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Old 04-10-2016, 01:31 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,512 posts, read 17,740,343 times
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Unfortunately for the generation after millenials, the next demographic to dominate IT jobs will be computers. And of course burger flippers and baristas will be automated, too. Most of the next generation will be turned into fertilizer.
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Old 04-10-2016, 01:54 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
4,376 posts, read 1,813,549 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
Unfortunately for the generation after millenials, the next demographic to dominate IT jobs will be computers. And of course burger flippers and baristas will be automated, too. Most of the next generation will be turned into fertilizer.
Good we need to depopulate most of the vermin that swarm across the earth.
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Old 04-10-2016, 02:04 PM
 
13,092 posts, read 13,691,553 times
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Originally Posted by don1945 View Post
The one thing they overlook is that we "Baby Boomers" show up for work, are on time, do not talk on our cell phones or text all day, and we have knowledge that takes years to gain. I have outlasted a whole bunch of younger people at my work because I take my work seriously and know what I am doing.

Don
post of the week
amen
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Old 04-10-2016, 02:34 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
15,110 posts, read 13,801,424 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by don1945 View Post
The one thing they overlook is that we "Baby Boomers" show up for work, are on time, do not talk on our cell phones or text all day, and we have knowledge that takes years to gain. I have outlasted a whole bunch of younger people at my work because I take my work seriously and know what I am doing.

Don
Yes, because every single millennial out there talks on their cell phones all day. If I talked on my cell phone all day and failed to show up to work on time, I would be out of a job.

There is an employee in my office who probably spends about half the day on the phone talking about their personal life or complaining about something. You know how old they are? 60. They sure waste a lot of time and then complain about not being able to finish their work in time. Just the other day they walked into my boss's office and asked for a raise because of all the "extra work" they have to do. Meanwhile I see other employees (baby boomers, Gen X, and millennials) willingly take on additional work due to our office's attrition policy.

Like I said, you can't judge an entire generation. There are losers and winners in all age groups.
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Old 04-10-2016, 03:22 PM
 
9,912 posts, read 9,305,263 times
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Originally Posted by NewbieHere View Post
Maybe we can get rid of Nancy Pelosi?
To literally get rid of the old people we would have empty the US House of Representatives, US Senate, some members of the SCOTUS, Federal judges, even Maricopa Sheriff Joe is 83 years old.

I am all in for dumping the old senators and house of rep members.
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Old 04-10-2016, 04:05 PM
 
20,769 posts, read 13,763,409 times
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There is plenty of grousing from many quarters about "older workers" not retiring and thus making room for younger ones to be hired and or move up. When it comes to federal and or local government workers you hear complaints about those who "could" retire but continuing working. By could one means that they have reached the age when they could submit papers/have enough time in to qualify...


Federal civil service is having a "problem" in particular finding/getting younger workers interested in joining. The hiring process for many positions is long and it can take sometime to move up the ranks as it were compared to the private sector.
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Old 04-10-2016, 04:15 PM
 
14,260 posts, read 23,995,588 times
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Originally Posted by CarolinaWoman View Post
To literally get rid of the old people we would have empty the US House of Representatives, US Senate, some members of the SCOTUS, Federal judges, even Maricopa Sheriff Joe is 83 years old.

I am all in for dumping the old senators and house of rep members.

If I remember right, there is an election that is held every two years ... and the overwhelming majority are reelected each year. Did you take the time to vote?

==============
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Old 04-10-2016, 05:19 PM
 
Location: Lake Oswego, Manhattan, Aspen
3,236 posts, read 4,210,290 times
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Originally Posted by averagejoe87 View Post
The thing is baby boomers really really messed things up for future generations.

You guys pretty much took everything great that was established by your parents and completely destroyed it. You ruined things for your millennial children. You killed a once-great nation.

So I'm not sure why you expect sympathy from us.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mzfroggez View Post
To be fair, watch movies from the fifties and sixties.. obviously not written nor produced by baby boomers. I am amazed at the lack of moral character displayed in many of them and have had to wonder why our parents didn't object to them.


Prayer in schools was removed in the fifties - again, baby boomers wouldn't have been involved nor capable of preventing that. Our parents were the guardians of the nation. They may have fought in WWII and lived through the Great Depression, but where were they when the positive aspects of our culture were being blatantly removed?


No doubt much of the Boomer generation was front and center on the cover of Life magazine. But children are influenced by the society in which they grow up. If their parents and their grandparents sleep through the desecration of our foundational documents and do not react to the less- and - less subtle attacks on what was "once-a-great nation", please do not blame their children for lacking a moral compass. I am very saddened when I think that by the time I arrived in 1952, the slide was well in play.
It doesn't disturb me, particularly, that 'averagejoe'87' holds these odd beliefs. What DOES disturb me, however, is that apparently he is being FED these beliefs. Who is feeding him these ridiculous notions? And why are these notions being disseminated to the impressionable?

You are right, mzfroggez, about the 'Boomers'. They have, only recently, assumed the reins of power from the "Greatest Generation". And I know of plenty of corporations still controlled by younger members of the "Greatest Generation", or the eldest members of the "Silent Generation". Both the 'Greatest' and 'Silent' generations, if you ask me, were the beneficiaries of a world created by the hard work and prudence of their parents and grandparents (the grandparents and great-grandparents of the 'Boomers'). The 'Boomers', by contrast, grew up amid the wreckage caused by the recklessness and fecklessness of their 'Greatest'/'Silent' Generation parents.

Suffering through Herman Wouk's 'The Winds of War' (a self-congratulatory celebration of the Greatest Generation, produced mainly for their consumption https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ZABDI_G1o4), my suspicions about that generation were confirmed. I can hardly blame a generation who grew up during the Great Depression, only to be confronted with the most horrific war of all time. But 'Winds of War' showed me I was right that theirs was a generation obsessed with conforming, fitting-in, being 'normal', looking 'nice', having their hair just right, not being 'odd', not saying/doing/thinking anything unorthodox, obeying authority, looking to leaders and institutions for solutions to absolutely everything, having a good time, smoking cigarettes, having cocktails, going out to eat, going to the country club, having coffee, and going to the beauty parlor/barber shop.

The 'boomers' (many of whom are STILL being controlled/dominated/intimidated/browbeaten by members of the Silent Generation), seem to have secretly and quietly (nothing was good enough for their parents, so secretiveness meant survival) worked themselves through school, weathered a series of financial upheavals, coped with all manner of contradictory imperatives, and spent much time compensating for the extravagance and "nobleness" of their parents' generation.

One of my friends is from a family whose corporations were founded by a grandfather who was of the 'Lost Generation'. The grandfather died in the Seventies, and his "Greatest/Silent Generations" children took over. For the decades while the "Greatest" ran things, my bud's distributions (as a minor heir) were two or three thousand Dollars per YEAR. But AS SOON as control of the corporations were passed to 'Boomers', those distributions jumped to ten thousand, then, thirty thousand, then fifty thousand. This year, his distribution was six figures.

The "Greatest Generation" had worked a reasonable number of hours - but nothing exceptional. And they had lake houses, airplanes, boats, fabulous cars, fabulous and frequent vacations (much of which was directly or indirectly paid for by the corporations - a huge drain on profits) The "Greatest Generation" had a very good time, while they let their father's little empire slowly crumble. By contrast, their "boomer" children work like crazy, have retired all the corporations debt', have paid cash for enormous improvements, have diversified holdings, and insist that every one of their children get a marketable degree (The "Greatest Generation" saw college as a place to go and look cute while being social).

And that family is only one example. I could rattle off a week's worth of such family histories. I see the 'Baby Boomers' as being survivors in the truest sense. Yes, many of them are 'broken' (Viet Nam can be blamed for that). But as a whole, they are one of America's most resourceful and adaptable generations, definitely among the hardest-working, among the thriftiest, and a generation with superlative values.

Last edited by GrandviewGloria; 04-10-2016 at 05:41 PM..
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Old 04-10-2016, 06:36 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,759 posts, read 7,038,572 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nicet4 View Post
My first computer was a top of the line IBM-XT a real power machine with 640k memory. These came with 512k memory but I needed the extra for a hydraulics program I used. I remember that extra memory was not cheap.

It came with two (count em, two) 5 1/4" floppy disk drives, a monochrome screen (all green all the time) and I seem to remember I paid $1,500 for it in 1985 dollars.

According to this inflation calculator that would be equivalent to $3,305.45 today.

today's hydraulic programs are instant but back then it wasn't unusual for the computer to take 5 or even 10 minutes to iterate an answer to a complex problem. I liked it because I could get a cup of coffee.

A year later I heard what a hard drive was so it was back to the computer store where I had them add a 10 mg (not gig, mg) hard drive that cost $1,100 and would hold the equivalent of 30 floppy disks or whatever the figure was. I remember thinking how I would never fill up the 10 mg hard drive, that it would be enough to last me forever.

In 1989 I purchased my first CAD machine for AutoCad Version 10. Special graphics card and I seem to remember it cost $7,000 in 1989 which would be equivalent to $13,385.30 today. I remember it had the newer DOS 3.1 which was really impressive.

What did we do before computers?

Before the fancy pocket calculators we used Smoley's Parallel Tables of Slopes and Rises In combination with diagrams of slopes and rises and other tables : for bridge and structural engineers, ...

I still have my copy it's leather bound and looks exactly like below:



It's how we did things and if you needed to add feet and inches it was with paper and pencil because there wasn't anything else.

My first pocket calculator would add, subtract, divide and multiply with a green diode display that would eat batteries like popcorn. The first one I purchased ran $300 and in the early 1970's that was a lot of money.
I remember those days too! I recall working on research for a master's degree in 1975-76, and recall we were told we could use the statistics department computer if the stat professor on a given graduate student's committee thought it was worth the trouble of typing in punch cards and inputting the data. So I assumed my work would be done manually so I went and purchased a calculator from Montgomery Ward that sounds like your calculator, but cost me $ 75, a fortune in those days. It didn't even have square root functions. So I used that puppy to do regression line analysis on my data, and submitted that.

When I submitted the data and calculations to the statistics professor on my committee, he actually laughed at the idea that I had calculated all that data on a rudimentary calculator, and said he'd have them run on the department computer. He laughed even harder when I asked him if the data was worth doing that way, and responded, "well.......uh.... YEAH!!!!!!! To this I don't recall how the computer calculations compared with mine but they must have been close enough since the profs looking at it didn't tell me to change my conclusions.

I didn't get involved in working with computers myself (other than to provide moral support to my husband as he did) in those early days. In the early 80's to about 1997 my computer use was limited to patient laboratory test results entry and lookup, some patient demographic data. I had to learn DOS and Windows when after being downsized at age 50, I took a job in a state government regulatory position, and had to write and submit reports electronically, submit data and communicate via email with other employees all over the state and with federal folks as well. And I teleworked in this position so did it at home. Fortunately our IT folks were second to none in their support of us teleworkers.

I retired from that job in 2011, but I still do consulting work with a medical continuing education company-at home, so am still using the computer as I look for publications we can use for CEUs, write test questions for those we use, write other courses we use for CEUs too, submit them to the owners of the company, and otherwise communicate with them. The only things I don't do are social media such as facebook or twitter. Waste of my time, as I see it.
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Old 04-10-2016, 06:43 PM
 
Location: Austin
12,234 posts, read 6,953,257 times
Reputation: 13485
Are you ageism intolerant only or intolerant of all different than you, ersatz?
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