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Old 03-30-2016, 07:16 PM
 
6,746 posts, read 3,854,200 times
Reputation: 15441

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Quote:
Originally Posted by PhxBarb View Post
My mom died at 102. She was still the Golden Agers club president at age 100. She planned activities, wrote a newsletter and handled all the details at the town hall. She cut her own grass til age 89. She gardened and planted flowers til she died. In 2000 she was the parade grand marshall for the village's 4th of July celebration. She was senior citizen of the year a few times and had luncheons in her honor. She lived in a 2 story house her whole life and never had a cleaning lady. One spring she was seen hanging out of the second story window, cleaning out the gutter.

My point is we all live as long as we are needed on earth. Whether or not you want to live to 90 is not a good question. You may not have a choice so better make the best of it.
How wonderful to have a mother like that!!
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Old 03-30-2016, 08:47 PM
 
12,825 posts, read 20,129,272 times
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Another corner case no doubt ... I've a friend who recently decided to move to a senior community.

She said, well, I hit my 95th birthday, I suppose it's time to go live with all the old people.

For the longest time I had no clue how old she was and only found out around the time she turned 92.
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Old 03-30-2016, 08:59 PM
 
406 posts, read 369,941 times
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I'm 63 and feel very young. Who knows how I'll feel at 90. Maybe I'll feel more or less the same. You never know. I'm in no hurry to die. There is so much left to do and learn.
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Old 03-30-2016, 09:08 PM
 
Location: Whereever we have our RV parked
8,762 posts, read 7,693,193 times
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I'm certainly not interested in making it to 90. I've had regular dealings with elderly people for the past 20 years as part of my job. In general, it seems like the fun is pretty much over by the time your 80 for the vast majority of people. After that they are typically home bound with little energy to do much, a failing memory or other physical ailments that limit their activities. There are a small percentage who do well past 80 but its not the norm. Heck by 85, 50% of the population is showing at least some signs of Alzheimers, if not full blown dementia.

EG My mother did well until 80, but after that she quit golf and bowling. In a few years she gave up cards, cause she couldn't keep track of what was played. She was pretty much limited to life in her condo, and even there, she couldn't concentrate on much but the weather channel. She eventually ended up in assisted living and died at 89 from a stroke. But she confessed she was ready to go, years before that.
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Old 03-30-2016, 09:16 PM
 
13,874 posts, read 7,386,288 times
Reputation: 25351
For my 90th birthday, I'm going to take a fist full of blue pills, not call a physician after 4 hours like it recommends in the commercials, and die in bed with a 20-year-old.


Viagra FTW!
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Old 03-30-2016, 09:50 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,081 posts, read 22,924,480 times
Reputation: 35201
Quote:
Originally Posted by jp03 View Post
I don't get the infatuation with living very old. A nursing home? Barely being able to see, hear or walk is not living. Not having the ability to do things on my own is more frightening than dying. I look at even "healthy" 90 year olds and shudder. Not to mention the drain on our medical system and our families.

Thankfully modern medicine has allowed us to live happier and healthier well into our 80's and that's where we benefit. But until someone figures out how to slow the aging process...no thanks.

Please powers that be ...let me live well into my 80's (if I'm lucky) and then strike me down swiftly and efficiently
Agree 100%. Let me go when it gets too uncomfortable in this bod.
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Old 03-30-2016, 09:55 PM
 
Location: Close to an earthquake
890 posts, read 676,616 times
Reputation: 2390
My retirement planning uses age 95 as a life expectancy so that means yes I do really want to live to be 90.
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Old 03-30-2016, 10:39 PM
 
Location: Out there somewhere...a traveling man.
39,527 posts, read 47,687,050 times
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My goal is to hit 100. Our family has a history of high 90's in the gene pool and they are very active.
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Old 03-30-2016, 11:08 PM
 
6,950 posts, read 3,857,584 times
Reputation: 14766
Quote:
Originally Posted by jp03 View Post
I don't get the infatuation with living very old. A nursing home? Barely being able to see, hear or walk is not living. Not having the ability to do things on my own is more frightening than dying. I look at even "healthy" 90 year olds and shudder. Not to mention the drain on our medical system and our families.

Thankfully modern medicine has allowed us to live happier and healthier well into our 80's and that's where we benefit. But until someone figures out how to slow the aging process...no thanks.

Please powers that be ...let me live well into my 80's (if I'm lucky) and then strike me down swiftly and efficiently


This post raise more questions about the OP than it does about the subject. I say this as someone whose parents died at an average age of 92 and had only very short periods of partial incapacity. I say this also as someone who the CDC says will live, on average, 12 years longer than my parents by birth year. I don't believe I'll be anywhere near ready to go at 90.


Someone born in 1900 had a life expectancy of 49 years; in 1950 it was 68 and by 2000 was 77. That's a pretty good improvement. Would the OP have been posting in 1895 that he wouldn't want to live past 45?
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Old 03-30-2016, 11:55 PM
 
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
7,604 posts, read 4,680,291 times
Reputation: 27811
Back when I had an office outside the home, I would occasionally see an older man on my commute, standing on a corner. He'd be wearing a cowboy hat, a shirt, shorts and be carrying a briefcase. He was clearly hoping for a ride.

One day I stopped for him and he asked if I could take him to Safeway (so he could use the bank there). He said that sometimes he did walk all the way and back, which would have been a 3 mile round trip. He also said he was 95 and a retired teacher.

I gave him a ride on another occasion but haven't seen him in a year or so. Then again, I no longer commute, so he could still be above ground.
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