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Old 04-11-2016, 11:38 PM
 
Location: Boca Raton, FL
5,164 posts, read 8,687,150 times
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Many Baby Boomers are still in their 50's - early 60's.
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Old 04-11-2016, 11:45 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
6,544 posts, read 3,650,165 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ersatz View Post
Want culture change? Time to push baby boomers into retirement - FederalNewsRadio.com

claims that one way to improve the Federal Government is to get rid of remaining Baby Boom employees. They are a drag on the government given their materialist interests and inability to embrace collaboration and information sharing."
Heard this all before. Just some bean-counter consultant who noticed that Boomers tend to stay in their jobs and gain experience as well as higher salary grades over time and earn a pension. It's called reliability and job commitment. The younger "tech savvy" workers job-hop and won't increase in salary as much.


The next recommendations will be out-sourcing all government jobs to the private sector...already well underway. When you go into a public library or a public service government office that employee you talk to might not be a government employee, is working at lower pay, has very limited benefits (if any) and no job protections.
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Old 04-12-2016, 02:09 AM
 
13 posts, read 7,404 times
Reputation: 38
A College Student

No one owes you anything. As an adult, you chose to acquire, as you stated, crushing debt to obtain a degree. Many people that cannot afford the cost of a university degree learn alternative, high paying career skills through community colleges or by starting at the bottom and clawing their way to the top. You are no more special than the next person.

There are no guarantees in life. Many baby boomers also acquired university degrees, as well as, high paying careers, with good healthcare and retirement benefits, only to be terminated from those jobs. They lost their careers and their retirement benefits. Many baby boomers lost everything they worked their entire life for, including their homes and cars. Life is not fair.

I can't imagine why you would think baby boomers feel threatened by your generation? Why would you think that a baby boomer should give up their job so you could take their place? This is not fantasy land, this is the real world. You are correct though, about respect needing to be earned. You earn respect by showing respect, then, it will be returned. Respect works both ways. Degrees do not earn automatic respect.

Everyone is stereotyped throughout their lives, from the moment you are born until the day you die. You are guilty of stereotyping the baby boomers,as well.

Every generation has done and will continue to do great things. The next generation will also think that your generation destroyed the world for them. That is the way life is. Just as there will always be racism, sexism, discrimination; these thing will never be overcome. It is an improbable task.

Young and old are having difficulty finding good paying jobs. We the people do not control what our government does. Jobs have been outsourced; technology has eliminated many more. Dr.'s lawyers, engineers, etc., can't find work, due to advances in technology.

Your whole post is one of a person that made choices in their adult life without careful consideration of all aspects of those choices.
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Old 04-12-2016, 02:50 AM
 
7,980 posts, read 3,458,329 times
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Some of these younger generation need to realize the older generation is not disposable. The oldsters paved the way for most of these spoiled brats.....
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Old 04-12-2016, 03:22 AM
 
Location: Washington State
18,445 posts, read 9,548,793 times
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Based on my observations, I don't think being a good employee or not is based on which generation one happens to fall in. As a younger Boomer, I do wonder if the next generation will be as innovative or entrepreuneurial as the Boomers have been...I hope so.

About retirement, I 'retired' in December still in my 50's and have enjoyed it....however, my former employer asked me to come back to work some problems in their business in the Middle East for a few months that could be longer...younger employees should be capable but they haven't had the experience yet that I've got. I don't need the money but my Millenial son wants me to invest in a business he wants to launch, wife wants a new house (materialistic Boomer?) so I'll probably go.
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Old 04-12-2016, 04:57 AM
 
Location: Tucson for awhile longer
8,872 posts, read 13,541,035 times
Reputation: 29032
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vision67 View Post
Large corporations have been dumping the older employees since about 2001. Nothing new here.
Actually, at the Fortune 100 where I worked, it started in the mid-1990s. They were offering financial packages to older engineers to vacate their positions to make room for new grads. Not because the young people knew more ... they didn't. But they accepted lower pay and cost less in benefits, especially health insurance. I can't even begin to imagine how many baby boomers could possibly remain in that company to jettison. Can't be that many.

And the problem with the younger generation they hired to replace them? They have no loyalty to the company. I can't blame them. I watched my father, who worked for the same company his entire life, have his job ended at age 58. I watched so many of my older co-workers ushered out the door that I bit on the first deal that was dangled in front of me. I feared my division would be sold and I would just get laid off by the new owners. So I took the money and ran.

But the issue is, employers are finding that they spend a lot of money finding qualified new young hires and training them but the minute something happens they don't like, they leave. They don't stick around and try to change the culture. They just look for greener grass. They have no concept of the lifetime jobs my father's generation coveted and experienced.

That's why you see today's companies making incentives for millennials that seem crazy to older people. Bring your dog to work. Nap rooms, gyms, and pool tables in the building. Starbucks in the building. Dry cleaners stopping by the office to pick up laundry and have food stores delivering groceries. Maternity leave for men as well as women. These things were unheard of to those of us who championed "take your daughter to work day" and had to fight the employer for the simple right to demonstrate corporate jobs to girls once a year.

I don't know where all these elders are hogging the jobs. I've never personally known a single person over the age of 65 who was still working for the same employer they worked for at age 50. People might still be working at age 70. But clocking in for an employer who's still giving them full-time work with their usual pay and benefits? Where is that happening?

Other than an elected position like Congress, it's very unlikely to be a government job. Government retirements are too lucrative and people want to take them while they still are. I know some FBI agents and military people who retire as soon as their 30 years are up. Then go back to work on a contract basis because their skills are needed for Homeland Security projects. But those jobs wouldn't be available if there were enough QUALIFIED younger people to take them. And those contract people aren't even 65. More like 55. People who were hired around age 25 and put in 30 years in various government agencies. Is that what a recent grad thinks a geezer is these days? Maybe that's the issue.

Last edited by Jukesgrrl; 04-12-2016 at 05:11 AM..
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Old 04-12-2016, 05:57 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
4,830 posts, read 4,944,472 times
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When I retired last year at 66 there was just one other career person remaining in the organization who was older than that. That's one out of 350. The pace in high tech requires a lot of stamina. I didn't have the same strength as I did at 23. So I decided it was time to go.

However, I may go back part time as a consultant because the company cannot find 20 somethings with the skill sets needed. Since I retired I have receive about 4 requests per week from head hunters to go back to work.

I think the problem is that my skill set (analog and microwave electronics) requires an advanced degree and at $30K+ per year, those 7 years of education cost more than the young people can afford. Also, this stuff was appealing in the late 60s and 70s but now much of the development in electronics happens outside the USA.

Back in the day, my company would offer free graduate school tuition with full pay to selected engineers. Those days are over. Companies now demand that employees deliver results from day 1.

This country is in trouble. We need a new generation of engineers to replace the geezers but instead of the low cost schooling that we had we've decided to no longer fund state colleges.
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Old 04-12-2016, 06:43 AM
 
Location: Florida
4,103 posts, read 4,270,883 times
Reputation: 10054
Quote:
Originally Posted by SunGrins View Post
Heard this all before. Just some bean-counter consultant who noticed that Boomers tend to stay in their jobs and gain experience as well as higher salary grades over time and earn a pension. It's called reliability and job commitment. The younger "tech savvy" workers job-hop and won't increase in salary as much.


The next recommendations will be out-sourcing all government jobs to the private sector...already well underway. When you go into a public library or a public service government office that employee you talk to might not be a government employee, is working at lower pay, has very limited benefits (if any) and no job protections.
Youre backwards on that one. Its due to the elimination of pensions and the businesses commitments to its employees that causes the job hopping. I was laid off 3 years into my career along with 2000 people for better corporate EPS. After that I only view a company as a source of income, no loyalty. You cant find pensions anymore unless its in a handful of industries, none of which are in my area.

Ive also read plenty of studies that prove job hopping increases your salary more than loyalty. When I changed my last job I took a 15% raise. Compare that to measly 2% annual raises you get by being loyal.
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Old 04-12-2016, 06:46 AM
 
Location: Florida
4,103 posts, read 4,270,883 times
Reputation: 10054
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vision67 View Post
When I retired last year at 66 there was just one other career person remaining in the organization who was older than that. That's one out of 350. The pace in high tech requires a lot of stamina. I didn't have the same strength as I did at 23. So I decided it was time to go.

However, I may go back part time as a consultant because the company cannot find 20 somethings with the skill sets needed. Since I retired I have receive about 4 requests per week from head hunters to go back to work.

I think the problem is that my skill set (analog and microwave electronics) requires an advanced degree and at $30K+ per year, those 7 years of education cost more than the young people can afford. Also, this stuff was appealing in the late 60s and 70s but now much of the development in electronics happens outside the USA.

Back in the day, my company would offer free graduate school tuition with full pay to selected engineers. Those days are over. Companies now demand that employees deliver results from day 1.

This country is in trouble. We need a new generation of engineers to replace the geezers but instead of the low cost schooling that we had we've decided to no longer fund state colleges.
Around here the State Unis are too busy funding massive building projects for sports complexes and "student engagement centers" than providing a low(er) cost quality education. Even the community colleges are starting to follow suit.
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Old 04-12-2016, 07:06 AM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,917,951 times
Reputation: 6716
Quote:
Originally Posted by SFBayBoomer View Post
I could do anything that requires mental agility and that is not very restrictive.

The list of things I could do (not counting physical limitations) is much greater than the list of things I could not do.

Learning a new foreign language well as an adult and being able to master the accents, the nuances, the idioms is considered to be very difficult. Foreign language learners and linguists, for example, do very well at learning computer languages, too. I have done that before, and feel confident I could do it again, though I have very little interest in computer programming anymore.

What is it that you think a younger person could do better than a very bright, mentally agile person who is older?.
My husband has a great ear for different languages - and the ability to speak with lots of difficult accents (at least they're difficult for me) - like French. He's only become fluent in one language - Spanish. With the aid of several years of private lessons and tons of work. He's good enough to conduct business in Spanish (which he did when he was working) - not good enough to be a UN interpreter.

These days - I usually plan our international trips about a year in advance. And he works on various languages for about a year before our trips. So I know how hard it is to acquire language skills. After a year's worth of intensive study - he is usually still at the "baby step" stage. Especially when it comes to languages like Japanese or German. We're going to Madrid next month - so that should be a relative piece of cake.

Curiously - my husband learned many computer languages after he retired too. Didn't realize there was a connection between learning foreign languages and computer languages.

When it comes to doing various jobs - it's hard for me to come up with concrete examples - because I don't know what people do in various jobs. For example - one of my nieces worked in public relations before she went back to school to get her MBA. Her clients were health care companies. And I assume that part of her job was to make sure her clients got the right kinds of mentions in social media - and to counter any negative stories. I don't have a clue how you do that.

I think the problem I see in this thread in general is older people bragging a lot about what they did years ago and dissing younger people for various reasons. The old "when I was a kid we had to walk 5 miles in the snow to get to school" kind of thing. This kind of attitude would be poison in any kind of corporate culture IMO.

On my part - although I didn't work in technology (I'm a lawyer) - I was exposed to and learned about technology starting many decades ago. Had to figure my way around things like old computers (starting with the IBM 5120 in about 1980):

https://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/e...s/pc/pc_6.html

For someone my age - 68 - I have gone from the age of face-to-face dictation - white out to make corrections - wet copy machines - punch cards for data storage - etc. to what we have now. I am somewhat proud that I learned about these things - but I'm really happy that you don't have to know how to program in Basic or jump through similar hoops to get things done today. OTOH - it's not like everything is easy today. In fact - I think it's harder. Lawyers have to learn about metadata - security systems that keep client information secure - working in the cloud - running websites - accepting new forms of (electronic) payment - e filing documents - computerized data management - etc. Larger law firms have technology staff to deal with these things - but small firms and solo practitioners have to fend for themselves. And - even if you have a tech department to help you solve problems - you still have to understand the issues. Like I've said - a lot of older lawyers are having trouble even understanding the issues - much less figuring out how to deal with them. OTOH - lots of younger lawyers don't have it any easier than older lawyers.

The Myth of the Digital Native. The kids will save us. They grew up immersed in technology. Wrong. The digital native is a myth. Acquiring a Twitter account in utero does not bestow an innate ability to commune with the machines. While 83 percent of millennials sleep with their smartphone, 58 percent of them struggle to solve basic problems using technology. Most of what passes for the technological sophistication of our youth comes in the form of passive consumption or, at best, rudimentary communication (texts, Facebook). They are not trained, and, therefore, do not know how to use the technology they encounter in a professional environment.

https://www.floridabar.org/DIVCOM/JN...0!OpenDocument

When I think about it - it's really an oppressive amount of technology. For lawyers of all ages. Robyn
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