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Old 02-22-2008, 05:02 PM
 
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For those of us in our late 50's and early 60's as early retireees, what cities are the best for hiring mature workers? Many of us have limited resources and need to keep working after relocating for retirement. What cities are most friendly to mature workers and have plentiful jobs?
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Old 02-23-2008, 03:53 PM
 
Location: Knoxville, TN
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A small city with a large university. Employers are more part-time job friendly to take advantage of the college student workforce. Most are thrilled to get an older, already trained worker instead.
I'm in Knoxville, TN, and a lot of places actively seek retirees for all kinds of part-time work. They want a break from the constant turnover and training of the college kids.
Universities also have a lot of part-time jobs in administration and again are thrilled to get someone who will be around for awhile.
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Old 02-23-2008, 04:00 PM
 
Location: Marietta, GA
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You didn't say what field you are in or what part of the country you live in now. I'm sure you wouldn't want to move clear across the country in search of a part-time job. What kind of work do you enjoy doing?
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Old 02-23-2008, 07:22 PM
 
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Originally Posted by NorthmeetsSouth View Post
You didn't say what field you are in or what part of the country you live in now. I'm sure you wouldn't want to move clear across the country in search of a part-time job. What kind of work do you enjoy doing?
No, I'm not looking to move across the country for a part-time job, but employment is one consideration in choosing a "semi-retirement" location. I'm in a smaller city in Michigan and looking to relocate and semi-retire to an urban location (or with access to a city) with modest costs of living, access to cultural options, and employment opportunities for mature workers (not as a "greeter" at Walmart). I have many years of office experience, excellent skills and excellent references. Preferred climate is cooler rather than hot. Anyway, employment is an important factor in making a good decision, together with a modest cost of living and overall safety (low crime). Any suggestions?
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Old 02-23-2008, 07:56 PM
 
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First look at what part of the country has the lowest unemployment and then lok at towns nearby that have a low cost of living. It will take some reserach that no one is going to do for you.The idea climate for you is going to be a problem tho.The city data page has sone statics but not sure how curent they are expecially with the quick changes happening ni the economy.Insurenace with a company might be a problem at those ages tho and any existing problems.
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Old 02-24-2008, 11:24 AM
 
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Originally Posted by texdav View Post
First look at what part of the country has the lowest unemployment and then lok at towns nearby that have a low cost of living. It will take some reserach that no one is going to do for you.The idea climate for you is going to be a problem tho.The city data page has sone statics but not sure how curent they are expecially with the quick changes happening ni the economy.Insurenace with a company might be a problem at those ages tho and any existing problems.
I've been doing extensive research for about a year, but would also like to hear from people with first-hand experiences, which is another kind of research. The lowest unemployment is in the south and southwest, unfortunately for me at least, as I would prefer not to live in a hot climate. Overall, the crime rate is highest in the southern half of the country, with some exceptions. I'm hoping to find a city in a reasonable location with a modest cost of living and reasonable unemployment. I'm attracted to the northwest, but would need to find an area with modest living costs, such as a smaller city.
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Old 02-25-2008, 06:53 AM
 
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Well, Boston is high-cost, however, you can live outside the city like I do. Public transportation is quite good. And, it's good and cold here! Not as much as where I came from, upstate New York, but it'll do.

My employer, Massachusetts General Hospital, is one of the top employers of older workers, according to AARP. I'm 57, but I'll tell you, there are lots of people around here who are much older than I am. And, I know people who are doing their retirement here in phases, cutting hours, and then finally not working.

And, you have Boston, which has everything. I moved here about 30 years ago, and I love it. Massachusetts is also one of the states that has an agency just for hiring older workers.

I was lucky to land up here, although I didn't know it at the time. It is expensive in some places, but it can be done outside the city. I ride the commuter rail everyday.
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Old 02-26-2008, 07:30 PM
 
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Originally Posted by cousinsal View Post
Well, Boston is high-cost, however, you can live outside the city like I do. Public transportation is quite good. And, it's good and cold here! Not as much as where I came from, upstate New York, but it'll do.

My employer, Massachusetts General Hospital, is one of the top employers of older workers, according to AARP. I'm 57, but I'll tell you, there are lots of people around here who are much older than I am. And, I know people who are doing their retirement here in phases, cutting hours, and then finally not working.

And, you have Boston, which has everything. I moved here about 30 years ago, and I love it. Massachusetts is also one of the states that has an agency just for hiring older workers.

I was lucky to land up here, although I didn't know it at the time. It is expensive in some places, but it can be done outside the city. I ride the commuter rail everyday.
What part of Boston do you live in? A suburb or smaller town? Do you mind saying which one? I've always loved Boston and New England, but have kind of ruled it out because the cost of living is high. Maybe I should give it a second look. What are some of the more affordable surrounding areas?
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Old 02-27-2008, 09:56 AM
 
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Originally Posted by xz2y View Post
What part of Boston do you live in? A suburb or smaller town? Do you mind saying which one? I've always loved Boston and New England, but have kind of ruled it out because the cost of living is high. Maybe I should give it a second look. What are some of the more affordable surrounding areas?
I actually live in Salem, a town of 40,000, which is 15 miles north of Boston. The commuter rail takes about 30 minutes each way. As far as buying, of course, now is a good time because everything is going down here, except in Boston itself, I imagine.

There's lots of places to live outside Boston - I'm on the North Shore - there's Salem, Marblehead (expensive), Peabody, Lynn - there are some areas that are not high-rent. You could look up the demographics of Massachusetts to see the average home prices, average incomes, etc. in each town.

Then, there's western Massachusetts which is quite low-cost. I have a friend from Tennessee who's moving back here after being away 25 years, and she's probably going to try western Mass. They also have the commuter rail.

Some people even live in R.I., and commute. Then, there's the South Shore (probably expensive), and northwest and southwest of Boston, which are lower-cost areas. I have a friend who lives in Methuen, right beneath New Hampshire - you can go over the line to buy things, since they don't have tax. Or, you can live in N.H.

Lots of possibilities, but you would have to dig to find the right town. There are some "burbs" outside Boston that are basically part of Boston - like Somerville, Cambridge, Brookline, Brighton - they all have the subways and buses. Some of those areas are not too bad - like Somerville or Brighton. When I lived down there in Brookline, I didn't need a car.
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Old 02-29-2008, 02:41 PM
 
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The subway has an MGH stop. Any way to get to the Red Line gets you a good non-car commute. Salem has become quite the place for a good commute into town. And yes, condo prices, etc., have come down a lot. (Don't know about rents, but they've never been cheap).
Utilities are very high, mostly for heat.
I'd retire here, but not because it was a financial benefit- more because a) I'm already here and love my house b) Winter doesn't bother me and c) It's a very rich area for many things. Just not cheap living.
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