 95 year old uncle told her it is all downhill from 80 and he was right. My mom hit 80 four years ago and that's when she was diagnosed with a serious illness. The medication caused additional problems and yesterday when I saw her I suddenly realized my mother is old. She has always looked fabulous for her age and she still doesn't look 84 as far as wrinkles and all but she is now looking frail. It was kind of a shock because she was always so beautiful and glamourous. She resembled Sophia Loren for many years.
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Old 04-07-2019, 10:43 AM
 
Location: Tucson Arizona
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My paternal grandmother died at age 92, while jaywalking home from the grocery store.

My mother died at 90, bedridden from strokes for the last two years of her life.

If I got a choice, I'd go like grandma. Or even like my dad, instantly dead of a heart attack at age 73.
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Old 04-10-2019, 04:07 PM
 
Location: Land of the Great Bears
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"I don't want to achieve immortality through my work; I want to achieve immortality through not dying."-Woody Allen.
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Old 04-11-2019, 05:44 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
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I realize I didn't answer the question. I would not want to live to be 90. I hope to go out before I become unable to care for myself. In my sleep would be nice.
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Old 04-11-2019, 04:21 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,004 posts, read 54,508,374 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chiluvr1228 View Post
My mother's 95 year old uncle told her it is all downhill from 80 and he was right. My mom hit 80 four years ago and that's when she was diagnosed with a serious illness. The medication caused additional problems and yesterday when I saw her I suddenly realized my mother is old. She has always looked fabulous for her age and she still doesn't look 84 as far as wrinkles and all but she is now looking frail. It was kind of a shock because she was always so beautiful and glamourous. She resembled Sophia Loren for many years.
For my mother, she had a quad bypass and went into kidney failure (expected, she has PKD) just before she turned 87. Now 90, she is doing fairly well on her dialysis routine, but I see her weakening, and just the other day, one of those "Five years ago" photos popped up on my FB, and it was a picture of Mom. She looked much healthier, robust, and less frail.
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Old 04-15-2019, 09:39 AM
 
Location: NYC
2,898 posts, read 1,582,286 times
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My mother is 92 & still mostly mobile but with a cane & still has most of her faculties. She didn't want to move from the house after my dad passed 27 years ago so she is isolated on a cul de sac in the burbs but can't drive or walk anywhere. Most of her days are spent alone doing house chores over & over, that keeps her moving. Her 3 grandchildren in their early 20's who live in a nearby town rarely visit or even return her calls even as she leaves messages for them every week to call her. Their father, my brother, is almost as bad, maybe calls her once/twice a month.

Most of her lifelong friends are dead, the few that remain are mostly incapacitated in some way & not mobile (can't visit) & now the "younger" tier of friends in their early 80's/late 70's are getting sick so rarely visit. Her surviving sisters live in Europe, the one younger by a year is bedridden with dementia for years & the other 2 said they will never travel to the US.

A brother lives with her & is her companion & helpmate, he is one of those bachelors that never left home or had a relationship so it is a symbiotic relationship, I live a few counties away & stay with her for several days every other week.

I don't see much going on there that induces me to want to live that long: dusting, sweeping & watching tv alone in a big house in a dead end street. After dad passed I tried to discuss some ideas for her going forward such as downsizing the house (a 4 bedroom on 3 1/2 levels) to something smaller & more manageable & perhaps nearer some social outlet, she's really a social person - she wouldn't even begin to discuss it. I think my dad made all practical decisions & she is uneducated & simple & I think just frozen in place, we couldn't have a simple discussion.

I'm glad she is as healthy as she is but I can't see myself in that sort of situation if I make it to that age in that shape, I would like to be able to sit with someone or go somewhere, like a park or a cafe once in a while. I have already lost the bulk of my lifelong friends between 55-65yo. I certainly don't want to live that long if I have a degenerative condition or am institutionalized & dependent on helpers.
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Old 04-15-2019, 11:40 AM
 
Location: equator
3,410 posts, read 1,524,633 times
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We just watched "Our Planet" on Netflix, a David Attenborough production. We mused about how old he was: guessed maybe 75. He is 92!

A vigorous, engaging life and good genes?

https://www.bustle.com/p/our-planet-...ntary-17036960
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Old 04-15-2019, 12:37 PM
 
Location: Venus
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My grandmother lived to be 99 1/2 years young. She used a walker to get around but my sister called it her "runner." She would MOVE with it and sometimes knocking people over in the process. People learned to jump out of the way when they saw her coming. She lived in a retirement community but had her own apartment. She could make her meals if she wanted to or she could attend a community meal. They also did some housecleaning. She was still sharp as a tack up until the last 2 weeks of her life. She had a heart attack & a stroke. We don't know if the stroke brought on the heart attack or if the heart attack brought on the stroke. Either way, it was a one-two punch. She couldn't move, swallow or anything else. We basically said our good-byes and then they morphed her up and we just basically waited for her to die-which took two weeks.

My parents didn't live as long-we lost Dad at 79 & Ma at 82. Dad had pancreatic cancer and we all took turns taking care of him. Ma went into a nursing home for the last year of her life.

I want to live as long as I can take care of myself, not be a burden on others, and still with it.


Cat
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