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Old 04-12-2016, 03:39 PM
 
Location: CT
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Unless you were able to build an incredibly puposeful and fulfilling life, you're probably talking a full lifetime into your 80's, so maybe 60 years to spend, doing what? If money were no object after a while, would you have done all you can do? Would it kind of be like Bill Murray in Ground Hog Day? After a while you kind of lose it, then rebuild yourself?
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Old 04-12-2016, 06:33 PM
 
Location: The city of champions
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Working in a cubicle for a corporation is a wasted life. Retiring as young as possible should be anyone's goals. To be able to truly focus on one's hobbies and passions full time, to be able to see the world or simply being able to experience your own city. We waste away our years doing nothing really and by the time we are ready to retire we are so passed our physical prime that we miss out.


I want to retire as young as possible and just have the comfort of knowing I have the money I need to survive and not stress. Trust me, I'll never be bored. There is much to see and do.
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Old 04-13-2016, 06:15 AM
 
7,845 posts, read 4,434,819 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snowtired14 View Post
Unless you were able to build an incredibly puposeful and fulfilling life, you're probably talking a full lifetime into your 80's, so maybe 60 years to spend, doing what? If money were no object after a while, would you have done all you can do? Would it kind of be like Bill Murray in Ground Hog Day? After a while you kind of lose it, then rebuild yourself?
Not that most jobs are "incredibly purposeful and fulfilling" (usually far from it), but jobs DO give you structure and a schedule, which I guess helps keep you from losing it. Whether you retire at 20 or 80, "you should always retire TO something and not FROM something." Always have a goal and a plan...
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Old 04-13-2016, 08:15 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,830 posts, read 17,744,737 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by otterhere View Post
Not that most jobs are "incredibly purposeful and fulfilling" (usually far from it), but jobs DO give you structure and a schedule, which I guess helps keep you from losing it. Whether you retire at 20 or 80, "you should always retire TO something and not FROM something." Always have a goal and a plan...
That's one of the biggest things I've noticed. Many, many folks who retire, are unemployed, etc., do not have much structure in their lives. Without something to be accountable to, people lose that structure, and sometimes things go downhill from there.
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Old 04-13-2016, 08:17 AM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
34,001 posts, read 42,337,121 times
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Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
That's one of the biggest things I've noticed. Many, many folks who retire, are unemployed, etc., do not have much structure in their lives. Without something to be accountable to, people lose that structure, and sometimes things go downhill from there.

And some us worked our entire careers in highly structured environments so it's nice to be able to say, "I can go take a **** now instead of waiting until lunch".
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Old 04-13-2016, 08:31 AM
 
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To properly enjoy leisure, one must first inculcate a sense of self-achievement and worth. Dessert before the main-course feels illegitimate and guilty. The purpose of lifetime employment isn't self-lashing or the crude and uncompromising dictates of a cubicle, but to build a sense of achievement, where one comes to feel deserving of rest and with dispensing with schedules.

As I said earlier, some people are born retired. But not many. Most require some pursuit before according themselves the privilege of retirement.
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Old 04-13-2016, 09:14 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
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Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
And some us worked our entire careers in highly structured environments so it's nice to be able to say, "I can go take a **** now instead of waiting until lunch".
There's a difference between basic flexibility like that and not having a care in the world and absolutely no structure at all.
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Old 04-13-2016, 10:59 AM
 
Location: NC Piedmont
3,973 posts, read 2,907,089 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
To properly enjoy leisure, one must first inculcate a sense of self-achievement and worth. Dessert before the main-course feels illegitimate and guilty. The purpose of lifetime employment isn't self-lashing or the crude and uncompromising dictates of a cubicle, but to build a sense of achievement, where one comes to feel deserving of rest and with dispensing with schedules.

As I said earlier, some people are born retired. But not many. Most require some pursuit before according themselves the privilege of retirement.
Do you use that level of articulation in everyday conversation?

I think that many people don't feel like they have to earn free time to enjoy it. We were born into childhood (the fruit of someone else's labor ) and frankly leisure pretty much goes downhill from there in both quantity and quality, at least IMO. I do like to feel I am needed and have a purpose but I don't feel like I need to achieve some goal before I would enjoy setting my own schedule.

The main thing about these threads that I dislike (and from a lot of posts, it seems others share this) is someone using a term that I think means something rather specific to mean something else entirely. You can be a member of the idle rich at any age but in my mind there is more to retiring than just not working. When someone says they are retired, I infer some things that just aren't true about a "young retiree" (which is a conflict of terms in my mind).
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Old 04-13-2016, 01:54 PM
 
Location: CT
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Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
And some us worked our entire careers in highly structured environments so it's nice to be able to say, "I can go take a **** now instead of waiting until lunch".
You had to **** on your own time!!!!?????
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Old 04-13-2016, 02:08 PM
 
Location: CT
3,460 posts, read 1,867,156 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by otterhere View Post
Not that most jobs are "incredibly purposeful and fulfilling" (usually far from it), but jobs DO give you structure and a schedule, which I guess helps keep you from losing it. Whether you retire at 20 or 80, "you should always retire TO something and not FROM something." Always have a goal and a plan...
But, the OP was presuming you had the means to retire very young, then what? For instance, Bill Gates made his fortune early and was semi retired by the time he was about 40, but his new passion is philanthropy, but he has the wealth to pursue it and enjoy it. A goal and a plan, I guess, I'm an obsessive planner, everything has to be right and everything has to be in place, but other friends are more the carefree types and they seem just as happy taking each day anew, and they're enjoying retirement or personal pursuits while I still fret about being ready for the day I leave work for the last time and toil on.
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