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Old 04-03-2016, 03:00 PM
 
Location: Loudon, TN
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Odie, we need a little more to go on before we can offer any intelligent suggestions. Warm places, possibly with a lake, covers a lot of territory. I guess a condo or high rise apartment could be snake-free anywhere. We need more info on what they are looking for.
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Old 04-03-2016, 03:46 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveinMtAiry View Post
As we are looking too I looked at the weather for Rock Hill, SC and it's too hot for us. Any SC suggestion that are more in the mountains?
South Carolina has some areas with mountains (by eastern standards). Like 3000 feet or so. Not anywhere most people would care to have more than a rural bucolic summer place IMO (if that).

It's hard to get past some places are too cold a lot of the time - and others too hot. Maybe in Hawaii - or some coastal areas in California. That's about it IMO when it comes to the US. So you have to pick your poison. Unless you are willing to run 2 households (which I'm not willing to do). Robyn
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Old 04-03-2016, 03:52 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
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Originally Posted by TheShadow View Post
Odie, we need a little more to go on before we can offer any intelligent suggestions. Warm places, possibly with a lake, covers a lot of territory. I guess a condo or high rise apartment could be snake-free anywhere. We need more info on what they are looking for.
I lived in a high rise condo in Miami where snakes would occasionally appear on the internal roads/the sides of the buildings/etc. trying to warm up in the winter. I think that in terms of retiring anywhere - the presence/absence of snakes wouldn't even be on my list of the 100 most important things to consider. Robyn
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Old 04-03-2016, 03:56 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
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Originally Posted by TwoByFour View Post
We all have our own desires and dislikes. Retirement can be the most fun, stress-free part of one's life and I see nothing wrong with looking for exactly what you want. If that is someplace with no snakes, so what?
Because you're restricting yourself to very small geographical areas. In the US - it's Maine - Hawaii and Alaska:

Top Places In The World Without Snakes | Pushkin's Pistol

Robyn
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Old 04-03-2016, 04:07 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
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Originally Posted by jlawrence01 View Post
We have packs of wandering javalinas in the neighborhood at night and they really do NOT bother the pets. They do get into the trash of the people who ignore the HOA rules and place their trash out at night and they will devour any tasty vegetables that you have planted like my wife's yellow squash.

In you are concerned about your pets, coyotes and wildcats pose a much greater danger. The people who have the biggest problem are people who let their dogs run off-leash and people who let their pets outside in a fenced yard at dawn or dusk. Fences and gates are generally not much of a deterrent to windcats or coyotes.
Guess they're kind of like raccoons in terms of getting into the garbage?

FWIW - I did say they were creepy looking - not dangerous (at least for people). We have something similar near where I live (although not where I live). Feral pigs. In a nearby nature preserve. The descendants of pigs brought here by Spanish settlers centuries ago. Also creepy looking. But - IIRC - they're not protected in any way in terms of hunting (OTOH - not too many people care to hunt and kill and eat them).

On my part - I've found that some of the worst nuisances aren't the large scary looking things - like snakes. Or feral pigs. Or spiders. They're the tiny things - like fire ants. I've never had a problem with a snake - but have had many issues with fire ants. Robyn
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Old 04-03-2016, 04:14 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
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Originally Posted by TuborgP View Post
Food for thought. Is the economic trend of the region up or down. What is the migration pattern of the younger population? Will the infrastructure be there for your support in 20-30 years. Much of Medicaid is state. Will those resources be there in sufficient amounts in 20-30 years and who will you be competing against for them.
Do you mean to say Medicaid? Why would anyone plan to retire - especially at an early age - knowing they would need Medicaid? Robyn
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Old 04-03-2016, 04:17 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
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Originally Posted by Poncho_NM View Post
No Snakes In Hawaii, Except For The 2 Found Since September


"On Tuesday morning, a pedestrian in Honolulu’s Chinatown came across a snake in the sidewalk.

Now it’d be surprising enough to stumble upon a two-and-a-half foot non-venomous rainbow boa constrictor at 7 a.m., but in Hawaii it’s downright shocking.

That’s because, technically, Hawaii doesn’t have any snakes. Not only because it’s paradise, but because, as Discover.com reminds us, “as an isolated archipelago, the only way for wildlife species to get to the Hawaiian Islands is to fly or swim across the Pacific Ocean.” "
Some might arrive in the wheel wells of planes. And perhaps others might be brought in by morons defying the animal importation laws/rules. The latter is how we wound up with pythons in the Everglades in Florida (and other invasive species in the state). Robyn
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Old 04-03-2016, 04:59 PM
 
Location: Paranoid State
13,047 posts, read 10,460,401 times
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Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
Honolulu is expensive. I was in Hilo last month, which is reasonable. City Data has the basic details. Houses average about $250k. Utilities costs are very low...
Hmmm. Driving around Oahu, I saw many houses with photovoltaic panels on their roof. My guess was electricity must have been quite expensive.
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Old 04-03-2016, 05:10 PM
 
Location: Paranoid State
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Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
Unless you are willing to run 2 households (which I'm not willing to do). Robyn
That was our solution. Multiple residences.
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Old 04-03-2016, 07:35 PM
 
14,266 posts, read 24,021,014 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
Guess they're kind of like raccoons in terms of getting into the garbage?

FWIW - I did say they were creepy looking - not dangerous (at least for people). We have something similar near where I live (although not where I live). Feral pigs. In a nearby nature preserve. The descendants of pigs brought here by Spanish settlers centuries ago. Also creepy looking. But - IIRC - they're not protected in any way in terms of hunting (OTOH - not too many people care to hunt and kill and eat them).

On my part - I've found that some of the worst nuisances aren't the large scary looking things - like snakes. Or feral pigs. Or spiders. They're the tiny things - like fire ants. I've never had a problem with a snake - but have had many issues with fire ants. Robyn

IMO, feral pigs are a much larger problem as well as more dangerous than javalina. Having said that, when the young javalinas are born in May, I do not want to get between mama and baby as an 85# sow can inflict a lot of damage on a leg.

Feral pigs can grow much bigger and the reproductive cycle of feral pigs is explosive. Feral pigs can produce five litters every two years where as javalinas are annual. And baby javalinas are a very favorite food source for our local coyote population. I must say that in another month or so I will start hearing the javalina vs. coyote battles from 10 pm - 2 am many nights.

In many states with a large population of feral pigs, you can shoot them 24/7/365 with no limits - the more the merrier. In Missouri, if you are deer hunting, you are supposed to kill any pig yopu see. By the way, check the local hunting laws as they do vary.
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