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Old 04-13-2016, 07:26 AM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,969,752 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jukesgrrl View Post
And by the way, here's another job the baby boomers are hogging: taking care of the millennials' grandparents.

I don't personally know a single millennial who is a full-time caregiver of an elderly person incapable of living alone. But I personally know five baby boomers who are. Oh, and that doesn't count me, so six. I retired several years before I might have because my mother is virtually helpless and begged me not to "make her" go to assisted living. I haven't had more than three days in a row away from her in ten years now. Would some millennial like to have that job?
The millennials' time (as a generation) will come. When *their* parents get older. I don't recall ever taking care of my grandparents. Nor did anyone else I know. It is generally something that children do for their parents - not grandchildren for their grandparents.

The "Millennial" generation seems to be somewhat ill-defined when it comes to years of birth. But most people have it starting with births in 1981. So the oldest millennials would be in their mid-30's now. It's not common to have frail elderly sick parents when you're in your mid-30's. Note that there is a generation between the Baby Boomers and the Millennials - Generation X.

The Six Living Generations In America Marketing Teacher

Robyn
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Old 04-13-2016, 08:57 AM
 
3,304 posts, read 1,361,334 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by don1945 View Post
The one thing they overlook is that we "Baby Boomers" show up for work, are on time, do not talk on our cell phones or text all day, and we have knowledge that takes years to gain. I have outlasted a whole bunch of younger people at my work because I take my work seriously and know what I am doing.

Don
I am not a baby boomer. I am Gen X. I never agree with you Don but I do today . millenials just can't stay off their phones and they don't like hard work . they seem to be allergic to it. They don't have any respect for those that came before them.
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Old 04-13-2016, 09:00 AM
 
3,304 posts, read 1,361,334 times
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Somebody 35 is a Gen x . I know the generations are loosely defined. Somebody 35 has nothing in common with a 25 year old of today.
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Old 04-13-2016, 09:11 AM
 
Location: U.S. Pacific Northwest
251 posts, read 143,354 times
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If you have a problem with getting a job, the culture you should blame isn't the existence of your parents, or their need to work after two recessions and high unemployment while Republicans try to gut the social safety net...you should be after the "job creators" shopping work overseas.

Shame on you for assuming you have an entitlement to earn a living...while you're demanding one be given to you.

Retirement is a relatively new concept: working as long as you can has been the norm for a long, long time.
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Old 04-13-2016, 09:17 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,735 posts, read 17,677,734 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AfriqueNY View Post
Somebody 35 is a Gen x . I know the generations are loosely defined. Somebody 35 has nothing in common with a 25 year old of today.
I'm 30 and honestly don't feel like I have a lot in common with most 35 year olds. It does seem like a generational gap, but I feel like I'm "behind" for my age, for whatever it's worth.
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Old 04-13-2016, 10:24 AM
 
Location: New Mexico
6,663 posts, read 3,707,485 times
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We often hear these claims that the Boomers are in the way and should just move on. There is an occasional counter claim that the younger post-Boomer generations lack empathy and feel entitled and somehow privileged. Empathy is built on experience...often common experience. Earlier generations had the Great Depression and WW-II as a common experience. The Boomers had a variety of common experiences...polio, Viet-Nam, Civil Rights, boom and bust. There seems less of that in recent decades other than economic swings and college debt. There isn't that much of a major common experience and the advent of electronically empowered personal everything...tablets, i-Phones, gaming, etc. turns attention inward....to the great Me. They have to tell people not to talk on the phone when in a movie theater. When young people are together they are most often on their phones and not socializing face to face. Wikipedia offers this: "Empathy is the capacity to understand or feel what another being (a human or non-human animal) is experiencing from within the other being's frame of reference, i.e., the capacity to place oneself in another's position." I just don't see that happening a great deal among recent generations.


I looked up charitable contributions by generation to see it there was some measure of how different generations perform in support of charities. A (2013) study published in Forbes shows clearly that Boomers and "Matures" (pre-Boomers) are carrying the load. There is some reason for that but the fact remains that older generations are paying almost $100 billion each year in charitable contributions for medical research, poverty causes and veterans support, among others. Boomers seem to be in the habit of opening their checkbooks for charity. Younger generations...not so much.




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Old 04-13-2016, 10:28 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
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Many of the Gen X and Gen Y are not as comparatively well off and the Boomers were the largest cohort. Not sure there is all that much to see here.
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Old 04-13-2016, 10:42 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,784 posts, read 7,072,585 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pyewackette View Post
They were - 10 years ago. I'm at the tail end of the boomer generation and I'm 57.

Most boomers are over 60. The boomer generation started in 1946 and was so-named because when the men came home from WWII, the birth rate naturally shot up. By the time the official "end" of the boom came around, that had long tapered off. If you use the same cutoff for the "end" as they did for the beginning there is very little excuse for extending the "boom" past about 1960 at most.

Since then, with the advent of freely available birth control, the birthrate has continued to decline.

The oldest boomers are in their 70s by now.
They'd be 70 this year. Do the math.
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Old 04-13-2016, 01:33 PM
 
Location: Texas
1,326 posts, read 1,111,783 times
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Yes! As LadyAlice said "It's not helpful to characterize demographic sectors made up of millions of people as if they were all the same."

Just stupid. For one thing so called, so named artificially "baby boomers" are anything form old post-hippies, yuppies, liberals, conservatives, active and non-active, add in that the later year ones are younger and come from the punk scene. These are many varied groups right there within it.

People tell me I am at the tail end of that group-age wise and it depends on which chart you look at which is stupid and shows how stupid those categories are. I am gen X even if they stole the title and gave it to the group 10 plus years and more younger than me.

No one group should get retired-bad logic there.
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Old 04-13-2016, 02:26 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,969,752 times
Reputation: 6723
Quote:
Originally Posted by SunGrins View Post
...I looked up charitable contributions by generation to see it there was some measure of how different generations perform in support of charities. A (2013) study published in Forbes shows clearly that Boomers and "Matures" (pre-Boomers) are carrying the load. There is some reason for that but the fact remains that older generations are paying almost $100 billion each year in charitable contributions for medical research, poverty causes and veterans support, among others. Boomers seem to be in the habit of opening their checkbooks for charity. Younger generations...not so much...
Older people tend to have more disposable income than younger people. So there's no surprise there. And it's pretty hard to be charitable when you're still paying off $50k+ in student debt. Robyn
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