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Old 04-15-2016, 06:42 PM
 
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In a word: socialism (or democratic socialism, if you prefer).
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Old 04-15-2016, 06:44 PM
 
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But I think we're getting off-topic, and heaven knows I don't want to argue economics or politics; it's bad enough I have to listen to it on TV!
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Old 04-15-2016, 07:54 PM
 
Location: NC Piedmont
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Originally Posted by otterhere View Post
But I think we're getting off-topic, and heaven knows I don't want to argue economics or politics; it's bad enough I have to listen to it on TV!
Agreed. We have both put out out opinions, stated what we base them on and most of the others on this forum have already made up their minds one way or another anyway.
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Old 04-15-2016, 08:15 PM
 
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Originally Posted by rjm1cc View Post
If you can come up with the right product you can but remember you need enough money to support yourself and family for 60 or 70 years. Don't forget inflation when you make up your budget.
Staying single and childless would make retiring young a greater possibility.
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Old 04-15-2016, 08:19 PM
 
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Originally Posted by photobuff42 View Post
I don't think it would be good for you. At that age, your brain should be in a mode to have a career and actively contribute to society.

Retirement can be similar but only after building up a base of experience. I don't think a 20s retirement would be fun at all.
Oh, many ways to stimulate the brain and remain productive in life besides working for a living. I'm not so certain that working for a living and/or having a career is the best way to stay engaged, productive, and occupied. Without having to report to a job, one would have endless possibilities. Working for a living is for people that have to work for a living (myself included). I'd much rather fill up my time doing things besides working for a paycheck.

And even if someone simply did nothing for the rest of his/her life, so what? Where is it written in stone that a person has to do anything at all (besides being self-supportive and paying taxes).
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Old 04-15-2016, 08:25 PM
 
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Originally Posted by DaveinMtAiry View Post
Agreed. I have read a few things written by people in this position. They are bored out of their minds. All their friends have jobs, families, lives to live so they end up playing golf or going on trips by themselves. They find themselves with no reason to get out of bed in the morning, or in many cases after noon. They have no purpose. It's like Christmas every day, it would get old very very fast at that age.
Why correlate working or work with having a life though? A life is a life regardless of what that life entails. Working for a living (in my opinion) is a necessary evil, something that most people have to do in order to survive and not live under freeway overpass in a cardboard box. But out of all the possible activities and endeavors in this life, why should work be held to such a high importance? The fact that most people work shouldn't muddy the view and elevate 'working' as some necessary activity that people have to do in order to give their lives meaning or to give themselves purpose. If you are lucky enough to retire early and not have to work, then spend the rest of your life doing what you want, when you want. That is your purpose.
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Old 04-15-2016, 09:08 PM
 
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Originally Posted by ReachTheBeach View Post
... is that really the right way for us as a society? To have winners who make millions of times as much as the losers? Life of luxury? Yes, absolutely, I think that's more than fair if you are really innovative or hard working. But the scale of economic difference is mind boggling; way beyond what I think anyone can logically defend.
It's probably not difficult to reach consensus that there ought to be some parity between input of effort/talent, and output of success/wealth/recognition. At some level, persons who invent worthwhile things, who produce in-demand goods and services and so forth, ought justifiably to garner a reward. The problem arises when we have huge disparity of success despite minor disparity in talent or effort. The classic example is that of professional musicians, athletes and the like. The difference in skill between a superstar touring violin soloist, and between the best violinist in a community orchestra, is not terrifically large. Both are remarkably good players. But the community-orchestra player earns perhaps $500 every other week for a performance, while the internationally touring soloist earns millions. So there's great inequality of outcome for minor inequality of quality. Is this a gross and untenable distortion, courtesy of market-forces? Or is this an unavoidable phenomenon of nature?

Returning to our theme in this thread, neither the superstar concert-violinist, nor the community-orchestra player, is likely to take early-retirement. Why? Because they've melded vocation with avocation, and to cease their professional endeavor would be a kind of intellectual suicide.


Quote:
Originally Posted by AnthonyJ34 View Post
Staying single and childless would make retiring young a greater possibility.
Financially, perhaps; though one could argue that the marriage of career-oriented professionals is more likely to result in affluence (and presumably the option for early-retirement) than had the two would-be partners been single. But what about emotionally and culturally and socially? An unmarried child-free person is far more dependent on artificial social constructs, such as the workplace, than on more natural constructs, such as the family. He/she would continue working not for financial reasons, but to stave off isolation. The workplace not only provides social contact in the office, but is the center of a web of proliferating contacts friends of coworkers, people to meet at vocational conferences, students and professors and administrators and so forth.
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Old 04-16-2016, 10:58 AM
 
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Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
It's probably not difficult to reach consensus that there ought to be some parity between input of effort/talent, and output of success/wealth/recognition. At some level, persons who invent worthwhile things, who produce in-demand goods and services and so forth, ought justifiably to garner a reward. The problem arises when we have huge disparity of success despite minor disparity in talent or effort. The classic example is that of professional musicians, athletes and the like. The difference in skill between a superstar touring violin soloist, and between the best violinist in a community orchestra, is not terrifically large. Both are remarkably good players. But the community-orchestra player earns perhaps $500 every other week for a performance, while the internationally touring soloist earns millions. So there's great inequality of outcome for minor inequality of quality. Is this a gross and untenable distortion, courtesy of market-forces? Or is this an unavoidable phenomenon of nature?

Returning to our theme in this thread, neither the superstar concert-violinist, nor the community-orchestra player, is likely to take early-retirement. Why? Because they've melded vocation with avocation, and to cease their professional endeavor would be a kind of intellectual suicide.




Financially, perhaps; though one could argue that the marriage of career-oriented professionals is more likely to result in affluence (and presumably the option for early-retirement) than had the two would-be partners been single. But what about emotionally and culturally and socially? An unmarried child-free person is far more dependent on artificial social constructs, such as the workplace, than on more natural constructs, such as the family. He/she would continue working not for financial reasons, but to stave off isolation. The workplace not only provides social contact in the office, but is the center of a web of proliferating contacts friends of coworkers, people to meet at vocational conferences, students and professors and administrators and so forth.
Just curious. Are you an English professor? Philosopher?
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