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Old 09-28-2016, 11:20 AM
 
26,591 posts, read 52,352,650 times
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I learned a lot just from listening to older folks...

My first real job was at a specialty restoration business that catered to a lot of well off individuals... the conversations were very informative and most were willing to give advice freely to the kid...

Also, some of my neighbors were quite old with fascinating stories of the olden days...

I gained a lot for simply showing interest and for listening.
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Old 09-28-2016, 11:36 AM
 
4,349 posts, read 6,064,802 times
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Can't say I pay much attention to old people either and I'm 66. This is not meant to be universal but a lot of older people can't get off the subject of themselves. Their worlds are small and it's the same old conversation all the time.
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Old 09-28-2016, 11:44 AM
 
10,388 posts, read 9,397,617 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rigizug View Post
I'm almost 60. When I was a kid I heard a lot of this same old talk.
Yep. . . and 60 yrs from now these kids will be complaining about the same thing.
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Old 09-28-2016, 12:15 PM
 
Location: Milwaukee Area of WI
1,886 posts, read 1,297,378 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dothetwist View Post
Growing up, my grandmother lived next door and this was not unusual for families in my neighborhood. As a child, I interacted with older people all the time (not just older family members).

I blame the age-segregated communities that are now popular...senior housing.

I am a senior (63 y/o) and have no desire to disconnect and live in either a 55+ community or other senior housing. I enjoy a diversified community of all ages, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, etc.

This way I can interact with all ages, not just other 'old' people. I talk to (and get advice from) teens about smart phones, social media usage, etc. Young families on our street have asked us about finances (ie. how we managed to retire at ages 50 and 51).

We live in a walkable area, talk to neighbors daily as we walk to shop, bank, post office. It is far healthier for oldsters to walk, talk and interact with everyone and the best way to do that is not isolate themselves. We can all learn from each other, and that includes other age groups.

I totally agree with what you said!
I am almost 55 and I don't ever want to live in an area where there is just seniors. We really can learn from each other (Young and Old)
You just have to make the effort if you want to keep learning, being sociable and be active in your community
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Old 09-28-2016, 12:29 PM
 
Location: Backwoods of Maine
7,118 posts, read 8,165,408 times
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Oh - are you talkin' about me???

(Only age 69)
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Old 09-28-2016, 12:44 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,642 posts, read 17,615,071 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pitt Chick View Post
Can't expect young people to even notice you when you surround yourself with only old people....

What do you do to involve yourself with those younger than you?
They don't deliberately do that but they are older and most of their client base is older as well. Kind of self-sorting.
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Old 09-28-2016, 02:05 PM
 
6,307 posts, read 4,755,565 times
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I am around young people all the time. I take classes on a college campus. I participate in my favorite sport with undergraduates. I even had a huge number of Facebook friends and followers who became friends because they want to see the photography I post.
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Old 09-28-2016, 02:41 PM
 
Location: Copenhagen, Denmark
10,529 posts, read 8,778,692 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
Do you agree with him that younger adults just don't pay attention to or respect older people like they used to?
This is nothing new. We were there, our grandparents, great grandparents, ...., ? have all been there.

It's called the generation gap.

You gotta remember: the older people get, the slower they get, the less sex they get, the grouchier they get, the less they remember, and the more bad experiences they have..... It's written into our brains at birth, but as WE grow older we lose our sense of invincibility and begin to realize how frail we've actually been all our lives, and finally by the time we just begin to think we have figured things out, the Big Guyin the sky pulls the plug on us.

It happens with every generation. Our kids will realize this one day, and so will their kids, and their kids' kids, and so on.
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Old 09-28-2016, 02:42 PM
 
Location: Arizona
5,967 posts, read 5,317,347 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yourown2feet View Post
As I recall, we didn't particularly notice or like old people when I was young, either. I was taught to offer my seat and open doors for any person who seemed particularly decrepit, so maybe that isn't being taught universally any more.

To younger people, old people are a different species. They look strange, wear odd clothing, complain a lot, and always seem to be disappointed about something. And it goes both ways - they act like young people are a different species, too. When's the last time someone over 60 got into a real, seeking conversation with a teenager about modern pop music, without managing to convey that they think that music is way inferior to what they listened to in the 1960's? Or indicated a genuine interest in, and understanding of, computer games? I believe it falls to the older, more mature, presumably wiser person to seek common ground, since that person has more experience in doing so.
Bad examples. The old have no interest in computer games and modern music the same as the young have no interest in what older people enjoy.

They should be talking about ideas.
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Old 09-28-2016, 03:37 PM
 
12,825 posts, read 20,160,725 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yourown2feet View Post
As I recall, we didn't particularly notice or like old people when I was young, either. I was taught to offer my seat and open doors for any person who seemed particularly decrepit, so maybe that isn't being taught universally any more.

To younger people, old people are a different species. They look strange, wear odd clothing, complain a lot, and always seem to be disappointed about something. And it goes both ways - they act like young people are a different species, too. When's the last time someone over 60 got into a real, seeking conversation with a teenager about modern pop music, without managing to convey that they think that music is way inferior to what they listened to in the 1960's? Or indicated a genuine interest in, and understanding of, computer games? I believe it falls to the older, more mature, presumably wiser person to seek common ground, since that person has more experience in doing so.
The day I lose interest in current rock / alternative music, take me out to the back 40 and shoot me.

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